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Fry, Roger Eliot (1866-1934) painter and art critic
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Autobiographical sketch by R. C. Trevelyan

Describes: his studies at Cambridge; brief time as a pupil in the chambers of T. E. Scrutton, which would have been a 'great privilege and opportunity' if he had only had 'any talent for the law'; a long holiday at Corpo di Cava in southern Italy to recover from influenza, where he began to write a 'long, rambling... romantic modern novel' on the theme of incest, inspired by Ibsen's "Little Eyolf; outdoor composition; his turn to writing poetry, in which he was encouraged by Roger Fry.

Pencil notes at the back of the book sketching out further topics for the autobiographical account, such as [Thomas] Sturge Moore; 'Taormina - Bessie - Mrs [Florence] Cacciola - Holland'; writing the libretto [for the "Bride of Dionysus"] for Donald Tovey; his translation of Aeschylus; Welcombe [his inheritance of the house from his mother?]; at the bottom of this page, the other way up, there is the beginning of an account of a gentleman living 'not long since, in one of the northern counties of England'.

Draft letter from R. C. Trevelyan to [Jean Marchand]

On headed notepaper of the National Liberal Club, Victoria Street, S.W.1. - On returning to London, he talked to Ruth Fry, Roger's sister, who is the president of the 'Mission des Amis' [Friends War Victims Relief Committee]. She said that communication with Russia was very difficult at the moment, but that if Marchand wants to arrange to get his niece [actually Olga Lewitska, daughter of Sonia Lewitska -see 22/56] out of Ukraine, it would be best to write to [Maxim] Litvinoff at the Hotel Cosmopolite, Copenhagen, asking for his help and advice as the one responsible for admitting foreigners to Russia and getting them out. Ruth Fry doubted that Litvinoff would consent to helping with such a case, but it might perhaps still be worth trying, and strongly suspected that it would not be possible to get the girl out. Might be possible to send letters to Kiev through Litvinoff.

Trevelyan will write to [Francis] Birrell to go and see Marchand as soon as he arrives in Paris; Roger Fry will also give his advice when he arrives. If it is better to send a letter as soon as possible, advises him to write to Litvinoff and send that letter to Trevelyan, who will ask Ruth Fry to send it as she is in communication with Litvinoff; this may make him pay more attention to the matter. Necessary to decide before writing whether they want to try and get Marchand's niece out of the Ukraine, or simply to send letters. Wishes he could give more definitive advice, but will do his best to help if he sends a letter. Marchand knows how much Trevelyan is sorry for the pain Madame Marchand [Sonia Lewitska] is experiencing at the moment, and how much he would like to help if he could.

Draft or copy letter from Elizabeth Trevelyan to Virginia Woolf

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Bob thought Virginia might like to have 'some additional memories of Helen Fry' [to help with the writing of the biography of Roger Fry], since she perhaps saw her 'from a slightly different angle'. Saw a 'great deal' of Helen when the Frys' children were born and they lived in Dorking, while the Trevelyans were 'two miles away at Westcott'. She was friendly, but they 'never became intimate then', and Bessie 'always felt slightly in awe of her mysterious aloofness'. Their relationship 'suddenly seemed to change when the return of her illness approached', when Helen 'began to talk more intimately about the children', one day visiting Bessie 'to talk about her fear that the doctor and other people would think she was not a good enough mother to the children or wife to Roger'; believes 'this anxiety was a constant trouble'. Saw her 'more rarely' when they moved to London and Guildford. The Frys stayed at the Shiffolds when 'Roger had been disappointed about the post in America [atthe Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York]'; was clear Helen 'took this morbidly to heart', and seemed to Bessie to think 'she herself had been at fault'. Even when their relationship was 'more easy and confidential', Bessie 'still felt her charm as aloof and mysterious'. Goldie Dickinson used to talk about Helen to Bessie 'years afterward', and though he was 'perhaps, their closest friend' and Helen had been 'very fond of him', he always felt Helen 'so mysterious' and wondered 'what she really thought and felt'.

Incomplete draft letter from R.C. Trevelyan to Virginia Woolf

His friendship with Roger Fry [presumably written to aid Virginia with her 'Life' of Fry; see also 17/85 and 17/97] in the days when they lived together at 29 Beaufort St between April or May 1895 and the autumn of 1896, when Roger married and Bob moved to Haslemere. Saw little of him before then, and 'knew next to nothing of art and artists', but 'no one could have been kinder in the way he introduced [Bob] to his world', or 'more patient of [Bob's] ignorance'. He was often busy with Extension Lectures on Italian art, and as illustration had 'already collected a great number of photographs' which was much harder then; thinks he had already succeeded D. S. MacColl as the "Athenaeum" magazine's art critic ; he did not therefore have as much time as he wished for painting, but 'worked very rapidly' when he could. He was painting 'several of his best early landscapes' and a few 'perhaps not very successful portraits'. One was of Mrs Widdrington, the 'sister [sic: actually mother] of Sir Edward Grey's wife [Frances]', who was a 'great friend' of Roger's and the mother of Ida Widdrington; Roger had been 'very much in love' with Ida not long before, but 'perhaps wisely, she would not marry him. She was a very vital and amusing girl, who loved hunting, farming and acting' and she and her mother remained friends with Roger for years. After that Roger 'had fallen very much in love, and none too happily, with Kate Kinsella (now Kate Presbitero)'; Bob thinks she 'treated him rather cruelly, not wanting to give him up altogether, and luring him back to her from time to time'. 'Fortunately (or perhaps in the end unfortunately) [because of her mental health' he got to know Helen Coombe while he was living with Bob, and they fell in love with each other. Roger's parents 'strongly disapproved of his becoming an artist' - he told Bob that they had offered him a hundred pounds extra a year 'if he would promise never to paint from the nude', which he 'naturally refused' - and this made him fear they would not be pleased by his choice of wife, so he told them nothing about Helen 'for a long time...' [the rest of the draft is missing].

Letter from Arnold Dolmetsch to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Boveney, nr Windsor. - Should have answered her 'kind letter' before, but has been very busy. Had the 'public examination' yesterday in the Bankruptcy Court, which went as well as possible; the trustee advised him to apply for his discharge at once saying he would not oppose it. He therefore hopes to be 'out of all this trouble' soon. Thinks her idea of having lessons on the clavichord 'excellent'; sure she would do well and 'become very fond of the instrument'; it would also be 'very convenient' for the Dolmetschs as the Frys also want to continue their lessons. His wife likes the idea and will write tomorrow suggesting a day. Has not yet made the clavichord key, but will do soon.

Letter from Arthur Waley to R. C. Trevelyan

Department of Prints and Drawings, British Museum, London: W.C. - Trevelyan can certainly let them publish the Su Tung Po poem in the UDC [Union of Democratic Control?]; asks only that his name not be used; does not think he has anything else similar; is sorry 'Wieger spoils the story of Wu-ti. He would'. Thinks the plan with Roger Fry [to publish a book] will come off; Fry does not want illustrations, and Waley hopes he will allow the cover to be plain; does not 'mind as long as it doesn't savour too definitely of Bloomsbury, 1917'; Fry was 'awfully nice'.

Letter from Arthur Waley to R. C. Trevelyan

13 Hanover Terrace. - Glad that Trevelyan and [Gordon] Bottomley have 'managed to get some fun out of the No play'; it is not a good one, and he translated it only as an appendix to his book on Po Chu-I; this may get written now, as he has just been rejected again byy the army and hopes he will have a 'quiet six months'; will also translate some more No plays. Went to hear [Thomas] Sturge Moore read his Viking play [Tyrfing] yesterday; thought it 'very well done' and intellectually judged it 'a fine thing', but 'somehow' was not interested by it; this may have been because Sturge Moore's reading was 'downright bad', as he thinks it 'would act rather well'. Read the 'magnificent exordium' to the seventh book of Pliny's "Natural History" recently and quotes in Latin at length from the passage about man. Does not want Hakurakuten at present. Looks forward to seeing Trevelyan, perhaps in June. Hears Mr Ch'eng [see 17/3, 17/5?] 'made a great oration' recently at the Japan Society 'rather mocking at the self-satisfaction of the Japanese', which people say was a 'great success'. Asks whether Trevelyan has seen [Roger] Fry's exhibition of "Copies and Translations" from the old masters; some of those he saw in his studio were 'great fun'.

Returns to the letter on 11 June: has 'just discovered the later parts of Piers Ploughman [sic: Plowman]"; it is 'brilliant' from canto 16 onwards, but 'the beginning is so boring that no one ever gets as far'. The best canto is 18; expects Trevelyan 'found that out long ago'. Has translated a short, slight No play called "Hatsu-yuki, or Early Snow", about 'a court lady who loses a pet bird'; has not had time to do a longer one as he has been 'so immersed in exploring (in books) the Gobi Desert on behalf of Sir Aurel Stein'. Adds a handwritten postscript to say he would like to come for a weekend visit, if the Trevelyans could have him.

Letter from Arthur Waley to R. C. Trevelyan

British Museum, London, W.C.1. - Has just heard that Oswald Sickert has lost his job with the Encyclopaedia Britannica and will be in England in about a fortnight looking for work. Corrects an impression given by his last letter: only met Adrian [Stephen: see 17/25] once and liked him, does not know him well. Asks if Bob could translate Aeschylus's "Prometheus" for the Art Theatre" as requested by [Vera ] Donnet; thinks his way of doing the chorus would 'work very well' for recitation. Was greatly bored by the first performance by the Art Theatre [George Farquhar's "The Beaux' Stratagem"]: everybody 'connected with it is completely Philistine', and he does not think that any good will come of it, though it will be no worse than 'the Stage Society, Pioneers, Plough, Bel Espoir, Paddington Players, Malleson's Mimes or anything of the rest'.

Has arranged to publish his next book ["More Translations from the Chinese"] with Allen and Unwin; Constable's [who published his first book] is 'a nuisance to get to'. [Eugene] Morice has died of illness at Salonika and his bookshop [in Museum Street] is for sale; would be 'great fun' to run it, but he is afraid there is not 'enough sustenance in it for Oswald'. Has translated about thirty more poems of Po Chu-I for the new book, but may 'weed them out a bit', as well as a new version of Ou-yang Hsiu's "Autumn Dirge'. [Gordon] Luce's poems have been 'an appalling blow'; liked some of them at first, but now 'hate[s] them all'. Asks if anyone has seen [Charles] Vildrac and whether he is translating any more of Po Chu-I into French. Does not think he has seen Roger Fry since Bob went away. The Dickinsons [Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson and his two sisters] are soon to move into the upper storey at 13 Hanover Terrace.

Letter from Bessie Sickert to R. C. Trevelyan

17, Berners Street, W.1. - Thanks Trevelyan for his letter enclosing one from Roger Fry. Is happy for Oswald's papers to be published; Arthur Waley suggests that the Hogarth Press might take them, especially if Walter [Sickert] were to write a foreword. The papers need revising, and she would be very grateful if Trevelyan could do this; he must say if he is too busy. If he is in town soon they could lunch and discuss the idea.

Letter from C. P. Sanger to R. C. Trevelyan

3, Hare Court, Inner Temple. - Thinks Bob cannot be 'in love a bit' - he is 'so disgustingly reasonable'; why is he thinking about 'acting wisely' when he should be feeling that he does not 'care a damn whether [he is] or not'. George has only seen [Elizabeth] once, and still gave him a 'much more favourable description' than Bob had managed with his '"tolerably accomplished for a young lady" and all that sort of thing'. Cannot ever remember being really pleased before that one of his friends was going to be married; hopes it will make Bob 'work properly which will be a splendid thing'. Asks him to send 'accurate details as to intellect & views of life of Miss van [der] Hoeven'. Expects it's 'still a secret'; announced it at the [Apostles] Society, and also told Goldie [Lowes Dickinson] on Sunday, who 'said "Good God!"' but Sanger supposes he will have 'sufficiently recovered from his astonishment' by now to write. All 'fog & rain & general damnation' here, with the 'climax of [Sanger's] miseries' being the party his mother is going to give, to which she will invite his friends and they will accept; asks if Bob agrees with his own loathing of parties, and hopes that 'there won't be many in hell'. Has not yet seen McT[aggart]'s wife, but reports of her are so 'rediculously [sic] favourable' that he is bound to be disappointed when he does. Has reclaimed something [illegible] for Bob, having 'meekly paid the money' as he 'felt too lazy to make a fuss'. Sends love to Roger and regards to Mrs Fry.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Very sorry to hear of Madame Hubrecht's illness; understands that Bessie will not be able to leave her for some time; hopes she will recover soon though it is a bad time of year for bronchitis. Will be glad to have Bessie whenever she can come, except for the few days around their move to London, which they intended would be around 19 February. Was anxious for Bessie to come to Welcombe as she and Robert would enjoy walks and drives in the countryside and seeing Stratford; hopes she may still be able to spend a week there, then visit the Frys and return to them for a few days in London. Glad Bessie has told Robert to stop in Italy; he writes 'very contentedly from Ravello' and she hopes he has got on with his play.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Very pleased that Elizabeth and Robert will come to Glasgow [for the International Exhibition]; hopes it will be cooler by the 29th; has written to book rooms at the Windsor Hotel. Suggests returning to Wallington on Wednesday; [Roger] Fry will come on the 1st or 2nd August. Asks if Elizabeth would like her Dutch papers to be forwarded.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Hopes Elizabeth finds her 'new quarters' comfortable. Has reserved rooms at the Windsor Hotel in Glasgow, and thinks she will come on the early train arriving between 2 and 3 in the afternoon; thought of going to the E[xhibition] that afternoon for a first sight, and wonders when Elizabeth and Robert can be there. Hopes it will not get too hot again until they have left Glasgow. Does not think Elizabeth's [Dutch news]paper is coming now.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad to get Elizabeth's card, as was slightly anxious about the crossing [to the Netherlands] they just escaped what seems to have been a terrible gale in the Channel on Thursday. Asks if she and Robert got her letters at the Langham; if not, Robert should write to the manager as she does not want the postal orders she sent him to be lost. Very glad Elizabeth's uncle is better and that she feels well herself. The book ["Polyphemus and Other Poems"] arrived yesterday; they think it 'very attractive & quaint'; Sir George will write to Robert about it. Thinks it should have some success. The title page and 'Swallow' [illustrations by Roger Fry] are very pretty; likes the poem "The [Lady's] Bat" particularly, though she does not think the picture such a success. Sends their regards to Elizabeth's uncle, cousin Marie, and all her family, and hopes she has a very happy week.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Hotel des Alpes, Mürren. - Arrived yesterday and plan to stay for more than a week; it is a 'wonderful place' though the air is 'rather fatiguing' at first. She will rest today; Sir George is very well and 'walks a great deal'. The electric railway to Interlaken is pleasant and travels through some fine passes. Very sorry to hear from Elizabeth about the Russells; [their separation] is 'surprising and very sad'; sure Russell is 'difficult, & the family are rather uncompromising' but he is 'a quiet good fellow'; does not know her [Alys] well but thought she seemed 'to belong to another "monde"'. Likes to think of Julian almost walking; asked what is settled about the nurses, and whether Mrs Catt is going to the hospital; it is very sad. People must be very anxious about the weather [for the Coronation]; is glad to be 'out of it all'; Mürrer is completely quiet, with no road for carriages, and Bob would love it. Glad Julian likes his cart. George says [he and Janet] are going on 12 July to the Lakes, and would like to come to Wallington in September; asks if Elizabeth and Robert could be there for some of that time. Is glad the [Trevelyan Man] Hunt was a success once more, it is 'a wonderful institution'. Thinks C[harles] and M[ary] will enjoy themselves at the [Coronation] festivities. Sends love to Robert, and asks if Mr [Roger] Fry is coming.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad that Elizabeth enjoyed the visit of her friend [Miss de Natrys]. Sorry to hear she has nettle rash, which is a 'horrid thing'; she herself had it for several weeks on her return from therr travels this year. Glad Robert is better and hopes he will soon make progress; asks if he is working on the novel. Asks if [Roger Fry's] illustrations [for Robert's "Polyphemus and Other Poems"] are finished, and if the arrangement has been made with the publisher [Johnson]. Theo [Llewelyn] Davies is here today, as are Mr [Charles Francis, Jr] and Mrs Adams; the Adamses are American, and he has corresponded with Sir George for a long time so they are keen to meet each other. Tomorrow they are expecting the G [?] Buxtons and two daughters. Asks Elizabeth to write from Pinewood to say how Aunt Margaret [Holland] is. Hopes Robert and Elizabeth will be able to make their landlord do the repairs.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Hopes Elizabeth is enjoying her time with Madame Grandmont; wonders whether Robert came home last week. They had a beautiful walk on the moors on Saturday. Very glad to get Elizabeth's news of Aunt Margaret [Holland] 'as it is never easy to understand from men about illness'; very sad to think of her condition. Sir George sends his love and thanks for the letter; he has gone to fish this morning. In the afternoon they will attend a meeting of the managers of Cambo school. Elizabeth must tell her what she decides about the violin, and about the house. Is sorry to hear from Mr [Roger] Fry that one of their children [Pamela?] has been ill; supposes they do not see much of the Frys now. Sends regards to Madame Grandmont; wishes they had been in London during her stay. A postscript says that if Elizabeth wants tea in London she is welcome to take it at No. 8 [Grosvenor Crescent]; the housemaid's name is Maria Springett.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Is sorry 'about the wee doggie'; it is very sad but she hopes 'he may recover'. Is sending some game today; the grouse should be eaten first but the pheasants should keep until they return from Stocks [the Wards' country house]. Sir George has recovered, and he and his three friends are 'very happy together'; it is 'too funny sometimes to hear their reminiscences'; Sir George and Lord Belper 'took up an argument just where they left it 41 years ago!'. Mary is here; she and Charles are very happy; she 'certainly improves on acquaintance' and told Caroline that she was 'dreadfully uncomfortable' when staying in August, this is probably what 'made her so abrupt'. Mary is 'enchanted' with the house: they have a 'very tiny one in London' which is not as nice as Cheyne Gardens [George Trevelyan's new house]. Wants to hear what Elizabeth thinks of Cheyne Gardens; they will have fun on Friday and wishes she could be there. Is 'deeply grieved [sic] for Fry's anxiety [about his wife]'. Booa is 'very jealous about the apples & would like to have some'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Wonders if Elizabeth got to Tunbridge yesterday. The H[enry] Y[ates] Thompsons, Hilda and Audrey Trevelyan have been to stay; they had 'a "tea picnic" on Wednesday at the Gibbet'. Miss Martin came last night and is to stay for a long visit as she is 'quite "one of the family"; hopes Elizabeth will see her. As 6 Aug is Bank Holiday, would be best if Elizabeth and Robert keep to their first plan and come the week before; Friday would be best as the trains 'are terribly late on Saturday'. She should bring lots of music, as Heathcote Long is coming early in August and is a good musician. Audrey Trevelyan played 'very nicely' when she was here. Glad Elizabeth liked Dolmetsch, who is 'a genius in his way'. Asks how the Frys are, and whether they are coming north this year. Hopes the furniture is arrived, that things are getting settled, and that Robert can 'work comfortably'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad to hear Elizabeth has been 'well & cheerful & busy' and that George has been to visit; will see him on Tuesday and hear what he thinks of the Mill House. Sorry she missed a music lesson, but glad [Johann] Kruse has not 'gone abroad altogether' and that she will have another soon. Hopes Robert is getting on well with his work and will be ready for another holiday when they go to Pen Moel [home of Caroline's sister Margaret]. Charlie has been here again this week; next week is the pheasant shooting. Has to go to London next week, 'rather a horrid long journey for one day' and must go to Welcombe the week after as she and Sir George have 'quite decided to go abroad'. Wonders how Elizabeth will get on with Miggy [Price], who is 'very excitable sometimes' and talks so much she finds her 'very tiring'. Glad Elizabeth's aunt got through her journey to Holland; hopes the treatment at Utrecht will help; supposes Madame Grandmont [Bramine Hubrecht] will be able to look after her as well as her own husband; Elizabeth's uncle will be lonely. Charlie was pasting the wedding photographs into a book last night; 'sad to think how much illness there has been since in the group'. Asks if Mrs [Helen] Fry is keeping well; hopes 'the lantern arrived for the 2nd lecture [by Roger Fry?].

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Sorry to think of Elizabeth in London for two nights; hopes she will not tire herself. Tells her to write when she is settled at Seatoller. The weather is delightful at Wallington; had to go to Newcastle on Saturday but hopes will escape other expeditions for the moment. Wishes Elizabeth and Robert were here; afraid hot weather will not last. Asks when she should invite R[oger] Fry to come and see them. A postscript suggests travelling at night if the heat continues.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - The 'bits of furniture' Elizabeth and Robert have got will be a 'great improvement'; the hall is so pretty it was a shame to keep the 'ugly bookcase'; thinks the sideboard will be a 'nicer & more permanent present than the wine'. Glad that Elizabeth liked the Joneses [Herbert and Lily?]; 'always delightful when friends keep up to one's ideal'. Had a party of visitors this week but they have now all left: Sir Kenelm and Lady Digby, old friends of hers and Sir George's; Charles [Roden]? and Victoria [Alexandrina?] Buxton; and Jack and Alice Pollock. They 'made plenty of noise in the evening over various games; there was a shoot, when the 'girls went to Rothbury & spent the day on the Crag Side Hills'; another day everyone went to Rothbury Lake and Crag. Charlie went off for two days walking with Charles Buxton, who is 'better & stronger than he was'. as is Victoria, but they still both have 'very delicate health' which is 'most unfortunate as they are so full of life & interests'. Sends love to Robert and hopes 'the publisher [Reginald Brimley Johnson] has been amenable'; it 'will be most interesting to see the drawings [by Roger Fry; for Robert's "Polyphemus and Other Poems"]'. Hopes the Frys are well and the baby [Julian] 'flourishing'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Glad to hear good news of Elizabeth and Robert and especially that there are 'pleasant friends to take walks with'. Would have liked to join them on the trip to Amalfi and have 'seen the lovely pergola again'. Glad the rumour about Mr Fry [that he had died] was not true; wonders how it started. More people drop in for tea than at Wallington, which is good for Sir George in the winter as it stops him getting 'too absorbed in his writing'. Henry James is coming for a few days on Saturday, and Dorothy Ward 'to help amuse him'. Is writing an interesting 'Life of Mazzini' by Bolton King, which is 'very well written'. The local recollection of their parties last summer is 'still vivid'. The weather is fine and mild, though TInson 'remarks that "we shall have a pinch for it, later"'. Wishes she had seen Ravello and Amalfi in the sunshine. Tells Elizabeth to find out about the homeopathic cold medicine; has often heard it to be 'very efficacious'. Asks if Elizabeth would like to join the [Grosvenor Crescent] Club; Caroline must arrange it before 20 February if so. Charles has gone to Paris with introductions to politicians. Sends love to Robert, and is glad his play 'prospers'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Would like very much to see the plans [for Elizabeth and Robert's new house, being built at Leith Hill]; hopes they will bring them up to London. It will be a busy time, but they must 'set apart an hour'. Asks whether they will be there on the evening of [Charles and Mary's] wedding, 6 January; Annie [Philips] will be staying with them, and Elizabeth and Robert could come to dine and show the plans then. Elizabeth can have her dress sent to Grosvenor Crescent and change there; they must leave by one o'clock. Believes 'Valescure is still very nice'; seems wise not to make a very long journey in January; expects they will come back earlier than usual to 'look after the house'. George has a cold, and they had a very quiet Christmas day; '[Charles Augustus?] Fitch and a game of whist in the evening being the high water mark of festivity'. Very distressed about [Roger] Fry [over his wife's illness]. Hopes Elizabeth got the pheasants by Christmas day. Very sorry 'the doggie did not recover'. Is reading James's Life of Story ["William Wetmore Story and His Friends"] which is 'in its way quite delightful' and 'makes one long to be in Rome'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Good to hear that Julian is settled in his own nursery again; sure he remembers it 'as he notices so much'. Very glad that nurse [Mrs Catt] is really better, and hopes all will go well now. She and Sir George are settling down at Welcombe; they are alone till George and Janet come on Wednesday. Sir George says Elizabeth 'must not mind about paying'. Sends love to Bob, and says she 'will read the Medici letters [edited by Janet Ross] with much interest'. She and Sir George did not like the Post impressionists [the exhibition organised by Roger Fry at the Grafton Galleries] which 'leave the impression of a bad, & rather nasty dream, though [she] can see how clever some of it is'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent. - Nice to hear of 'sunshine and flowers' from Elizabeth, as it is still very wintry here. Is glad to spend some time in London, see friends, and feel 'in the centre of things'. Charles, M[ary], G[eorge] and J[anet] often visit, and are all cheerful. George and Janet's wedding is fixed for 19 March; the Wards have taken a house at Oxford for a week for it, it is 'an original business' and she hopes it will satisfy everyone 'except the orthodox!'. Has paid Elizabeth's subscription to the [Grosvenor Crescent] Club, and seen the Secretary, who says its future will be 'settled next month' but she thinks it will carried on. Interested by Elizabeth's account of Madame Grandmont [Bramine Hubrecht]'s 'entertainment', and thinks it will be charming as 'the Italians have an artistic strain through all their vulgarity'. Does not think pipes [?] and jam will be useful [for bazaars], but would be glad if Madame Grandmont could send her five pounds worth of Taormina [embroidery and lace] work. Glad to hear the Frys are happier; has been very sorry for Roger Fry. Hopes Elizabeth and Robert will get the question of the road [to the house they are having built at Leith Hill] settled soon; annoying to have lost the winter for building. Wonders what Bob is writing; hopes their translation work is progressing. Politics very interesting, but she thinks the Government will hold on. Has no sympathy for either side in the [Russo-Japanese] War, and wishes 'they could both be beaten'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Will write to Jan Hubrecht at once and invite him; sorry M. [Ambrosius?] and Mad. H[ubrecht] are staying for such a short time. Has had interesting letters from Robert about the Chantrey Com[mission]n, [Roger] Fry and so on; he will be glad when Elizabeth comes. C[harles] and M[ary] hope to get into their new house on 8 August; G[eorge] and J[anet] are going to see Aunt Annie [Philips] tomorrow. If Elizabeth thinks Mary can play well enough to accompany her, they can 'make her practice'; it is very kind of Elizabeth to say she will play at a party. Caroline has to organise the Tenant's party. Asks if Elizabeth's subscription to the G[rosvenor] Cr[escent] Club is due; Caroline will give her the money when they meet; believes the Club has changed management.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Very sorry to hear the news about Elizabeth's uncle; hopes this new anxiety will not last long; reassures her about the success of modern operations. Sorry the boy [Augustus Enticknap] has measles; it is 'a light illness at this time of year'. Elizabeth must be careful about infections, and 'not let other people be exposed to it without their knowledge': the Frys should not come to the house while 'Mrs E. is going about her work freely'. Asks when Elizabeth will come up; thought the dress 'very pretty'; Pantlin should be ready for another fitting at the end of the month. A postscript tells her to ask Robert whether he 'remembers giving the measles to Arnold's boys'

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad that Elizabeth is coming north earlier; the weather is so fine that they have been wishing she and Robert were with them now, but thinks the arrangement 'very good' and will expect them at the start of August. If Robert will let her know the time, she will invite R[oger] Fry to meet them here. Has deferred the school children's party till 16 August, as Sir George thought it would be nice if she and Robert were here. Asks if a garden party would 'bore' Elizabeth; thinks she should do something this summer for the neighbours. Asks if she should get Miss [Mary] Wakefield to come and perform: her 'lecturing is very bad, but her singing was very popular'. Tells Elizabeth to send a box of clothes direct from London if she likes, and asks if they are going to The Park [home of Annie Philips] in July or after the visit to Wallington. Thinks Elizabeth is right to go to Mrs Scharlieb again; tells her to asks how much she ought to walk.

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