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Trevelyan, Elizabeth (1875-1957) musician, known as Bessie
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Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Caroline found the keys yesterday afternoon; he was very glad, but had already told her that even 'much greater losses' were nothing compared to her 'ease of mind'; she is 'none the worse', and they are glad there is nothing to spoil the memory of Elizabeth's visit. He will not mention the keys to anyone. They enjoyed a drive yesterday to Snitterfield Terrace, where Caroline was able to take a good walk.

Letter from Janet Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Pen Rose, Berkhamsted. - Calls Bessie a 'jolly wicked old thing' and says her letter made her laugh aloud. She was indeed 'movin' in the very 'ighest circles on Wednesday, velvet 'at and all' [at an event for the Evening Play Centres Fund]; says her attempt to curtsey to H.R.H. [Mary, Princess Royal] was a 'lamentable failure', as was her attempt to keep calling her 'Y.R.H'. The 'children's part of the show was really jolly', and as Bessie says these things have to be done 'to keep one's nose in front''; the 'City paid up like anything' after last year's show, when Janet 'only had a President of the B[oard] of E[ducation: Edward Wood]' but have not been so eager to contribute this time; they claim they fear 'the watchful eye of Mr Snowden [Chancellor of the Exchequer]' though 'all the knowing ones know' there is nothing to fear yet. Has had a 'Marconigram' from George; he is staying with President [Abbott Lawrence] Lovell at Harvard instead of at a club; '[j]olly for him to arrive in the middle of the oil [Teapot Dome] scandals!'; he is giving seven lectures and will earn 'quite a handsome sum', which will be useful with Mary at Somerville. She is 'radiantly happy there' and discovering 'all kinds of things, not [emphasised] all connected with Political Economy; she is working harder this term for her 'Pass Mods'; her first term was a 'mere whirl of delight'; they will then take a fortnight's holidays near Woody Bay in Devon. Humphry has a motor-bike, and sometimes takes 'rapturous rides on it on Sundays', but he does not ride it to school. Glad Julian is 'really happy at Bedale's'; hopes he will stop growing soon. Would love to lunch with Bessie in London at some point.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Anxious to know how Emma [Elizabeth's niece] got home; fears she was caught by the storm on her crossing. Quite a lot of snow here, which is not thawing though there is not much frost. Hopes that Julian is all right and will be soon out of quarantine; has not had much news from him. Annie [Philips] is 'very energetic' and walks into Stratford every day. Thanks Elizabeth for sending a book through her, which Caroline is now reading. Asks if she has heard about Mary and young George's 'adventurous walk on the Yorkshire moors'; they thought they might have to sleep out but found a cottage to stay in the end. Is up again and taking walks in the mornings; dull for Annie, but they cannot even ask anyone to tea 'in this weather'. Will be very glad to see Elizabeth when it is convenient; asks when Robert goes abroad and whether he will get to Greece; he must come to see her before he goes. Sir George is mostly well, but staying indoors. Hopes Elizabeth's 'new couple [of live-in servants: the Faggetters] continue..' [letter missing its end]

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

The trustee in [Sir John] Withers's firm is H[enry] G[eorge] A[usten] Duckworth, a cousin of Virginia Woolf's; is sending him the letter from Drummonds [Bank] and expects he will deal with it. Hopes to see Julian at the concert on Thursday; is going with Betty Muntz, and hopes Bessie will also come. Saw Ursula last night. Donald [Tovey]'s symphony at Edinburgh went quite well, though the attendance was not large. Has been 'so rushed with proofs' and his visit to Edinburgh that he has not had time to look at [a book by Georges?] Duthuit; will either send it back soon or bring it to the concert.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - An interesting letter came from Elizabeth last night about house staff arrangements at the Shiffolds, and about Julian. Is reading Sophocles, Manin [and the Venetian Revolution of 1848, by G. M. Trevelyan], and Harold Frederic's "Illumination" [The Damnation of Theron Ware"] for the third or fourth time; it is a 'book of wonderful power, and unfailing readableness throughout'. As Bacchus, would have chosen Euripides if the contest [in Aristophanes's "Frogs"] had been between him and Sophocles, but the guard in "Antigone" is a 'very Euripidean, or even fourth rate Shakespearean, character'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Julian Trevelyan

Empire Nursing Home, Vincent Square, London, S.W.1. - Is getting on very well now [after his operation] with little discomfort. Bessie reads Trollope to him most afternoons, and he usually has visitors each day: T[homas] S[turge] Moore is coming to tea today. Hopes Bessie will go to Paris next week, then on to Holland: no reason for her not to now Bob is 'so well' and go to the C.A.s [Clifford Allens] for the first couple of weeks after he leaves the nursing home. He works through chess games in the papers, and has just been looking at the tournament between Cambridge and Oxford, in which the marks were equal; Bronowski, whom he supposes is Julian's friend [Jacob] 'lost his game rather disastrously'. Terence Gray wants to do Bob's [translation of Euripides'] "Medea"in May, which he has agreed to but now regrets; Gray is trying to get [Maria] Germanova for Medea, but 'wants her to do it for nothing'; Bob has telegraphed to her saying she should 'on no account... accept the engagement. It is too monstrous'; Gray probably wants him to step in and pay Germanova himself, which he will not, as he will not be able to get to rehearsals and go through the part with her; Gray is also intending to put Medea in a mask, which is 'the height of folly' regarding Germanova. Unlikely Germanova would have been able to take the part with her husband [Aleksandr Kalitinsky] so ill. Wonders if [Hasan Shahid] Suhrawardy has gone to India yet and whether he has finished his book. Hopes Julian is getting on well with his work; frescos must be 'fun to try', though expects Julian is 'likely to make rather a mess at first'. [Étienne Adolphe?] Piot was 'technically quite competent' but artistically bad. Asks to be remembered to [George] Reavey, and to [Jean] Marchand if Julian sees him. Hopes Bessie will come to Paris next week, and see the Luce family. He and Bessie had hoped to see the Sykes family this month, but had to put it off; supposes [Hugh]'s exams are coming up anyway.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

He and Caroline are reading J. A. Symonds's letters aloud, which 'raise him exceedingly'; they like them much better than his books. Quotes at length and approvingly from a letter from Symonds to Henry Sidgwick, describing Euripides as 'a sort of divine Beaumont and Fletcher'. Glad to have a postcard from Elizabeth about her quiet crossing [to the Netherlands].

Copy letter from Virginia Woolf to R.C. Trevelyan

Monk's House, Rodmell, Lewes. - Returns Percy Lubbock ["Earlham", see 17/88] with thanks. Cannot make out why 'in spite of every appearance to the contrary' and Logan [Pearsall Smith?]'s recommendation, she thinks it 'a thoroughly bad book'. Percy is 'obviously intelligent, scrupulous [a long list of his virtues follows]' and his style is 'by no means despicable [another list of virtues follows]'. Suspects there is 'something hopelessly prosaic, timid, tepid, in his goal. The spirit of Earlham is undoubtedly the family butler'; detects a 'conspiracy to misrepresent the human soul in the interests of respectability and... of the defunct Henry James' and wonders why Percy, 'who is comparatively young' has ended it; it makes her 'long for glaring suburbs, brass bands - Brighton Piers'. Acknowledges she exaggerates, but it is strange how good and bad the book is; wonders whether 'Percy himself is corrupt'; has just met him. She and Leonard return to Richmond on Monday, and hopes Bob and Bessie will soon visit; wants to discuss his Aeschylus [translation of the "Oresteia"]; accepts his spelling of 'quire'. Would not 'yield to Logan. If he thinks "Earlham" a masterpiece, he is not to be trusted about the letter K'. Hopes Robert is writing a poem; is 'dipping into "Georgian Poetry [1920-] 1922"' [edited by Eddie Marsh] and getting 'bored to death with apple trees and acorns'. Notes in a postscript that she and 'Bertha Ruck' are now 'great friends' [Berta Ruck was offended by Virginia's near-use of her name on a tombstone in "Jacob's Room"]; 'Tom Gaze [a typing error for Tom Gage, another tombstone name?] turned out to be Lytton [Strachey]-Carrington'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan and Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon [crossed through]. - Her journey went well; on arrival, they were relieved about Sir George, who was 'very seriously ill on Sunday'. He did not send for her, and wrote a long letter which Hearn kept for her [12/166] showing that he did not want Caroline to leave Robert and Elizabeth. Thinks it was necessary as Miss Martin is also ill in bed and Booa [Mary Prestwich] felt the responsibility too much. They have a nurse and he is recovering, but the fever has not gone yet. Originally enclosing Uncle Harry's letter; Sir George is 'distressed' that he will not be well enough to be in town on the 14th [the day of Robert's election to the Athenaeum Club]; he is writing to Uncle Harry and others asking them to help. Caroline thinks it will be all right. Was upset to leave Robert and Elizabeth; hopes Nurse Catt came, and that Nurse Godwin is better.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Glad [Nurse] Godwin is better; sure Mrs Catt is helpful to them all. Sir George and Miss Martin still have temperatures, but not much above 100 [degrees Fahrenheit]; Miss Martin is quiet but Sir George is 'most difficult to manage'. Had to find a new nurse yesterday to look after them at night, do washing, bedmaking and so on. Sir George is very upset at not being able to go to London on 14 January 'to look after Robert's election at the Athenaeum'; they have divided up a list of friends to write to, and Caroline has told C[harles] who will 'doubtless be able to send people to vote' if in town. The doctor is anxious that Sir George should not catch any chill, which might turn to pleurisy, but thinks they will avoid this; thinks she told Elizabeth that it was the doctor and Booa [Mary Prestwich] who sent for her as they were worried on Sunday. Was very sorry to leave.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - The invalids are recovering well: Miss Martin 'sitting up dressed' and Sir George up in Caroline's room for four hours, though he is not to go downstairs till Sunday. He is 'fairly patient, with occasional spurts of wilfulness'. Very sorry that Elizabeth is having to wait [for the baby to be born]; reassurance that it is only a week tomorrow from the expected date. Spending much of her time talking to the invalids. Glad that Nurse G. [Elizabeth's Nurse Godwin] is better. Sir George has decided he will not go to the seaside and will stay at Welcombe till recovered, when they can go to London. Everyone 'thinks Robert will come in on Monday triumphantly' [in his election to the Athenaeum Club]; Uncle Harry is obviously being 'most active'; thinks Robert will like it. Has read "L'Oiseau Bleu" [Maeterlinck's "The Blue Bird"?] and thinks it 'very pretty', though it might easily be spoiled by being put on stage; sure it is better in French than in English. C[harles] and M[ary] are going to London tomorrow. Sends love to Bob and regards to the 'ladies of Leith Hill'. A postscript written on 'Saturday morning' [21 Feb] notes that the invalids have both had good nights; they can meet this afternoon 'to talk over their woes & compare their symptoms'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Fears Elizabeth will have been 'terribly vexed' by the result of the election in their seat [Reigate]; is convincing many people that there must be a Reform Bill and a limit to the [House of] Lords' veto; Sir George has always urged this, with little effect. Is definitely recovering now and sure she will be able to visit on Tuesday; thinks the London route will be best. Very glad Nurse Godwin is coming today; Elizabeth should not have much longer to wait [before the birth of her baby]. Hopes Robert did not catch a cold with his 'nocturnal rambles'. There was skating on the pond behind the house yesterday, but a complete thaw today. Mary has been 'laid up at Rounton', but hopes to get home today.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Afraid there is 'no chance for Mr Brodie' [in the Reigate election]; Robert did 'nobly' [canvassing for him]. Thinks this election will 'open people's eyes to the necessity of a Reform bill, & an amendment to the corrupt practices bill', which have been 'so foolishly put off'. There will be a Liberal majority. Is not recovering as quickly as she would like, but is still 'better every day' and thinks a change of air will do her good and that she will be able to come and visit. Glad that Elizabeth is well, and that Nurse Godwin will soon be with her. Will get her a book from the library.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - She and Sir George quite taken up with the elections; glad Charlie's is over [at Elland] and that though his majority was reduced it is still very good; expects 'a body of Socialists' voted against him though they could not run their own candidate. Wishes Charles would rest now, but thinks he will help other candidates. The poll at Stratford is as good as could be expected. Is recovering gradually; goes for a short walk every day; will be well enough to visit Elizabeth on 1 February. Glad Elizabeth thoroughly like[s] Nurse Catt; asks if Nurse Godwin comes on the 28th. Very interested in the results of the election for Elizabeth and Robert's constituency [Reigate]; fears it will be a 'hard fight'. Hopes Madame Grandmont is better. Asks whether she should come via Reading or through London.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Elizabeth's news [that she is pregnant] 'very important'; hopes that all will go well; she should see the doctor about taking precautions against the trouble she had last time; perhaps she should see Dr Phillips again. She should have a good nurse in the house well in advance, not Nurse Godwin who is 'not first rate'; hopes Nurse Shepherd is. Tells Elizabeth to let her know what Dr Cornish thinks. If the operation has to be this autumn, thinks it would be good for Elizabeth to be at Welcombe; does not like the idea of her 'having the anxiety of it now'. She and Booa [Mary Prestwich] will make plans for her stay. Janet went on Monday; will tell Molly, but she sees her rarely and always in a crowd.

Letter from Janet Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Stocks Cottage, Tring. - Thanks Bessie for her letter; was afraid it 'might be so with Nurse Godwin' and is not surprised 'she doesn't want to take on other people's babies at 4 months old'. Is very grateful for Bessie's 'noble offer' to come and stay with Janet herself for part of the time, and would be 'delighted' to have her for as long as she can manage; can easily put up Bob too if he wants. Asks which part of the fortnight from 26 June - 10 July Bessie can come for; will know 'at any rate during those days my baby's bottles will be properly washed!'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon - Annie [Philips] is staying with them and is well; she takes a 'good walk' with Sir George in the afternoon. Has news of Bob in London; hopes he will not catch Mary's cold; was glad to hear from Mary that she was deferring her daughters' returns as they would catch colds if they came to London in this weather. There is influenza in Stratford, and the town is full: over a thousand soldiers, plus refugees and wounded. They went to see the hospital, which is 'a curious sight'; 'really wonderful how everyone is working'. Sir George is fairly well, and 'enjoys talking to the officers'; they miss the children. Sure the Abercrombies will be sorry to leave the Shiffolds when the time comes; asks if David could stay a while longer, or if he would be 'an anxiety'. Hopes Miss Evans has come back better; asks if Nurse Godwin has gone. Sends love to Robert. Sir George has recently read her "The Old Curiosity Shop"; it is a 'child's book, but the characters are vivid, and dreadfully exaggerated'. They have just started "Middlemarch", which is very good to read aloud. Has little time for reading as she is doing the accounts and 'making all sorts of resolutions of economy'. Booa [Mary Prestwich] sends her love.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Is sorry Elizabeth is so worried about the change of nurse; hopes the 'lady nurse' will suit, and thinks Elizabeth is wise having her to see her; she must try not to mind about 'Nannie' as it is not for long and J[ulian] will not come to harm in a few weeks; asks whether she could get Nurse Godwin back for a while. Julian would learn 'so much without real lessons, from anyone knowing modern methods'. Asks Elizabeth to let her know if she will be stopping in London on 5 November; they could spend all of Thursday together apart from the time of Caroline's appointment with Carter and a dressmaker. Sir George comes then, and they start on Sunday [for Italy]; would come to see Julian then but Sir George wants to start then. Does not like Elizabeth being alone this autumn; encourages her to get someone to stay with her, and not to 'fret' as Julian is 'very satisfactory' and it is good he does not mind losing his nurse. Asks if she should let Booa [Mary Prestwich] know about the nurse. Sends some old photographs of Bob which Annie [Philips] has sent her; asks if he is the 'practical element in the party of the 3 poets [Bob, Lascelles Abercrombie and Wilfrid Gibson]. Is 'trying to understand the Land policy': reading the Report and the speeches.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Relieved to have good news of Elizabeth; asks if she 'fret[s]' much about the 'disappointment [her miscarriage]'; she and Robert 'have been sorely tried'. They were fortunate to be able to get Nurse Godwin; when she has to leave they must get Mrs Fry or someone else efficient; expects Elizabeth will take a long time to recover. She and Sir George have managed to escape colds. C[harles] and M[ary] are going to London tomorrow. Very sad that Julian is 'still alone in his nursery', but at least he is well and strong. Hopes Madame Grammont [Bramine Grandmont Hubrecht] will visit. Is sending a letter for Elizabeth to be given to her when Robert thinks best [10/139].

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Is 'distressed' that Elizabeth is 'laid up'; hopes she is feeling better; she must be careful about travelling but hopes she can get to the sea when the weather is better. Sir George had a chill last night but is better this morning. Finds Mary a good companion, and she can amuse herself; she has started a letter to Elizabeth and has a 'high opinion' of her nurse, who she says 'keeps Julian in very good order'. They have been reading "The Roman Journals of [Ferdinand] Gregorovius' which is 'interesting and amusing', and have just sent it back to the London Library; it would be good to read in bed. Asks if there is any chance of getting Nurse Godwin at once; sure Elizabeth needs someone to look after her and 'however good dear Bob is, he is not a nurse!'.

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