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Rossetti, Dante Gabriel (1828–1882) painter and poet
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Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Undertakes to mention Myers' wishes in relation to the Moral Sciences Examination. Does not know 'who the other two [examiners] will be.' States that Mayor has been applied to. Is torn between 'a desire to get a good man and to do honour to the Tripos by getting a M. Sc. firstclass-man.' Says he 'quite accept[s Myer's] epithets for [D. G.] Rossetti's sonnets' which pleased him 'critically and classificatorily' since he discovered in Rossetti 'the "missing link" between Swinburne and Christina Rossetti'. Wishes Rossetti would write more.

Discusses Mozley's article on Modern poets in the Quarterly [Review], and claims that he is the first man 'who has spoken adequately of Clough.' Reports that there is a new edition of Clough in the press. States that he has not seen [Roden] Noel since he reviewed him. Remarks that 'that review has turned out unfortunate', and that '[R. H.?] Hutton likes the poems and therefore would have reviewed them...with his goldest pen.' Claims that he could not have said anything stronger in [Noel's] favour, and does not agree with Myers about the book. Declares that Markby 'is a little over enthusiastic about female prospects' and believes himself that 'the question is in a hopeful state.' Claims that 'there is no real conservatism anywhere among educated men.' Adds his opinion in relation to the use of 'esquire'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Writes to ask her to inform William of certain developments; that 'W.A. Wright [new member of the Ad Eundem] cannot come'; that he himself will come if his hayfever is not too bad; and that he has not yet heard from the other new member. States that he is glad to hear that he [William?] is going on so well. Expresses his regret at the news of 'the calamity', involving Dr Meyer. States that he has never met the latter, but that he has heard a good deal from Mary about a Miss Meyer. Reports that [in Cambridge] they are all 'quiet and prosperous', and that he is 'rather hard at work with a variety of teachings.' Asks whether she has got any subscriptions for him for the ladies' lectures. Reports that he has read the greater part of Disraeli's novel [Lothair?], and does not think it equal to the best of his earlier ones, but states that 'it is very light and amusing reading.' Does not think that he has read anything else lately except Rossetti's poems, some of which he judges to be 'splendid', but he would not recommend the whole book.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Acknowledges receipt of the money she sent to him. Refers to his pleasant existence in Berlin, and states that he intends to go soon to Halle, then to Göttingen, and on to Heidelberg, and hopes to meet up with her in Switzerland about the middle of August. Discusses the war; believes that it might have been prevented 'if more trouble had been taken to prevent real misunderstanding on the French side'. States that, while not regarding him as a statesman, he believes in Ollivier's honesty. Does not believe that Benedetti's last request was intended as a provocation, and contends that the king of Prussia could have rejected it courteously. Claims that the 'guilt of the war rests with France', who 'claim supremacy in Europe: every other civilised nation claims only equal rights.' Hopes that the Prince of Hohenzollern 'will now retract his retraction', but thinks this unlikely. Refers to his mother's question as to 'the "good" of such a poem as [Rossetti's] "Jenny" ', and claims to not understand her meaning. Believes it to be 'a perfectly truthful delineation of common-place fact', and explains that 'the pathetic effect of the poem is intended to spring from it's [sic] fidelity to commonplace...' States that if her objection were on the grounds that the subject is too disagreeable, he would argue that the range of tragedy would be limited a good deal 'if one excluded all disagreeable subjects.' Is sorry to hear about Arthur, and asks if ' "this tyranny" throw[s] more work on the assistant masters'. With regard to his personal letters, states that there is perhaps one in a hundred of them that he would not like to be read by anyone else, because of the nature of the subject matter. Hopes that she does not mind sending them on to him.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Asks for information concerning Myers' coming to Cambridge, 'The Prospects of Poetry' and 'The Probabilities of Medicine etc etc'. Declares that they have much to discuss, Sidgwick having failed to write due to the unrealised expectation of seeing Myers at Rugby. Reports that he has to teach history that term, 'no successor having turned up to Pearson: and Cambridge breeding no historian'; they are 'thinking of taking some healthy young resident and locking him up with a Hume'; it is 'rather a disgrace to us that we all take so small an interest in the human race'.

Asks if he has seen Noel 'in the Dark Blue [a literary journal]'. Suggests that he may have been ashamed to send it to Myers, as 'some of the polemic is almost personal'. Declares that it is very well written, 'except the polemical part', and states that he writes better prose than verse. Reports that Noel nearly quarrelled with him 'for reluctantly avowing that [he] did not consider him an equal of Swinburne.' States that Noel 'thinks that the Verbal School (S[winburne?] Rossetti, etc - non sine te) have been found out'. Refers to the Edinburgh of July, and the Contemporary [Review] of October as having evidence to support this theory. States that Noel also thinks that 'Buchanan and R.N are going to be chaired instead by a mutable but at length appreciative public.' Refers to 'a certain Mutual Admiration league' between Noel and Symonds. Believes that Symonds's poetry could be successful, 'if he could only impassion himself about a good subject.'

Asks Myers to send his last epic. Tells him to read Noel's article. Sends his regards to Myers' mother. Announces that his second correspondence circular is soon to appear. Reports that Miss Clough is in Cambridge, that the house is 'getting on', and that there will be five [women] there that term.

Letter from Crompton Llewelyn Davies to R. C. Trevelyan

14, Barton Street, Westminster. - Thanks Bob for his letter; replies by quoting four lines of poetry [the last lines of Browning's "By the Fire-Side"]; his 'heart is still very full' with thoughts of Bob. Bob knows the 'wretched mood' in which Crompton 'could have said vile things about the Dutch', and will 'understand and forgive'. Crompton is 'ashamed to think' how much he has 'trespassed' on Bob's goodness and put his 'sympathy to the strain', but this is because 'the heart opens & the "true self" often reveals itself in all its beastliness & baseness' to Bob more than to most people, as he is 'kind & patient & αἰσθητός [perceptive]'. Therefore knows that 'she in whom your hope has found its gracious soul... [refers to Elizabeth by quoting from Rossetti's "Love-Lily"]... is worthy' and 'blest' in knowing Bob. Says that Bob makes 'the world a better place' by letting them share in his happiness.