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Carbon copy of a letter from Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence to E. M. Forster

Discusses arrangements for Forster’s forthcoming talk at Peaslake (see 1/284).

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Transcript

16th. February 1944.

Dear Mr. Forster,

I was so glad to get your most kind letter and delighted that you will come and give us a talk at Peaslake if we can arrange a convenient time for you. August is a holiday month for us. We do not usually arrange any gathering for that month and therefore we should be delighted to fix up an extra meeting to meet you and to consider any subject that you feel inclined to talk to us about. We shall esteem it as a great pleasure and privilege and I will await a note from you fixing the date.

Bank Holiday is on August 4th so I would suggest Friday August 11th or some subsequent date.

With very warmest greetings and many thanks,

Yours sincerely,
[blank]

E. M. Forster, Esq.,
West Hackhurst,
Abinger Hammer,
Dorking, Surrey.

Carbon copy of a letter from Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence to Eamon De Valera

Congratulates him on the conclusion of the treaty between Great Britain and Eire. Refers to their previous meetings at Washington and elsewhere and to her efforts to expose the abuses of the Black and Tans. She has touched on some of these matters in her book My Part in a Changing World, which has just been published.

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Transcript

26th. April. 1938.

Dear Mr. De Valera,

May I offer you my warmest congratulations and express my great delight at the conclusion of the Treaty between Great Britain and Eire. I am very thankful that harmonious relations have been established at last between the two countries.

You will not remember me of course, but I spoke on the same platform with you in the City of Washington at a protest meeting against the treatment of Mr. MacSweeny {1}, the Mayor of Cork, in prison and I have also met you on other occasions. I followed with very great grief the horrible episode of the Black and Tans in Eire and I was the first person to get the abuses exposed in the “Daily News” becuase† I went quietly to Eire and obtained sworn statement which I was prepared to stand over in a Court of Law. I am only telling you these incidents because I would like you to know how I have followed events in your country with deep sympathy which enables me now to rejoice all the more in this happy conclusion.

I have touched on some of these matters in a book I have just published entitled “My Part in a Changing World.[”] I do rejoice with you and my other friends, the patriots of Eire, who cherished the dream of her freedom when it seemed impossible and have seen that dream come true in their life time.

Yours sincerely,
[blank]

Rt. Hon. Eamon De Valera,
Government Buildings,
Dublin,
Ireland.

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{1} i.e. Terence MacSwiney.

† Sic.

Carbon copy of a letter from Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence to Miles Malleson

Agrees in deploring the suppression of artistic works. The seizure of Malleson’s plays is evidence of their power to kindle the imagination.

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Transcript

31st. October, 1916.

Dear Mr. Malleson,

Yes alas—when I sent round next morning after writing my letter to you to purchase copies of your Plays to send away to my friends, my messenger was told that it was too late[,] that the Authorities had descended upon the publisher and seized every copy. I agree with you that there is something very menacing indeed in the fact that even {1} the work of an artist is subject to suppression. I think it is one of the most serious dangers with which any Community could be confronted. I see that a question is to be asked in Parliament to-day. I am of course extremely sorry that I did not read the Play at once and secure additional copies. I congratulate you again on having written them. The very fact that they have been suppressed is in itself an evidence of the power that is in them to kindle the imagination.

You won’t forget your promise to write to me in a day or two to fix an afternoon when you could look in and see me, or ring me up over the telephone.

Yours with all good wishes,
[blank]

Miles Malleson Esq.,
“The Attic”,
43, Bernard Street,
Russell Sqre. W.C.

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{1} Mistyped ‘thateven’.

Carbon copy of a letter from Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence to Shareefah Hamid Ali

Has been receiving treatment for deafness in Switzerland and supporting her husband’s election campaign. Thanks her for the photographs (see 2/35). She will not be able to attend the conference in India, but is very interested in the progress of the women’s movement there.

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Transcript

24th. November. 1935.

My dear Mrs. Hamid Ali,

I am afraid you will think that I am most remiss in not having replied to your letter before. I was away in Switzerland when it came receiving treatment from a specialist for deafness, and while I was there the General Election was announced and I had to hurry home to take my part in it and support my husband’s candidature in East Edinburgh. I am so glad to say that he was elected Member of Parliament for that constituency.

I am perfectly charmed with the photographs that you send me. I think the photograph of you and your husband is delightful and most beautiful, especially of you. I was also greatly interested to see the pictures of your home. Thank you so much for sending them to me. They will serve as a very delightful remembrance of the very great pleasure it was to my husband and to me to meet you and to hear something of your wonderful work.

It is very kind of you to invite me to the Indian Conference, but I am sorry to say that my health prevents me from accepting such an attractive invitation. The treatment in Switzerland for my deafness has not up till now been a success and I am extremely deaf, and until this condition passes away I am not fit to take part in any public life at all. I believe it is only a temporary condition, but I have no idea how long it is going to last.

I shall be with you in thought at your Congress, and I shall follow your deliberations with intense interest. As you know, my whole life has been given to the woman’s movement, and there is no development of the woman’s that I follow with such interest as that in India. The movement there fulfills† all that I had hoped and dreamed of in my young days. It is so valiant and courageous, so definite and determined and at the same time so entirely free from bitterness or narrowness of conception. People in the very highest position have testified to their belief that it is the most important and most uplifting movement in India, and I am happy to think that such general acknowledgement and admiration has been accorded publicly. I trust and pray that the woman’s movement will keep itself free of all political contamination and will maintain its character and will ultimately set an ideal which will be followed by the rest of the country. India has such a very great future.

With warmest good wishes,

Yours very sincerely,
[blank]

Mrs. Hamid Ali,
The Residency,
Satara,
India.

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† Sic.

Carbon copy of a letter from Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence to Victor Gollancz

Offers to send him the typescript of her autobiography, to be entitled The Old Order Changeth (published as My Part in a Changing World), the substance of which deals with the suffrage movement and the peace movement.

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Transcript

16th. November, 1937.
Victor Gollancz Limited, | Publishers,
14, Henrietta Street, | Strand, W.C.2.

Dear Mr. Gollancz,

I have been engaged during the last year in writing the story of my life and I should like to submit it to you if you would be interested to see it.

The title I have chosen is “The Old Order Changeth” with a sub-title “An Autobiography” over my name.

The substance of the book which deals with the suffrage movement and with the peace movement, both of which had international aspects, will be of interest in the Dominions and also in America which I have visited five times.

There are twenty-two chapters and I am just finishing the twenty-second. The whole consists of about 150,000 words.

Would you care for me to send the typescript in a few days when it is quite finished, to be submitted to your reader? If so, and his report is favourable, we could perhaps then meet to decide details,

Yours sincerely,
[Added in pencil] Signed E P L

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