Showing 155 results

Archival description
Trevelyan, Paul (1906-1909), son of Elizabeth and Robert Calverley Trevelyan
Print preview View:

Card from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Board of Education embossed card [possibly from Charles Trevelyan, appointed as parliamentary under-secretary]; dated 'Monday. - Molly has been telling them how much better Paul was yesterday; he is very glad to hear it. Read the last half of [Robert's] "Sisyphus" again, aloud to Jan and it read 'capitally'; they both like it all very much. Is giving it to many of his 'literary friends' and hears nothing but praise; he finds some of the metres are too difficult, which is his only complaint.

Card from Sophie Weisse to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Northlands, Englefield Green, Surrey. - Donald [Tovey] hopes to come to the Trevelyans tomorrow afternoon from London; he is 'enviable' as he gets into all sorts of confusion, is 'handsomely penitent, and immediately forgiven', and will see Paul [Trevelyan] and his parents. Donald has been trying to see [Arthur] Nikisch, who asked him to play his Concerto to him with a view to performing it. After his stay with the Trevelyans, he goes on to the Gerald Balfours then to Brighton to play a Beethoven concerto: asks when she will have him at Northlands. A postscript notes that Donald is going to Broadwood's tomorrow.

Letter from Sophie Weisse to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Brighton. - Writes with the news that Donald [Tovey]'s mother died on Christmas Day and the funeral is on Tuesday. Wants then to take Donald and his father back to Northlands for a few days, then hopes Donald will still come on to the Trevelyans instead of going back to Worplesdon. Sends best Christmas wishes to the Trevelyans. Does hope Donald's brother and 'his very capable little wife' will look after Mr Tovey at the Rectory so that Donald can come to the Trevelyans; perhaps Bessie could 'urge it a little'. Fears he will not come to Scotland with her now.

Letter from Sophie Weisse to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Englefield Green, Surrey. - Is recovering well and thinks she will be out of bed by the end of the week; it is a relief to know there is 'no serious mischief'. Very sorry about Paul [Trevelyan]'s illness, a shame for him 'to be liverish and out of spirits like an Anglo Indian', but children mend quickly. Is glad 'the Poet' [Robert Trevelyan] was not hurt. Donald [Tovey] is going north on Saturday; Mrs James is his hostess.

Letter from Sophie Weisse to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Northlands, Englefield Green, Surrey. - Very kind of Bessie to offer the Shiffolds in her absence, but [Donald Tovey] wishes to stay at Northlands until he takes his 'little tour with Mr Trevelyan'. She wished him to accompany his father on his tour of the Mediterranean;Mr [Richard Douglas?] Denman tried to persuade him but he did not want to go; Mr [Frederick] Kelly is coming to work with him. Very kind of Bessie to think of him. Hopes 'Paulchen' will benefit soon from his trip to the sea.

Letter from Sophie Weisse to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Worplesdon St. Mary, Nr. Guildford. - Sends Bessie her address in Scotland, in case anything should be wrong with her 'boy' [Donald Tovey' though he is now quite well and strong. Finds it hard to write, as she wishes, that she is always thinking about Bessie and little Paul, who is a 'sort of dream child' of hers since she remembers 'pacing the lawn' with Bessie before his birth, 'rejoicing'. Feels that Paul will be 'a priceless and inalienable possession... on whom no shadow can ever fall, about whom no misgiving can ever torture [Bessie]' but knows it is very hard for her now.

Letter from Sophie Weisse to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Northlands, Englefield Green, Surrey. - Is counting on Bessie staying on Thursday night, Wednesday night or both; very much looking forward to it as it seems like years since Bessie first left Paul to stay. Asks if she will 'greatly honour and please D. F. T.' [Donald Tovey] by trying the new violin version of his Op. 16 for Clarinet. There will be a rehearsal of the Bach Concerto at 12.30 on Thursday; hopes Bessie can be there for that. A postscript adds 'Of course both [Trevelyans]'.

Letter from Ambrosius Hubrecht to R. C. Trevelyan and Elizabeth Trevelyan

Zoölogisch Museum en Laboratorium, Utrecht. - Sends congratulations on Paul's birth; as far as he can see this name was 'not familiar' in the Trevelyan family, but it has 'a very marked "home" sound" to them. Hopes mother and son keep doing well; will be glad if Robert can let them know when Elizabeth is up again. Their P[aul] and A[nna] are staying at the moment with them at the Janskerkhof; next month Anna 'hopes to follow B[essie]'s good example' [their son Tom was born on 23 January], so it will be a 'merry Xmas to you all'.

Letter from Aubrey Waterfield to R. C. Trevelyan

Fortezza, Aulla, Lunigiana, Italy. - Sends a 'thousand congratulations on the happy event'; they [he and Lina] were glad to get Bob's letter with news of Paul and Bessie. Glad the Enticknaps approve. Is following Bob's plan and goes for walks with 'pockets full of books' everyday, but rarely reads them, instead sits 'basking in the sunshine & the stillness'; describes the surroundings. Lina is 'doing away with the pigions [sic] because they don't pay'; he objects, but will have their tower room for 'a study from which to wander in the roof garden' as compensation. Needs Bessie 'badly to paint the ringhiera [banisters or railing]'; sends love. They miss the Trevelyans both very much this Christmas.

Letter from C. P. Sanger to R. C. Trevelyan

58 Oakley Street, Chelsea, S.W. - Booksellers are 'disposed to deny all knowledge' of Bob's book ["Sisyphus"] and say it is 'not on Longman's list: Bob should 'stir up' his publishers. Has managed to get hold of it and thinks it 'much the best thing' Bob has done, though the 'queer metres & methods of scansion', which he supposes are influenced by [Robert] Bridges, are sometimes puzzling. Doubts however whether 'bigamy had been made a felony in the time of Sisyphus'. Hopes that Bessie and Paul are well.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Delighted to have the news of the birth of Elizabeth and Robert's son; wants to know how much he weighs and so on; hopes the labour was not too hard. Wonders if Robert 'has ventured to hold the baby'; he must start when it is small. The hounds [the local hunt] have been here this morning and she and Sir George went out to them; looked 'very pretty'. Asks whether they have decided the baby's name is to be Paul; Sir George likes it. Amusing to think of the 'three boy cousins' [with Theodore and George Lowthian Trevelyan] so close in age.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Sure Elizabeth is glad to be in bed in this cold weather, though since there was sunshine yesterday and today she and Sir George have taken some walks. The nurse has kindly written a long letter with much she wanted to know about Elizabeth and Paul. Is very glad to hear the nursing [breastfeeding] has begun so well; Mary and Pauline were both 'troublesome' though the boys [Theodore and George Lowthian] were not. Longs to see Elizabeth and Paul but must wait, as both she and Sir George are going to be careful not to catch chills. Has been busy with the accounts, and has 'embarked on another large Vol. of Sorel'. Asks if Elizabeth has had visitors yet; sure Miss Noel will be delighted. Janet is coming on 7 January, and her mother the next day; 'rather alarmed' at the thought of having Mrs Ward for 'two whole days'. Asks if Paul has been out yet; likes the idea of him 'being carried up and down the Tannhurst [sic: Tanhurst?] Terrace which is so sheltered & sunny'. Long holiday at Stratford, with Christmas, bank holiday and local holiday; there has been tobogganing on the hill behind the house, and the pond will soon be frozen enough for skating.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Glad to hear Julian has gained so much weight, and that Elizabeth has recovered her strength so quickly. Interesting that Elizabeth's sister and [Julius Engelbert] Röntgen are coming. She and Sir George are leaving this morning 'in truly patriarchal fashion' since the 'Chelsea nursery' [George and Janet's children: Mary, Theodore and Humphry] join them at the station. Is thinking of Paul today: believes they will 'see him in Julian', who will therefore be 'doubly precious'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Hopes Elizabeth has a good Christmas day with her baby; she should 'feel it a duty to be quite idle'. Sir George is recovering; will take him for a walk this morning; was 'a feverish cold... like something caught in a London fog'. They have had many congratulations on the birth of Paul. Sure Gussie [Enticknap] 'would be astonished to see another baby quite suddenly appear'. She and Sir George are having lunch early, so the servants will be able 'to sit over their dinners' and 'have dessert & crackers &c' and have fun. Thanks Robert for writing twice, though his letters arrived together; the post is 'most erratic' and the postman needs a cart and horse as there are so many parcels. Has started the year's accounts. Sir George was amused by the muisjes [see 10/69]. Asks whether Jan [Hubrecht?] has been to see Paul yet.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Glad that Elizabeth has got to Broadstairs and is in a hotel, which is much more restful; the weather is also improving, after being very bad. G[eorge] and J[anet] came from Leamington in a snow storm on the 15th; they are enjoying themselves and resting here, though Janet has been to London for the day; she seems to have many 'irons in the fire' and never gets tired. Sir George got a bad cold at the end of last week, perhaps because they are 'of course economising fuel'; the doctor came and he is nearly recovered. Wonders whether Elizabeth 'would think him much older'; she does sometimes and then he is 'quite himself again'. Supposes Julian will got back to school early in May; Hopes Elizabeth will come and visit before they go north; they will stay here through May. Asks if Bob shows 'any sign of coming home'. Keeps thinking of 'that sad time at Broadstairs' [the death of Paul Trevelyan?] and is very glad Elizabeth has Julian with her; sends him 5 shillings to spend, as 'seaside shops are always rather fascinating to children'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Hopes that Robert and Elizabeth are 'getting on with their preparations for going abroad', as it will do them good to be away from home for a while [after the death of their son Paul]. She and Sir George are 'better for the quiet' at Welcombe; they talk often about Paul, and Sir George says he often dreams of him, and of Robert as a small child. Thinks this has brought them 'all nearer together': perhaps the worst thing is knowing how unhappy Robert and Elizabeth are. Thinks she has never expressed to Robert all she feels for him, bur is sure he knows she understands his trouble, and how thankful she would be if she could comfort him. Took a long drive yesterday, and discovered Preston on Stour, a 'curious old village'. Buxton's book about Turkey ["Turkey in Revolution"?] is 'certainly amusing'; she also has the new Carlyle letters to read, though Sir George is 'rather averse to them', thinking 'the controversy should be allowed to die out'. He is reading Fererro to her, and translating parts of Suetonius 'which are most amusing'. Hopes Robert found some good books to take abroad at the London Library. Sends love to Elizabeth, and asks him to let her know how she is.

Letter from Charles Philips Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Cambo, Northumberland. - He and Molly are 'very unhappy indeed' for Robert and Bessie [after the death of their new-born daughter Susan]: 'after all the weariness and trouble of the last few months it is very hard to bear for Bessie'. They are very glad she is 'quite strong herself'. Wishes they could do more than feel sorry; Molly cannot visit now, but as soon as they return to London in October she will come.

Thinks they can 'be easy about Paul now': he is 'most extraordinarily different to the poor little picture he was' when he came to Wallington, 'getting quite a good colour and visibly filling out every week'. Bessie may of course want to have him back 'very badly now', and Charles does not suppose it would really 'put him back' to travel, but he thinks the longer he can be left the better it will be for him.

Letter from Charles Philips Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Cambo (on headed notepaper for the Board of Education, Whitehall, London, S.W.) - Enjoyed reading Bob's "Sisyphus" during Christmas week, and congratulates him; found some of the metres difficult. Expects Bob will be feeling little 'enthusiasm for becoming a Taormina landlord just now [he had been left property in the will of Florence Cacciola Trevelyan'. Hopes [Salvatore] Cacciola has not 'perished in the general wreck' [the huge Messina earthquake of 28 December 1908]; asks if Bob has heard how much damage Taormina has suffered, and whether it is true that Sydney Kitson has built himself a villa there; only sees a reference to a relation of Kitson [Robert?] being there. The family have just got home and all are 'very flourishing'; sends love to Bessie and Paul.

Letter from Desmond MacCarthy to R. C. Trevelyan

Thanks for Trevelyan's letter of advice about the article. Has his 'back up' against the Ind[ependent] Rev[iew] at the moment: received a cheque from Jenks for his review which was 25 shillings short of the sum agreed. Does not mind writing 'for love', but does object to having his 'wages chipped at the discretion of that little shit'. Asks for total discretion: must speak to George [Trevelyan] first if he decides to complain. There has been a fight outside the office: Udale had his nose 'scraped'. J. Burns [John Burns?] is probably going to be sued by Harris for libel; this too can only be mentioned to Trevelyan's wife. Would like to visit soon; will bring 'the black wallowing unprofitable & the Marie Kov [?]'. A postscript, reading 'Sir, my name is Otto. Why not make my initials D.S.O?' may be a reference to the Trevelyan's son Paul.

Letter from Desmond MacCarthy to R. C. Trevelyan

8, Cheyne Gardens, S.W. - Addresses Trevelyan as 'Bobolinka': an annotation in pencil reads 'its song is emitted with a volubility bordering on the burlesque [Audubon on the Rice Bird, Boblink or Bobolink]'. Invites him down to stay at Timworth; hears he did not think the conversation at the reading party up to the mark, he would not find this fault at the Green Farm. There is a 'rough tangled plantation' there which MacCarthy wishes to turn into a 'grove for contemplation'; he could help with this. Hopes his wife is well; asks if he can please his son and make him laugh; supposes Bessie would not be able to visit (they cannot yet put Paul up). Asks if he has read Forster's 'Romance' ["The Longest Journey"], which captures 'those miserable muffs the Cambridge Apostles pretty well. What a set!'. A doodle of a face on the last page, crossed through.

Letter from Donald Tovey to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Northlands, Englefield Green, Surrey. - Ariadne ["The Bride of Dionysus"] is 'a joy' to Tovey; has tried it on 'several unprejudiced people' who all confirm his impression that it is a beautiful poem. 'The poet' [Bob Trevelyan] over-rates Tovey's role in it: this is only 'practical & prosaic and mechanical', and Tovey has as much right to praise it as [Joseph] Joachim has to praise the D minor concerto of Brahms. No 'greater proof of originality than the ability to act on external interferences'. Thinks it a totally unique opera. Trevelyan must not 'despoil his other works in this'; cites the bracketed passages in the last act which come from "Polyphemus". Sends 'veneration' to Paul.

Results 1 to 30 of 155