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Letter from John Phillips

BAAS - WW appointed by BAAS to be one of a committee for 'drawing up instructions for observers in Physical Science'. Printed letter completed in manuscript.

Letter from John Phillips

BAAS, York - WW to describe tide observations made at the Port of Bristol on behalf of the BAAS. Printed letter completed in manuscript.

Letter from John Phillips

BAAS, York - WW appointed one of a committee to help promote 'inquries concerning Isomorphism and the connexion between crystalline form & chemical constitution'. Printed letter completed in manuscript.

Letter from John Phillips

BAAS, York - BAAS require a copy or abstract of the communications WW presented at the Bristol meeting. Printed letter completed in manuscript.

Letter from James Thomson

Glasgow - WW elected a corresponding member for Cambridge with the BAAS Committee on Exhibition of Models & Manufactures. Printed letter completed in manuscript.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Sends [back] Myers two books [not included]; judges Helplessness of Miss Pick [a short story in Odd Issues, by Samuel Squire Sprigge] to be 'quite firstrate'. Declares that the actual date of their departure from London is rather uncertain, but reports that his convalescence 'is supposed to be steady'. States that the letter is the first written with his own hand [since his operation].

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

States that he has wanted to write to Myers since he and Nora went back to Cambridge [after his mother's funeral], but claims that he finds it difficult to write 'not from painfulness of feeling', since his mother's death 'seems really a release, but from perplexity and mingledness.' Writes that he feels as if he had 'reached the summit of the Pass of Life: behind the old memories from infancy, unrolled like a map, and before the strange world of "the majority" near though in a mist, at which [he is] forced to gaze. And more than ever the alternatives of the Great Either-Or seem to be Pessimism or Faith'.

Reports that Nora was away 'all the time at Terling'. States that, although she was not seriously ill, he had been worried about her, but she considers herself quite well now.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Discusses Myers' intention to take up medicine. Warns that it could be 'too great an investment of time and nervous energy. [Part of letter deleted by Myers?]. Remarks that there seems to be much to be said for the subject, but that it does not seem likely 'to lead to much poetry'. Of a poem by Myers about Alfred de Musset, remarks that he 'cannot quite divine the evolution of thought in the whole piece...' [A note in Myers' hand states that he put an end to the poem 'on the receipt of this criticism.' Announces that he intends to go to Hallsteads on the following Saturday for a day or two. States that his book is 'at a standstill. Reports that Roden Noel claims that 'all people whose taste has not been perverted by academic education regard him as Coming Poet', and so he can't stand Sidgwick anymore. [Partly deleted note by Myers refers to Roden Noel]

Letter from Florence Austen Leigh to Nora Sidgwick

Writes on the death of Henry Sidgwick to express her and [her husband's - the Provost of King's College] sympathy with Nora on her loss. Refers to the pleasure that she derived from the conversations she had at different times with Henry, who she describes as 'so good as well as delightful and clever.' Reports that the last time her husband saw Henry, the latter gave him some very good advice about a University controversy, which he followed.

Leigh, Florence Emma Austen (1857-1926) wife of Augustus Austen Leigh

Letter from M. F. Latham to Nora Sidgwick

She and her family 'always considered Mr Sidgwick, when [they] were all young together, as the most lively, interested talker' they knew. Remembers a visit he made to them as an undergraduate [in 1858], when he stayed some time, 'joined in everything the family did, and... made everything he joined in more amusing'. He suggested they 'should get up Tableau vivants'', proposing 'Sleeping Beauty' for her, and saying that Miss Tawney - her sister-in-law - 'would do excellently for the beauty.'

Relates another incident during the same visit in which she went to the drawing room to help her mother receive some callers 'and saw at the other end of the room Mr. Sidgwick asleep in an easy chair, dressed in an Afghan costume of white felt belonging to [her] father, and wearing the fur cap belonging to it', with a sleeping kitten asleep on top. Declares that he was such a charming visitor, 'always amusing and always making himself at home with [them].'

Latham, Marianne Frances (1839-1926) née Bernard, mistress of Girton

Letter from M.F. Latham to [ ] Marshall.

Thanks Marshall for [sending her a letter from F.W.H. Myers], and says that she now understands something of what she [Marshall] described 'of a "thrill" from [ ] Mr. Myers' style'. Is surprised at what Myers says 'about H Sidgwick's ways in youth', as she and her family always considered him 'as the most lively interested talker [they] knew, interested in discussing anything and everything.' Recalls one of his visits as an undergraduate, when he joined in everthing the family did, and they considered that he made everything he took part in more amusing. Refers also to his organising of discussions on wet days, and how he would sometimes be the only outsider among a large family group. Says that she noticed when she came to Cambridge that 'he was altered, quiet, apparently absorbed in thought and though he was always responsive he no longer started things as of old'; 'this would be about the time when he was much occupied with university reforms as well as women's education and other social reforms.' Adds that he was always delightful to meet, and recalls 'with gratitude the letter, alluding to old times', that he wrote to her when her mother died.

Latham, Marianne Frances (1839-1926) née Bernard, mistress of Girton

Letter from Lady Victoria Welby-Gregory to Nora Sidgwick

States that 'having so long and so eagerly looked out for any request for "letters"' the appearance of a notice in Macmillan's Magazine of the impending appearance of a memoir with Henry Sidgwick's letters has come as somewhat of a shock to her. Begs Nora's forgiveness if she has sent any of the enclosed letters [105/45/2-5], but Miss C[arter] does not remember copying them. If she ever tries 'to give some sketch of the inception' of her work on "Significs" she would certainly have to refer to Henry 'as being one of its first and greatest promoters'. Refers to the accompanying letters, and also to the assistance Henry gave her in conversation on the matter. She will be sorry if none of the letters appeared in the memoir. She has often lately longed to tell Henry 'of the abounding signs that the young world is beginning to see...that the key to one of the greatest of the human positions has been lost and must be found'; predicts that she will not live to see the result of such finding, but that it is enough to be allowed to help 'even so little or badly towards it'. Adds that there are many more short letters, but that they are chiefly about dates or places etc.

Accompanied by envelope, addressed to Nora Sidgwick at Newnham College, with MS notes in Nora's hand: 'Lady Welby/Copies of letters from Henry/Received too late to be considered for Memoir'.

Copy letter from Henry Sidgwick to Lady Victoria Welby-Gregory

Typewritten copy of letter dated 31 January 1896. Apologises for not having written to her sooner with reference to her article in Mind on ' Significs'; explains that he has been very busy. Adds that he has delayed to write partly because he does not have any useful suggestions on the question of 'a Paper for the International Congress of Psychology'. Declares that he believes that the question 'is mainly one for logicians rather than psychologists and that it will not be very easy to find a mode of treatment which will make it an altogether appropriate topic for a Psychological Congress'. Suggests ' Interpretation as a psychological process' or some similar phrase as the title of her paper. Observes that she does not include psychology 'on p.25 - among the list of studies that has a peculiar meaning term correlated with it', and remarks that he thinks that there would be 'some interest in working out the characteristics of Interpretation as a psychological process'.

Gregory, Lady Victoria Alexandrina Maria Louisa Welby- (1837-1912) Lady Welby, philosopher

Copy letter from Henry Sidgwick to Lady Victoria Welby-Gregory

Typewritten copy of letter dated 11 August 1891. Says that her two pamphlets she sent him have greatly interested him; believes that her Great Cloud of Witnesses will be most improving to the reader, 'if it does not reduce him to a too depressing state of scepticism.' Observes that it is difficult 'to persuade a plain man to go through the process necessary to attain precision of thought': attempted to do something similar in The Principles of Political Economy, but fears that he 'bored the readers horribly'. Would much like to see Herbert Spencer's answer to her Apparent Paradox; refers to the belief in ancestral ghosts. If she wants 'to call Locke as a "witness", it would be easy to find suitable quotations in Chap. ix of Book III of the Essays on the Human Understanding, which deals with the "Imperfection of Words".' Also refers to 'Aphorism xv in [Bacon's] Novum Organum'. However, he believes modern instances to be more impressive, 'as it might be supposed that the progress of science had removed the evils pointed out by Bacon and Locke.'

Gregory, Lady Victoria Alexandrina Maria Louisa Welby- (1837-1912) Lady Welby, philosopher

Copy letter from Henry Sidgwick to Lady Victoria Welby-Gregory

Typewritten copy of letter dated 22 September 1893. Asks her to arrange for a search to be made of the room he occupied for some letters and postcards that he left behind there. Discusses Welby-Gregory's 'idea of "Significs" ', and asks what there is to be known about the relations of things beyond what is known of them already, what is the value or worth of things, and what is 'the ultimate End or Good to which all the processes of change in the world'. Says the last question is 'the fundamental question of philosophy', and discusses the likely reaction of the scientist and the logician to it.

Gregory, Lady Victoria Alexandrina Maria Louisa Welby- (1837-1912) Lady Welby, philosopher

Copy letter from Henry Sidgwick to Lady Victoria Welby-Gregory

Typewritten copy of letter dated 28 September 1893. Thanks her for sending him his postcards; explains that the latter 'belonged to a "case" in Psychical Research'. Returns an extract from the Pall Mall Gazette that she sent to him [not included]; calls it 'brightly written and instructive', and believes 'Miss Welby must have a decided talent for this sort of work'. Does not think that she has 'quite caught the salient points of Paulsen's work', but admits that this would be 'almost too much to expect in a brief notice of this kind.' Thanks her for her copies of Selections: will give one to Stout and distribute the others 'to persons who seem worthy of them'. Has read her paper and notes with much interest: thinks that he understands her view more clearly, but that the questions for which she seeks answers will really require a system of philosophy to answer them. Will have a clearer view when he learns the opinions of his 'logical friends' of the points urged 'in the other paper'.

Gregory, Lady Victoria Alexandrina Maria Louisa Welby- (1837-1912) Lady Welby, philosopher

Copy letter from Henry Sidgwick to Lady Victoria Welby-Gregory

Typewritten copy of letter dated 28 November 1893: Has received the answers [not included] of 'the four logicians', including 'Miss Jones' and Venn, to whom he had undertaken to communicate Welby-Gregory's paper. Hopes that she will find the answers 'not uninteresting', and helpful to her purpose. Adds that he is inclined to agree most with 'Miss Jones' second thoughts.'

Gregory, Lady Victoria Alexandrina Maria Louisa Welby- (1837-1912) Lady Welby, philosopher

Copy letter from Henry Sidgwick to Lady Victoria Welby-Gregory

Typewritten copy of letter dated 23 November 1893. Regrets to hear that her health has caused so long an interruption in her work, and undertakes to communicate to his 'logical correspondents' her thanks for their comments on her criticisms. Sends back 'by the same post the untravelled copy' of her criticisms' [not included]; explains that he intends to keep the travelled copy provisionally in case he has an opportunity of showing it to 'some logician of a different school', whose comments on it, 'from a Hegelian point of view', might be of interest to her.

Gregory, Lady Victoria Alexandrina Maria Louisa Welby- (1837-1912) Lady Welby, philosopher

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