Showing 57 results

Archival description
Sanger, Charles Percy (1871-1930) barrister
Print preview View:

Letter from A. Dorothea Sanger (née Pease) to Nora Sidgwick

Does not wish to intrude upon Nora, but wishes her to know what a real personal sorrow she feels at the death of Henry Sidgwick. It was he more than any other person who made Cambridge what it was and is to her: 'a source of the best sort of inspiration', which she got from his lectures. Says that he made her love him personally, 'as well as almost reverence him.' Adds that her husband wishes Nora to know that he too 'had all this feeling for Dr. Sidgwick'.

Sanger, Anna Dorothea (1865-1955) wife of Charles Percy Sanger

Letter from Bertrand Russell to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Beacon Hill School, Harting, Petersfield. - Thanks Bessie for her kind letter; the Russells are now over their anxiety about [their daughter] Kate who has now completely recovered. The operation was late in the evening of the 23rd so Kate had 'a pretty miserable Christmas', but enjoyed her birthday on the 29th. Dora got sciatica from getting out of bed on cold nights to look after her, and is now in London having it dealt with. According to the surgeons there has been an 'epidemic of mastoids as a consequence of influenza', and there has been another case at the school, but that is also no longer serious. They all remember the Christmas they spent at the Shiffolds; John will never forget Julian's electric train. They often hear of the Trevelyans through Charlie Sanger; invites them to visit, as it is a very easy car journey and he thinks they would enjoy seeing the children.

Letter from C. P. Sanger to R. C. Trevelyan

58 Oakley Street, Chelsea, S.W. - Booksellers are 'disposed to deny all knowledge' of Bob's book ["Sisyphus"] and say it is 'not on Longman's list: Bob should 'stir up' his publishers. Has managed to get hold of it and thinks it 'much the best thing' Bob has done, though the 'queer metres & methods of scansion', which he supposes are influenced by [Robert] Bridges, are sometimes puzzling. Doubts however whether 'bigamy had been made a felony in the time of Sisyphus'. Hopes that Bessie and Paul are well.

Letter from C. P. Sanger to R. C. Trevelyan

3, Hare Court, Inner Temple. - Thinks Bob cannot be 'in love a bit' - he is 'so disgustingly reasonable'; why is he thinking about 'acting wisely' when he should be feeling that he does not 'care a damn whether [he is] or not'. George has only seen [Elizabeth] once, and still gave him a 'much more favourable description' than Bob had managed with his '"tolerably accomplished for a young lady" and all that sort of thing'. Cannot ever remember being really pleased before that one of his friends was going to be married; hopes it will make Bob 'work properly which will be a splendid thing'. Asks him to send 'accurate details as to intellect & views of life of Miss van [der] Hoeven'. Expects it's 'still a secret'; announced it at the [Apostles] Society, and also told Goldie [Lowes Dickinson] on Sunday, who 'said "Good God!"' but Sanger supposes he will have 'sufficiently recovered from his astonishment' by now to write. All 'fog & rain & general damnation' here, with the 'climax of [Sanger's] miseries' being the party his mother is going to give, to which she will invite his friends and they will accept; asks if Bob agrees with his own loathing of parties, and hopes that 'there won't be many in hell'. Has not yet seen McT[aggart]'s wife, but reports of her are so 'rediculously [sic] favourable' that he is bound to be disappointed when he does. Has reclaimed something [illegible] for Bob, having 'meekly paid the money' as he 'felt too lazy to make a fuss'. Sends love to Roger and regards to Mrs Fry.

Letter from C. P. Sanger to R. C. Trevelyan

Trinity College, Cambridge. - Is very glad for Bob's happiness. Had felt that he was 'restless & unsatisfied' about his work or something else, and sometimes thought it 'would be the best thing possible' for him to marry, but did not think this would happen as he thought Bob was 'not that kind of person'. Very glad that he is, and that he will now feel 'life is quite magnificent' and be able to write his poetry and 'not feel lonely'. Regarding the lady Bob has spoken of to him [Lina Duff Gordon: see e.g. 9/96], thinks Bob should 'write to her at one as an intimate friend saying that she will no doubt be interested' to hear about his engagement, 'making no reference to the possibility that she might have cared about [him]', as if she is in love with him she should hear as soon as possible that it is 'hopeless', and he thinks it would be 'nicer for her' to hear directly from Bob, not as gossip; tells him to 'write nicely'. If she does not care for him, it will still be 'polite', and help them to stay friends; understands he 'values her friendship'. He will tell people in the [Apostles] Society this evening. Asks him to pass on congratulations to Miss Van der Hoeven and tell her he thinks she is 'very fortunate' and that he is 'really rather cross with her' as now he will not see so much of Bob, and feels he will miss him 'dreadfully'. Does not think Bob's descriptions are 'enthusiastic' enough; perhaps he thought Sanger might 'scoff' if he 'rave[d] too much'; in fact he rather 'shocked' him by 'being able to write so reasonably'. Has been 'fighting the damned clerical [?]' all afternoon, and there was a 'good moral victory' as they 'only just missed the necessary 2/3 majority''. Realises now how 'very terrible' the [Second Boer] war must be for Bob, and hopes he has not said anything to 'really hurt' him.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Happy to go with Elizabeth to see the doctor; says she should make the appointment herself and gives Mrs Scharlieb's Harley Street address. Will be back in London on Monday. Glad Elizabeth is going; believes the doctor is 'very able in all such matters. A real pity the dress will not fit. Sir George is recovered from his [rheumatic] 'feverishness' now. Aunt Margaret [Holland] cannot have them on the 13th, and Sir George will not go in Ascot week, so thinks their visit will fall through; asks if they could still visit Elizabeth and Robert for a day as Sir George 'seems anxious for it'. Will 'ask the Sangers &c' but fears she is now 'getting too full'.

Letter from Crompton Llewelyn Davies to R. C. Trevelyan

14 Barton St. - Is anxious to hear whether Trevelyan has secured the Swan at Fittleworth, and whether there will be room for the whole party (see also 2/32 and 2/34). As well as the names mentioned by Trevelyan, Henry Dakyns will come, and Sanger is encouraging Dakyns' father and [brother] Arthur to come; Sanger has also encouraged Davies to invite Whitehead, and North [Whitehead] may come too. Davies has invited Vaughan Williams to join them as well.

Letter from Desmond MacCarthy to R. C. Trevelyan

Trinity College, Cambridge. - Is leaving Cambridge today so is glad Trevelyan is not coming. Cannot come to stay but thinks he can visit for the day. The world has been very kind to him recently so he will be good company. Hears Trevelyan's tragedy, which he expects was the one he was working on at Blackgang Chine ["Cecilia Gonzaga"?] is finished. Has spent the whole week in Cambridge, talking, and is looking forward to an evening alone; feels his desired ratio of company to solitude is that of 'whisky to water'. Is waiting for Sanger. Moore is very well and 'has defined metaphysics as the science of what doesn't exist'. Went to a ball last night, with plenty of young ladies and ice creams; got 'practically engaged'.

Letter from E. M. Forster to R. C. Trevelyan

Harnham, Monument Green, Weybridge; addressed to Trevelyan at Pensione Palumba, Ravello. - Has seen Miss Vaughan Williams, who has received a letter from Elizabeth Trevelyan. Writes to hear all the news from Italy. Is lecturing in Guildford next term, and possibly Cornwall. Has been to see Sanger, who was attacking the Pragmatists such as William James. Is working on a ghost story, "The Purple Envelope", which he intends for "Temple Bar". Has been to "The Confederacy" twice, and to "The Maid's Tragedy". If Trevelyan goes to Pesto [Paestum], asks to be remembered to the station master Amilcare Sabbattini. His 'largest' cousin has married 'a man with a crest', which he attaches.

Letter from Edward Marsh to R. C. Trevelyan

Grimsby Farm, Long Lane, Coldash, Newbury. - Hopes Trevy has received the letter he wrote to Naples, otherwise he will think Marsh 'rather a beast'. Glad Corpo di Cava was not snowed under, since it has turned out to be 'so delightful'; he himself would have 'preferred Capri for the sake of Tiberius' [see 15/318]. Has just got away from London and finished his first day of work here; his 'flesh crept to such a degree' when he woke on Monday night and started to think about his tripos [examinations] that it 'must have moved on about an inch all round'. Stayed in London a little longer than he should have done because of a 'superior French company' who performed [Ibsen's] "Rosmersholm" and "Master Builder" and a play by Maeterlinck under the direction of M. [Aurélien-François-Marie] Lugné -Poé who 'seems to be a descendant of Edgar Poe'. He is 'a very beautiful man with a pale face & black hair', and reminds Marsh of a 'portrait of some poet', perhaps Poe himself; he 'acts very respectably' and played the Master Builder as 'an American with a straggling beard & a drunken complexion' and 'quite revolutionized' Marsh's idea of the part, since 'the rather vulgar arrogant manner he put on in certain parts' made the character seem more consistent than 'the suavity of Lewis Waller'. Asks if Trevy has ever read Maeterlinck, as it is 'useless to try and explain what he's like' if not; in the 'mixture of great simplicity with an entire rejection of realism' he thinks it goes back to 'the Burne Jones & Morris kind of thing'. Sat next to William Archer, who was 'very nice' to him. Saw many friends at the Ibsen plays: [Erskine] Childers, Crompton [Llewelyn Davies], Gerald Duckworth, J[ohn] Waldegrave, 'the Babe' [William Haynes Smith?] etc. Thinks the Independent Theatre must be 'the worst managed concern in the world': the performances usually begin late 'after the curtain has gone up two or three times, to encourage the audience. You're never safe from the irruption of a cat in the most moving scenes', the actors miss their cues, or the curtain does not go down at the end of the act. The man who is called the Acting Manager [Charles Hoppe] is 'the greatest crook [he] ever met with in a responsible position', who seems unable to sell tickets without asking for assistance and did not even know how many acts there were in "Rosmersholm". Marsh took the Verralls to that play; comments on Arthur Verrall's reaction to theatre: 'he never is, or lays himself out to be, in the least moved by a play' but responds to 'the cleverness or stupidity with which it is written'.

Very glad that George [Trevelyan] got his scholarship, though there was no doubt he and Buxton would; 'very hard luck on [Ralph] Wedgwood. Went to see [Charles] Sanger yesterday in his new rooms at Hare Court. No-one has heard 'anything of [Bertrand] Russell for some time'. Only saw Oswald [Sickert], who had influenza, not serious, once; he has just got 'free from the Werner Company, which has used up the Beauties of Britain, & gone on to Paris [ie, finished publishing "Beautiful Britain]'; hopes he will have time for his novel now. [Maurice] Baring took Marsh to supper with Edmund Gosse on Sunday: a 'most amusing man', whose conversation is 'described in Stevenson's essay on conversation ["Talk and Talkers"] under the name of Purcell. He was in the teakettle mood'. Met [Henry] Harland, the editor of the "Yellow Book" there; thought him 'an awful little man', but 'on getting accustomed to his manner' next day he thought him 'like-able on the whole'. Hopes to go to supper next Sunday with 'the even more distinguished [Robert] Bridges', though he has not read his recent works so 'feels rather ill-equipped'. Met John Davidson briefly recently; he 'seemed a genial and light hearted little man, with a nice Scotch accent'.

Letter from Edward Marsh to R. C. Trevelyan

30, Bruton Street, W. - The news of Bob's engagement was 'most exciting and delightful'; found the letter as he was leaving home and was 'so thrilled by the first words that [he] read it under a lamppost, as Mr Gladstone read "Treasure Island"'. Bob's description is 'perfect', and Marsh has 'already chosen the costume to imagine [him] in, which will make [him] a Jarburg [?] young gentleman to the life'. Looks forward to meeting 'Mrs Bob', and as Bob says is sure they will have no trouble in making friends. Hopes Bob will draw as 'attractive a picture' of Marsh to her. Afraid this will give Bob an 'added reason for being miserable abt this awful war [the Second Boer War'; thinks he is lucky to be remote from news. The 'third bad defeat this week was announced this morning': London is 'deeply gloomy', all the conversation in the street is about the war, and his own 'official circle is even more despondent than the rest of the world'. This though makes it 'all the pleasanter' to think of Bob's happy feelings. Wishes he had said more of his future plans; hopes he will soon return to [his fiancée's] 'marshy fatherland'; wonders whether he will settle in England or near Amsterdam 'as Sanger hopes' and 'received the Brethren [Cambridge Apostles] from Saturday to Monday].

Letter from Edward Marsh to R. C. Trevelyan

Trinity College, Cambridge. - Has been 'distracted all day' by Trevy's letter [15/269]; is afraid his mind is 'made up against his wishes', since there are many reasons against him going to Italy with Trevy and for it only that he 'should like it so enormously'. His tripos exams are in May and he must work for them; knows he would not be able to work at Paestum; he has already refused to go to with [Nathaniel] Wedd to Greece, with [Charles] Sanger and [Arthur] Shipley to the Netherlands, and with [Maurice?] Baring to Florence. Has also asked James to come to London in Easter week, and wants to see lots of other people there. Will pass over what Trevy says in his letter about [his theories on] the English language, but hopes that both of them have 'improved since that fearful day at Mottarone'. Barran has come in 'in all his customary magnificence' they had great fun at the Verralls' last night. Has got to take tea with 'the little Miss Conybeare's [sisters of his college contemporary William Conybeare?] now'.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, Hague'; addressed to Bob at The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking, Surrey. - Thinks Bob's arrangements about the piano 'quite perfect & quite the nicest we could have' and trusts the 'professional friend' to choose the upright one. Would like to write and thank Bob's aunt [Margaret Price] for her present, so asks for her address. Thanks Bob for sending the table measurements, as well as the lock of his hair, which she will keep in his "Pilgrim's Progress". Describes a dream she had about him, and another about Dr [Empedocle?] Gaglio - probably as Bramine [Hubrecht] had mentioned him in a letter. Sorry that Sanger is still unwell and the likely cause [love]; he is 'the last person who ought to be treated like that'; asks if 'the lady in question is Miss D. P. [Dorothea Pease]'. Confesses his jokes about regretting not being able to go to Greece with his friends any more made her cry; she has often been anxious that he will lose a great deal of freedom when he marries; surely he will be able to talk as freely with his friends after they marry; she would like to go to Greece with him. Glad Bargman gave good advice [about the house]; hopes 'dear little Gussie [Enticknap]' will not make too much noise. Her uncle's lawyer has not yet heard from the 'Paris oracle Mr Barclay' about the marriage. The Grandmonts likely to be there; so now thinks they should fix the wedding for Whit week and will write to Bob's mother if her agrees; asks if he has a preference about the day; suggests not Wednesday as then 'all the servants are married together & there usually is a great rush'. Interrupted by a visit from her friend Anna de Ravity [?], with whom she had a good talk; Anna 'talked most sensibly about the [Second Boer] war' and is 'disgusted' by the general wild anti-British sentiment here. Is going to see her sister Marie in Rotterdam tomorrow. Tells Bob not to leave his books and manuscripts around, or 'the wood nymphs' might steal them; would write a poem on the subject if she could; wishes they lived in the time of the "Arabian Nights" so she could use a magic carpet or flying trunk to come to see him.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

The Hague. - Does not think Bob ought to wait longer than Wednesday night to come, even if the papers are not yet ready; will meet him at the station on Thursday morning and they can have a quiet day to themselves, their 'private marriage day'. On Friday morning she will be busy with people who are moving her belongings; they will have to go to the Town House [Stadhuis] that day to declare their intention to marry so that the 'publication' [ondertrouw] can take place on the next two Sundays. Has her last lesson [with Eldering] at Amsterdam on Saturday, and wants to go to the Röntgens for the last time with Bob and stay the night, if he does not mind staying in a hotel; on Sunday they must take the 'alto violin' to Mrs Asser, who has moved from Leiden to Haarlem, and can show them her Japanese prints on silk. Has been tearing up her old school exercise books, but has kept some. This afternoon, is going to say goodbye at the Children's Hospital where she used to teach. The Salomonsons are staying at the Hotel Cecil; Jeanne would be 'immensely pleased' if Bob could call on them briefly. Asks Bob to give [Charles Percy] Sanger her 'warmest congratulations'; he is a very good friend to follow Bob's example so soon [in getting engaged to Dora Pease].

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, the Hague; addressed to Bob at 3 Hare Court, Inner Temple, London E.C. - Asks if Bob really had the vision he describes in his letter or whether he is just amusing her; talks about their ritual of 'kissing the wall' before sleep; sends a lock of her hair and asks for one of Bob's in return. Thanks him for his explanation of his sonnet in "The Speaker", which she now understands. Returns to the letter after some business over shares at the bank with her uncle, which they were both glad to finish. Discussion of post times. Foolish of "The Speaker" not to put Bob's translation in; asks if he is going to send the "[Lady's] Bat" or anything else to the "Spectator" or "Athenaeum". Discussion of arrangements for the house. Asks who Sophie, who has offered to give Bob a set of books, is; Bob ought to decide what he would like; asks if he has a complete set of Browning in Smith and Elder's edition; she does not like Meredith enough and the Frys have a set, but if Bob is a great admirer he should ask for that. Hope [Charles] Sanger feels better; asks about Bob's lease on the Temple rooms, and whether he is still keeping daily accounts or whether he has not opened his account book since they 'sat together in Charles' room one morning at Grosvenor Crescent'; does not like to nag but he must think about such things.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, the Hague. - Received the letter Bob wrote on Friday this morning, which did her 'a great deal of good': she needs to be told that it is not worth getting depressed over little things on the 'frontier of [their] promised land'; will try to stay calm and wait to hear from his parents in response to her letter to his father. Last night she talked the matter [whether to invite Sir Henry Howard to the wedding] over with her uncle again; he still has objections but did not come to any firm conclusion, and they agreed it would be best to wait until Bob's arrival. Sir George's letter, though, may 'upset all', as she would have to explain to her uncle and aunt about his decision [not to come to the wedding] if he does not change his mind. Does not think Bob realises that it would then look as if his father was 'mortally offended & angry', and her uncle would be sure to take it that way, which might lead to a 'brouille [quarrel]' between them. She has seen the misery of quarrels often in her life and would be very sorry if anything of the kind took place. Tells Bob he ought not to miss the [Cambridge] Apostles' dinner on 13 June; they could perhaps go to Blackdown for a while so he could go to Cambridge for it; will be 'a great thing' for him to be there 'so soon after [he has] obtained the dignity of a married man'. Is glad about [Charles] Sanger but wants to hear more.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Written on Trinity College, Cambridge, headed notepaper. - [Charles] Sanger told him about [Robert's engagement] last night. Saw [Elizabeth] in Sicily long ago, and remembers 'she is strikingly intellectual, and also very sensible and with a look of character'; she has been 'brought up severely well' and he is sure 'she knows what she is about'. Thinks it likely that 'it is quite an exceptional chance for the peculiarities required'; does not know how much Robert is in love as has not yet heard from him, but 'think[s] it is all right'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

1, Garden Court, Temple, E. C. - Originally enclosing [Warre?] Cornish's article; asks Bob to acknowledge receipt if he does not send it back at once; if Bob could give his opinion this might help them [the editors of the "Independent Review?"] to form their judgment. Sends love to Bessie. Postscript on back of the letter informs Bob that Crompton [Llewelyn Davies] has gone to France with [Bertrand] Russell; he seemed 'much better [emphasized] before he left' [referring to Crompton having recently lost his brother Theodore]. The Sangers are expecting the birth of a baby in around October.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R.C. Trevelyan

Union Society, Cambridge. - Is sending the books. They talk here of 'nothing but the School board now': McT[aggart] is 'Rileyite of course', but Sanger and Dickinson are opposed to him. Is going to the [Harrow] 'Old Boy's' on 1 December, and asks if Bob will also be there; also asks what there will be to see in London around the 12th, and whether Bob will be at Wallington at all this vacation. Is appreciating Wordsworth for the first time, in Matthew Arnold's selection, the only way he has found so far of 'getting at him through the mass of rubbish with which he surrounded his throne'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R.C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Left the vest he borrowed from Bob in Sanger's rooms; thinks he left his razor strop at Haslemere and if so 'bequeath[s]' it as a present. Had a good day's shooting yesterday with John and Thornton. Clear that there will be peace for at least a few months [after the Fashoda Incident], though 'there is perhaps more permanent danger of war than there used to be'.

Letter from Gerald Shove to R. C. Trevelyan

Bankes' Arms Hotel, Studland, Wareham. - Has taken rooms for a week at Agglestone House, Studland [Dorset], which is 'rather a beastly sort of "lodging-house"' but it is very hard to get accommodation in this area. Since the station, at Swanage, is around four miles away and transport has to be sent specially it would be 'more convenient and cheaper' if as many people as possible could arrive together. [C.P] Sanger and [Ralph?] Hawtrey come on Thursday; has not yet had any answer from Bertie [Russell] or Crompton [Llewelyn Davies]; [Saxon] Sydney-Turner cannot come. Asks Trevelyan which train he will arrive by, and how much luggage he will bring; would be possible to leave luggage at the station to be collected and walk to Studland.

Letter from Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson to R. C. Trevelyan

13A Hanover Terrace Ladbroke Grove. - Is sceptical about the translation of his books into German. Sorry to hear that Trevelyan has had mumps; hopes he has now recovered. At heart is miserable about the state of Europe; distractions include dinner with Clive [Bell?] and [Ralph?] Hawtrey, and the new letters of Byron, which he discusses at length with comments on morality. Has also been reading the 'absurd' book ["Home Life with Herbert Spencer"]. Morgan [Forster] has returned, unhappy because he cannot write (with which Trevelyan will sympathise). Met Bertie [Russell] and his wife at the Sangers'; does not think he will like 'Mrs Bertie'. Mrs [Beatrice] Mayor's two plays ["The Girl and the City" and "Thirty Minutes in a Street"] were acted on Sunday; supposes they were not much of a success but he was interested by them, particularly that acted by her sister [Betty Potter]. Has had long walk with [Nathaniel] Wedd who is 'gallant' but not well; Dickinson sceptical about the psychoanalysis he is receiving. Sends best regards to Trevelyan and his hosts.

Letter from J. Ellis McTaggart to R. C. Trevelyan

Trinity College, Cambridge. - Has just heard from [Charles] Sanger about Bob's 'great news [his engagement]'. he and his wife, 'after three and a half weeks experience, have agreed that marriage is even nicer than we had expected'; trusts that Bob will find the same as the '[Apostles] Society doesn't make mistakes in its marriages'. Did not catch Bob's fiancée's name, but asks him to tell her that 'many people will be eager to welcome her to Cambridge'; his wife also 'takes on herself' to send congratulations, since 'if your brother's wife is not your sister, she is at least not an alien'.

Letter from Oswald Valentine Sickert to R. C. Trevelyan

12 Pembroke Gardens, Kensington, W. - Has been wanting to ask Trevelyan's opinion about starting a weekly magazine [the "Cambridge Observer"]; hears from [Eddie] Marsh that he is optimistic. Wishes he had been in [Arthur?] Tansley's room on the last day of term, when there was an 'air of keenness'. The plan is for a serious magazine, with 'no conventional fun about proginses & bedders & Newhamites"; admires Carr B. very much but thinks he is well represented already while 'more serious people' are not. Problem with finding a good editor; feels a committee would solve this problem, though he knows Trevelyan does not agree; discusses how it might work. The paper would consist of: remarks on events; reviews; poetry or a story; a political or philosophical essay; 'an article on the Town by a Townee'; Oxford correspondence; athletics; Newnham & Girton. The town correspondent is to be Mrs Rye, a 'very hard-working clever Liberal' and a member of the Board of Guardians, whom Trevelyan's brother knows. Hoping to get [Cyril Mowbray?] Wells to write on athletics. Is sending a prospectus to Tansley, [Bertrand] Russell and [Charles] Sanger, who are very keen, and hopes to distribute this (with their corrections) on the first day of term with the paper following the week after. Thinks Palmer will do the printing.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague. - Has received her letter this morning, and sent a telegraph to say he has already written to all [the friends and relations] she names, as well as to a few others, such as Mrs [Mary] Booth, since she had invited him to Gracedieu for New Year's Day. Wrote to [Charles] Sanger first, as he lives with him, who got the letter at Cambridge and told George there; had however written to George, and Charles, next day. Has also written to his aunts and Booa [Mary Prestwich]. Has been busy: Mr Hubrecht sent him to visit Bessie's sister Mrs Röntgen in Amsterdam on Saturday, on Sunday he received callers with the family, and on Monday he went to Ede with her and her sister-in-law [strictly, Elizabeth had no sister-in-law: Bramine Hubrecht meant?] to see about the furniture moving. Thinks his mother will have seen his and Hubrecht's letters to his father; hopes that 'little difficulty' is now resolved. Elizabeth is about five foot ten, has 'brownish yellow hair, of rather a light tint', and eyes of he thinks 'greenish grey'. Has not yet written her any poems, but 'must try in Italy'. Will try to get her a ring in Milan; [Roger] Fry may be able to help; leaves tomorrow afternoon, and will spend a few days there as he has much to discuss with Fry. Not sure when he will return: depends how his work goes. Hopes a visit by Bessie to England in the spring can be arranged.

Results 1 to 30 of 57