Showing 5414 results

Archival description
Additional Manuscripts c
Print preview View:

7 results with digital objects Show results with digital objects

William Whewell to Richard Jones

WW has been trying to find RJ all around the country: 'I had trusted to revive many old and acquire many new ideas: and more especially just now when I have cleared away the obstacles that stood between me and the speculations about wh. we used to talk I had anticipated much edifying discourse upon the past[,] the present and the future'. WW wanted to talk to RJ about 'the Review wh. Rose [Hugh James Rose] says is again labouring into existence' - WW does not think they 'have strength for it' yet.

William Whewell to Richard Jones

Trinity College - Is RJ aware of the plan of John Herschel, George Peacock and WW coming to visit him? WW is going to spend possibly six to eight weeks on the continent - Normandy, the Netherlands and then to the Rhine. WW is to have the tutorship with Brown for the next year, then Brown 'goes and leaves me absolute Lord of all his pupils'. WW hopes that he is right in thinking that RJ is near completing his work on political economy.

William Whewell to Richard Jones

Trinity College - WW has just returned from his German trip [see WW to RJ, 25 June 1825]. He will keep an eye out for Attree [William W. Attree - RJ's nephew]. WW will make time to read RJ's political economy if he sends it to him. He has 'got hundreds of mineralogical maggots in my head which I found in Germany and which may crawl into daylight hereafter - but now mind this my injunction - Do not go and conspire with Peacock [George Peacock] or any body else to tell our friends that I am bedeviled with german philosophy, as you once raised an essay with the accusation of a priori metaphysics [see WW to RJ, 16 August 1822]. If you do so you may easily give people an impression which you will not be able to remove when I have convinced you, as I certainly shall at the first opportunity, that everything which I believe is most true, philosophical, and inductive. Another injunction I also would give you. Do not imagine I am doing all for the material sciences with my mineralogy. If I do not fail altogether, it will be seen that this is one of the very best occasions to rectify and apply our general principles of reasoning; and my science shall, without ceasing to be good and true mineralogy, be also a most profitable example of that higher philosophy of yours which legislates for sciences - Remember also that we have got to do something for that same philosophy one day'. The talk of Cambridge is the Greek professorship - 'Rose [Hugh Rose] and Hare [Julius Hare] are considered the most likely candidates'.

William Whewell to Richard Jones

Trinity College - WW has had confirmation that Herschel [John Herschel] will not be coming forward for the vacant office of Lucasian Chair of Mathematics. 'Babbage [Charles Babbage] is making application and has written to people here on the subject. He has no chance whatever and it is mere extravagance, at least as appears to me, his taking up the thing. I do undoubtedly believe that he would be a good Professor now, but it is too much to expect that our heads should understand not only his merits, but the varying shape of them as time and circumstances may have modified it'. WW thinks Peacock [George Peacock] the most desirous candidate: 'I suppose Airy [George Airy] will not think of offering him for though he would be a better professor, it would be ungracious in him to fight Peacock - and after all it makes no difference. For French if he be a candidate will undoubtedly be elected'.

William Whewell to Richard Jones

Trinity College - If WW gets a chance tonight he will send RJ the results of Airy's [George Airy] 'enquiries about wages etc - you will see that they apply to a particular district'. It now seems that no tutor or lector is eligible - Airy who is no lector, though a lecturer, is a candidate. Of course he has no chance which is a pity as he would make the best professor of all of us'.

William Whewell to Richard Jones

Trinity College - Attree [William Attree] tells WW that RJ has composed an epistle to the syndics of the Cambridge Press. WW has not yet spoken to any of the members 'thinking it better not to do so till I could press the matter to the utmost by producing details or manuscript' [see WW to RJ, 20 Sept. 1827]. WW will have to soon decide on the professorship: 'I do not intend to devote my life to mineralogy and should probably not keep the professorship many years'. Nevertheless he intends to become master of the subject and introduce reforms. He would also 'like the kind of rank which it gives here'.

William Whewell to Richard Jones

Trinity College - Further to WW's last letter concerning the printing of RJ's book: 'Rose [Hugh James Rose] I believe with his book of inscriptions did exactly what you suggested. The syndics paid the expenses of the book and then Rose sold it to Murray' [see WW to RJ, 6 January 1828]. WW and others wish John Herschel could be persuaded to take the Lucasian Chair.

William Whewell to Richard Jones

Trinity College - WW hopes RJ's political economy is soon to appear. What does RJ think of the 'heads having elected Babbage [Charles Babbage elected to the Lucasian Chair] and how do you suppose he will take it?' George Peacock, Higman and WW wrote letters to each of the electors - 'so I shall be vexed if he is not gratified and now that he has no wife he may perhaps better like to live here part of the year'.

William Whewell to Richard Jones

Trinity College - What is RJ hesitating about now? He should give WW some of his manuscripts and let him get hold of the press syndicate as soon as possible [RJ, 'An Essay on the Distribution of Wealth, and on the Sources of Taxation: Part 1. - Rent', 1831].

William Whewell to Richard Jones

Trinity College - WW has heard that RJ will be coming into this neighbourhood, and therefore wants to make sure he is around when RJ visits Cambridge. WW hopes RJ is getting his manuscript ready to show the University press syndicate ['An Essay on the Distribution of Wealth, and on the Sources of Taxation: Part 1. - Rent', 1831]. Can RJ give WW the reference to the book in which he saw 'a short list of the alteration in prices of corn pushed by the increase or diminution of the supply in certain propositions. It was in some book of the age of Petty's [William Petty] Political arithmetic'. WW is 'thinking of putting some propositions of Political Economy for instance those in Thompson's [Thomas Perronet Thompson, 'The True Theory of Rent, in Opposition to Mr. Ricardo and Others', 1826] works in a mathematical form. The more I think of it the more likely this appears to be convenient to mathematicians. I expect nothing new from this but some avoidance of confusion. As to Thompson's book you are no doubt right that it takes the case of money rents only, but it pretends not to take more; and it appears to me that with regard to them he has demonstratively shewn the Ricardists to be wrong so clearly that I am persuaded they will soon be compelled, (that is as soon as they have any writers who are not muddleheaded,) to abandon this part of their theory'.

William Whewell to Richard Jones

London - WW gives his positive opinion of John Herschel's recent bride [Margaret Herschel]. WW was safely elected to the University Club [see WW to RJ, 19 Feb. 1829]. He has 'been putting on paper and reading at the Philosophical Society my mathematico-politico-economics, and I am really rather pleased with the look of my lucubrations. I shall privately have it finished (as one of our papers) and send it to the Economists whom I know by way of challenge. It does not much interfere with your speculations but I know very much that it will bear traces of what I have learnt from you, especially in the boldness with which I doubt the accuracy of the orthodox economists. It is in fact for the most part Thompson's [Thomas Perronet Thompson] book on Rent translated into formula' ['The True Theory of Rent, in Opposition to Mr. Ricardo and Others', 1826]. WW's 'object is to shew the mode of applying mathematics so as to separate difficulties of calculation from difficulties of moral reasoning - to keep apart the business of reasoning up to principles and down from them'. He wants some statements concerned with land, produce and rent: 'I have told you I do not want accuracy but definiteness'.

William Whewell to Richard Jones

Rastadt - WW was captivated by the churches of Cologne but disappointed with the buildings in the Netherlands. The churches have 'just resemblance enough with our churches of the 11th century to enable us to class them'. WW has seen 'some of the earliest and most gorgeous specimens of the completely formed Gothic, as the cathedral at Cologne; so that the series though not clearly perfect, is very full and almost satisfactory'.

William Whewell to Richard Jones

WW sends his corrections to one of RJ's printed sheets ['An Essay on the Distribution of Wealth, and on the Sources of Taxation: Part 1. - Rent', 1831]. He has also scrutinized the manuscript and made some changes. WW is not convinced by RJ's 'argument to shew that a creation of rent arising from a rise in raw produce diminishes the share of the producers[,] it seems to me that you only shew that it diminishes the share of the consumers and that a link or two is wanting'. RJ should leave all the talk concerning the value of metals in different countries to Ricardo and Malthus. 'The rent is clear enough and I think will interest' - although WW thinks RJ should, wherever possible, relate the argument to the bearing it has on this or some other country: 'it is the most obvious way to attract and enliven and will prevent your being as dull as the corresponding parts of Ricardo which you cannot afford to be because your results are not so paradoxical as his - moreover you write diabolically - and have I really think got an impediment in your writing by way of compensation for the glibness of your tongue'.

William Whewell to Richard Jones

Trinity College - WW advises RJ that he should have a break and a new heading on one of his pages in the proofs to his book ['An Essay on the Distribution of Wealth, and on the Sources of Taxation: Part 1. - Rent', 1831].

William Whewell to Richard Jones

Trinity College - WW is annoyed that RJ has not sent more of his work: 'Still you promise and still nothing comes of it. Your tomorrow means a week' ['An Essay on the Distribution of Wealth, and on the Sources of Taxation: Part 1. - Rent', 1831]. WW likes the sound of RJ's current speculations but is sceptical that he would ever get round to publishing them: 'If they turn into equations they will answer my purpose admirably after they have answered yours'.

William Whewell to Richard Jones

Trinity College - RJ should look over and send back the last sheet WW sent him, so he can give it to the printers ['An Essay on the Distribution of Wealth, and on the Sources of Taxation: Part 1. - Rent', 1831]. No more sheets of manuscript have come through. Once WW knows RJ's plans he will be glad to see if a house near the college can be found for him.

William Whewell to Richard Jones

Trinity College - WW thinks RJ has made the right decision in 'the matter of publishing' [limiting his first book to rent - see WW to RJ, 21 May 1830: 'An Essay on the Distribution of Wealth, and on the Sources of Taxation: Part 1. - Rent', 1831]: 'It will save you and me the endless annoyances and impossibilities which we incur by trying to print a book which is still to write, as if it were already written'. WW is grateful for RJ pointing out Dupin's [Charles Dupin] speculations: 'Do you not see that they are all mere mathematical consequences of Gregory King's [probably King's 'Natural and Political Observations and conclusions Upon the State and Condition of England', 1696] talk of the dependence of price on quantity which I told you was necessary for all mathematical working? They appear to me very useless on the account you mention and on some others which I will explain to you some day. I have still a great hankering after my plan of driving the dogmatical school of political economy into their proper region of mathematics, and a growing conviction of the possibility of doing this with great profit'.

William Whewell to Richard Jones

Trinity College - WW thinks RJ's preface is excellent and has given it to the printers ['An Essay on the Distribution of Wealth, and on the Sources of Taxation: Part 1. - Rent', 1831]. As to the latter pages WW advises RJ to 'remodel the last two pages (no more) or omit them'. He thinks 'the account of your part of the country is as bad as it can be among people pretending to an established order of society...However never despair - we will live through the storm and teach the world wise things when the winds have lulled again'.

William Whewell to Richard Jones

WW gives his criticisms of RJ's manuscript sheets ['An Essay on the Distribution of Wealth, and on the Sources of Taxation: Part 1. - Rent', 1831]: 'one or two parts are possibly of too sustained a tone'.

William Whewell to Richard Jones

London - WW sends a few more corrections for RJ to make to his preface ['An Essay on the Distribution of Wealth, and on the Sources of Taxation: Part 1. - Rent', 1831]. WW agrees with RJ 'entirely as to the importance of the distinction between the mode of incidence of moral and physical will but I do not see why you should be dissatisfied with the way in which you have expressed it'. WW has been working at his inductive history of chemistry: 'I never spend half an hour on the subject without making out something new and pertinent'. He is 'disposed to be of your opinion with regard to the R.S. [John Herschel losing the election to become President of the Royal Society] and so far as I can make out all Herschel's friends are disposed to give the old lady over...What will come of this I do not exactly see nor much care'.

William Whewell to Richard Jones

Trinity College - When WW last wrote he had not seen the article on RJ in the Quarterly Review: 'I think you have great good luck in escaping out of my hands for I had not ventured to say so broadly what I supposed your plan to be though I expected to leave nearly the same impression, and I certainly never dreamt of quoting you to the extent to which Lockhart's [John Lockhart] established reviewer has done...I am quite sure both from what he says to me and still more from the inscrutable manner in which the whole business of the Review is carried on that he is very far from absolute, and that there is some greater power behind his editorial throne'. WW thinks that RJ's success among the existing political economists, will depend greatly 'on its being explained to them what you are supposed to have different from their doctrine'. If RJ wants 'candid and thinking readers you must go to Germany'. The master of Trinity - Christopher Wordsworth - 'is delighted' with RJ's book ['An Essay on the Distribution of Wealth, and on the Sources of Taxation: Part 1. - Rent', 1831] and impatient for the next volume on wages. WW gives his comments on the review of Whately [Richard Whately].

William Whewell to Richard Jones

Trinity College - RJ has not yet told WW what he thinks of his 'Theophysics' ['Astronomy and General Physics Considered with Reference to Natural Theology', 1833]: 'it much concerns me to know what you think'. Because 'the dogmatical and deductive spirit of the present generation of economists it appears to me that it might be worth while to cut their meat for them and stuff it in their mouths that they might masticate it after their own fashion...your great business is to teach what is true, and will be so when Ricardists and McCullochites have become like Aristotelians and Canterians now are'.

William Whewell to Richard Jones

Trinity College - Printed letter written by Joseph Romilly with the date for the election of a new University Registrary. Further to RJ possibly being offered the professorship in political economy at King's College [see WW to RJ, 16 March 1832]: 'It appears that some of the managers of the College were dissatisfied with some of Senior's [Nassau Senior] published opinions (I believe about Irish Bishops etc) and this I suppose has led to his resignation. If they offer it you it will be because they think your opinions will be such as they will better like, and because they still wish to have the eclat of a good professor on the subject'.

William Whewell to Richard Jones

Trinity College - Further to RJ's desire to be appointed the next Professor of Political Economy at King's College (see WW to RJ, 12 April 1832): 'I am rather vexed at the stupidity of the King's College people, and I am moreover rather vexed to find that you have set your heart upon the matter more than I thought'. RJ should just concentrate on getting his book on wages finished - 'you would soon reach a stage in which their whims would be of no consequence to you and your determinations would be something to them'.

William Whewell to Richard Jones

Trinity College - WW is sorry RJ ever got involved with the Professorship in Political Economy at King's College: 'it is now very clear that it will either never come at all, or will come in such a way as to be no great advantage or comfort to you'. WW is more concerned at 'the danger of your publication of your next volume being retarded by it'. WW does not see a chance 'of any one doing what you would do for the science, soon, or I could almost say, ever. To bring the facts of the historical and economical condition of nations under general laws, when once done will never be forgotten, and the effects of such a view will be forthwith and forever operative...It is the only way too, to bring common practice and common sympathy within sight of sound theory'. If he does not continue he will be remembered as a young author extinguished by J. R. McCulloch. As for 'Whately [Richard Whately] and his logic you may neglect him or kick hm as you like. You will of course soon be as completely out of his reach as a man who walks forwards is of a man who stands still and prances'. WW has finished his Bridgewater treatise ['Astronomy and General Physics Considered with Reference to Natural Theology', 1833] and sent it to the Bishop of London and the President of the Royal Society to examine.

William Whewell to Richard Jones

RJ is lacking in pluck and is putting himself 'into an immense fidget about whether you are to have half a dozen more or fewer auditors which is a purely unessential circumstance'. WW does not understand what RJ means by the failure of his lecture ['An Introductory Lecture on Political Economy to which is Added a Syllabus of Lectures on the Wages of Labour', 1833]: 'What amount of success will satisfy you? If you expect that the whole lecture room should rush from their seats and lift you in their arms declaring you the emperor of economists, the thing will not be done. People will even retain many of their prejudices. Time and Right, past friends but slow travellers, must work for you before you can have justice'.

William Whewell to Richard Jones

Trinity College - WW would be curious to know how RJ has 'found it convenient to deliver your doctrines for the benefit of a King's College audience and also what kind of audience such a one is'.

William Whewell to Richard Jones

WW wanted to talk to RJ about his statistical section in the BAAS: 'I want to see setting to work in a reasonable and promising manner. I do not think the best mode to proceed is by advertisement '. A copy of the section's resolutions should be sent to all persons who seemed likely to be worth the trouble. After this they may 'develop and systematize' each of their 5 subject areas: 'I am myself much disposed to thumb my fingers into your economical statistics, but I have so much else to do I will avoid it if I can'.

William Whewell to Richard Jones

Trinity College - WW never actually got to London: 'I set off for the coast on Friday intending to see how the coast guard took up the orders of the Admiralty which were issued at my suggestion and finding that everything furnished well along the shore of Suffolk I thought I could not do better than come back and write philosophy'. WW expects he will 'have a postscript to my pamphlet ['Remarks on some parts of Mr. Thirlwall's letter on the Admission of Dissenters to Academical Degrees', 1834. See WW to RJ, 28 May 1834] to write for I find that Thirlwall is charging another pistol which he will let off in a day or two ['A Letter to the Rev. Thomas Turton, on the Admission of Dissenters to Academical Degrees', 2nd edn., to which is added a 2nd letter containing a vindication of some passages in the first letter', 1834]. I expect that I shall find it necessary to let off something in return. I was very glad that you liked the tone of my last and I shall probably keep the same ground in my reply' ['Additional Remarks on Mr Thirlwall's Letter...of Academical Degrees', 1834].

Results 1 to 30 of 5414