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Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick
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Letter from Charlotte Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Confesses that when she was unwed she 'used to think Arthur's wife would be such a nice person, and do things nobody else could do', but now she realises the truth, it is a comfort to her 'to think another is coming into the family' [i.e., that Henry is soon to be married]. Declares that the marriage 'will make everybody so happy and Mother and Minnie.' Expresses her happiness at the news. Writes that she hopes that Henry's intended bride is a Girton girl, but crosses the line out.

Sidgwick, Charlotte Sophia (1853–1924), wife of Arthur Sidgwick

Letter from Janet Catherine Symonds to Henry Sidgwick

Suggests that he come to visit them about 28 December for four or five days. Explains that Johnnie could not go away before that. Sympathises with him about photographing. Reports that Johnnie is better than he has been for weeks. Expresses her sympathies in relation to the 'revolution' at Rugby [the departure of the headmaster Frederick Temple?]. Sends her love to Sidgwick's mother, and asks him to tell her how sorry she is for her. Reports that they have had Mr Myers with them a good deal during the autumn. She 'cannot help wondering always if he will "last"...in Mr [Conington]'s sense of the word.' Reports that Dr Symonds is ill again, but hopes that it is just a temporary relapse.

Symonds, Janet Catherine North (1837-1913) author

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Thanks her for her letter. Thinks that his illness was due to something he ate. Declares that he enjoyed his visit to [London], and sent an account of the visit to [ ]. Reports that Mr Wheatley [his godfather] was very kind to the. Declares that he would like to see Miss Green [his former governess] if his mother can induce her to stay until he [and his brother William] come home. Refers to his mother's advice about his chess playing and assures her that he has not played more that five games 'since the beginning of the quarter...' Asks her to buy something for [his friend] Harry James out of his money. Explains how they were 'got into the 2nd class in German', and in relation to the play declares that they do not have to translate it themselves. Sends his love to all at home, 'including Elizabeth [Cooper]'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Thanks her for the cheque for £10, and undertakes to do his best with regard to the circulars. Reports that he has gone through just half of his examinations 'perhaps as well as [he] expected altogether; better in the Mathematics so far, but a miserable failure in the "Cram" '. As to the latter states that E.W. Benson will explain. Doubts his chances of being first, and complains that he is 'doomed to golden mediocrity.' Regrets that the photograph 'did not please'. States that Edward will see in the Times of the following day that Holmes has won the Porson Prize, and comments that 'the Johnians have got everything this year which will grieve his patriotic heart.' Sends thanks to Minnie for her letter.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Edward White Benson

Reports on the manner in which he learnt the news of his having won the Craven Scholarship. Recounts the appearance of the University Marshal in his rooms that day to announce the news, and his reaction to it. Hopes that Benson had not given his mother and those at home any hopes that he had any chance of succeeding so that they may have had 'a thorough surprise'. Announces that he intends to come down after 'the Little-go is over and come up again for the Trinity Scholarship examination', if Benson and his mother are agreeable.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Reports that he sent off 'a solace' for her loneliness the previous day. Regrets that there is no chance of his seeing his aunt before he goes abroad. Hopes to be able to go and see her at the end of the Long [vacation]. Undertakes not to come home until he is forced, 'unless [he] can speak German properly'. Announces that he leaves Cambridge for London the following day, where he intends to meet some friends. Reports that his three weeks in Cambridge have not been spent quite as he could wish, but admits that they have been profitable. Hopes that she will like Plato, and tells her to attribute whatever she dislikes in the work to Whewell's mistranslations. Declares that he is glad to hear of her walking, and hopes that she won't overdo it. Thanks her for the ghost story [cf 101/146], and reports that he had had two at first hand by letter from a clergyman. Sends his love to William.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Explains his failure to write sooner on a succession of visitors, and the May examination. Presumed that Arthur would give her news of him. Reports that he has very nearly got through his work, and that he intends to be finished it in the next four hours. In relation to his private work reports that marks are to be added up in conclave the following day, followed by a dinner. Intends to go to London on Wednesday or Thursday, and hopes to get rid of his hayfever there. Hopes to find a lodging somewhere near the British Museum, as he wishes to use the library. Does not think he will venture down to Rugby 'until the end of the perilous season.' Reports that he has just heard from Tawney, who is staying in the Bernards' house on the Lake of Geneva, and who is 'bent on matrimonial designs.' He wants Henry to 'go and back him up'. Henry feels inclined to go as it would probably be the last he shall see of Tawney apart from a flying visit to England.

Refers to his health and reports that he feels very well, but that his hayfever causes him some discomfort. Asks his mother to tell Arthur to read Nina Balatka. Does not think that it can be by Trollope, but states that it is 'a very decided and very successful imitation of his manner'. Supposes that she will see William before he goes, and refers to his competition against W. Jackson. Reports that he saw Edward the previous day 'as a D.D.', and states that Mr Martin looks better.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from London]:- Reports that he has been unexpectedly detained in England, due to Patterson having delayed his arrival in London for two days. Has decided not to go to Heidelberg until the Autumn, and has decided on Berlin as the place of his residence. Announces that Edward Benson has given him introductions to professors there. Reports that he has not heard from Mrs [A ], but he may yet, as his letters from Cambridge have not yet been forwarded on to him. Expresses his wish to visit Heidelberg 'and enjoy the wonderful beauty of the castle', but does not intend to stay there as long as he had at first intended. Hopes that his mother received his parcel 'and found the philosophy soothing and elevating'; and also hopes that she continues with her walking.

Reports that he is now staying with his friend Cowell, 'who is living here now en garçon, as his family are gone to Norway'. Claims to be enjoying himself a good deal. Reports that he went to see Holman Hunt [Hunt's picture, The Finding of Christ in the Temple] again, and maintains that the picture improves every time he goes. Announces that that night he is going 'to witness some spirit rapping'. In relation to poetry, states that he has 'no "[afflatus]" ', and can't write any. Reports that at Cambridge he is considered 'irretrievably donnish.' Reports that there is another book lately published by the ' "[ ] etc" ' Praises the Saturday Review, and predicts that he will miss it in Berlin. Sends his love to William. Asks her to send Arthur's address to him in Berlin.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from Berlin]:- Thanks her for her letter, but admits he was not very glad to receive it. Claims that he 'cannot the least realize [Minnie and his mother], under the new circumstances [the birth of Minnie's son Martin]'. Sends his love and congratulations to Minnie, and remarks that the news makes him feel old. Describes the family with which he lodges [the Lüdde-Neuraths] as poor since they only have one servant, and there is no wine, beer or pudding. The mother and daughters are engaged in housework all morning. Remarks, however, that they possess 'thorough unconstrained geniality; and considerable intellectual cultivation.' Explains that the son is serving as a volunteer in the Prussian army. Recounts some facts about the father, a doctor; he was a member of the Burschenshaft in 1823, when the Prussian government 'wished to crush the popular movement'. He was banished from his university and had to go to another one. Describes the theatre as his chief amusement in Berlin. Claims to like his teacher very much. Asks her to tell him when she next should write what her and Minnie's plans for the winter. States that he must pay his visits, but that he must 'go straight off to Cambridge' when he returns to England.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from Cambridge]:- Regrets that he cannot accept his Aunt [Henrietta?] Croft's invitation as he is engaged every morning from 8 to 2. Hopes to be able to go over to Bedford sometime, but it must be in vacation time. Talks of arrangements for meeting in winter, but announces that he wishes to spend the last month of the vacation in Cambridge learning Hebrew. Reports on Arthur's health and states that he is very cheerful and jolly. Hopes that William is coming to stay with him at the end of term. Comments on the weather, which had turned that day into 'what foreigners call "English weather".' Remarks that he was often taken for a Londoner in Germany. Reports that he is engaged now six hours a day 'in pure talking', and teaches for two hours a week at the Working Men's College; amongst others there, he instructs 'a converted Jew in the rudiments of Latin', who was 'brought by a queer enthusiastic Syrian traveller' whom they have among their fellows. Sends his love to his aunt and uncle [William and Stephana], and sends Arthur's love to his mother.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Thanks her for her letter. Reports on how his days are spent. Mentions William's visit to his family home. Is glad to hear his mother's good account of Minnie. Reports that he had a letter from Edward [Benson] some days previously; believes him not to be 'the right man in the right place', and thinks of him as 'thrown away' in his role as headmaster. In relation to a proposed stay at Sydenham declares himself to be 'tolerably indifferent', and states that he only wants to be able to see her and have the opportunity of quiet study. Thinks however that it might be a bore 'going and settling down for a short time [especially Xmas time] in a place' where they know nobody and have no introductions. Asks if her idea includes Edward and Minnie. Gives his own ideas in relation to how the time should be spent; 'paying visits vaguely and spending the rest of the time at Cambridge', and a week or so at Rugby. His idea, however, does not include William. Admits that he would enjoy being near London. Reports that Arthur is very well 'under his gymnastics' Announces that he is going on Tuesday to stay a night with a friend 'who has been among the D[ ] and [ ]'. Informs her that there is a little book about the latter by Lord Carnarvon. Asks if she has seen Dr [Joseph?] Wolff's life.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Reports that he finished his Marlborough examination on the previous Tuesday, and intends to cross the channel on Monday evening. Intends to stay one month in Paris with Graham Dakyns, and then shall probably spend a fortnight walking in Switzerland 'or somewhere', after which he shall 'probably settle down for a month in Germany', and return about mid-September. Supposes that by that time she will be well settled in Rugby. Regrets not having seen her at Wellington College, where he had a most pleasant visit. Was pleased to find both Mary and Edward so well. Comments on the ugliness of the new baby [Arthur Benson]; needs to do this to keep his 'character as a baby-hater', since he is 'compelled to join in the general Martin-worship'. Claims to have enjoyed his examinations on the whole, and to have been freer from hayfever than usual. Refers to the fact that 'poor Dale had lost two of his boys from Diptheria', and comments that it is supposed to be an unhealthy season at Dresden. Hopes to go there in the summer. Praises Marlborough, and reports that the boys 'are very nice and their relations with the masters more what one w[oul]d desire than at any other school with which [he is] acquainted.' States that he was very much interested in the Isle of Man, and was surprised to learn that his uncle Lace was a benefactor to King William's College there. Sends his love to his aunt.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from Liverpool]:- Hopes that Arthur 'settled about the bill all right.' Writes to inform her of his travel plans. Goes to the Isle of Man that day to examine there for a week, and in about a fortnight intends to go to Marlborough for another examination. In the meantime intends to call at Wellington College. Asks if they [Edward and Minnie Benson] can take him in, and if not he will go on to Eton after seeing her. When he shall come depends on his hayfever. Anxious to hear about her plans for the summer. Announces that he is going abroad after the Marlborough exam and will come home earlier than he otherwise would if she has a house. Reports that he has not heard from Rugby in a long time. Is not looking forward to a long sea voyage. Wishes now that he hadn't taken the examination. Refers to the Cambridge prizes and to the fact that Arthur won the prize for the composition of a Greek ode. Claims to be very glad that James Rhoades got the English verse, and believes that the disappointment 'will do Myers a great deal of good.' Asks her to tell Minnie that he got the papers all right. Hopes they are all well. Has ordered 'parcels and things' to be sent to Wellington College. Reports that he has been researching the Isle of Man. Asks her when she is going to see the Exhibition, which 'is only like a big shop-window', and claims that the day he spent there with Graham Dakyns he was more bored than he has been for a long time. Asks her to write to him in the Isle of Man.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from Lucerne]:- Expresses his appreciation at receiving her letter. Is sorry to hear that she has still all her troubles [with moving house?] before her. Announces that he shall not be going home until the end of September due to health reasons. Does not want to shorten his German visit, as he shall be in the company of some old schoolfriends from Rugby. He, Graham Dakyns, Green and Rutson set off the following day on their tour. They intend to spend twelve days in the Bernese Oberland, and then Henry goes off to Dresden. Reports that he and Dakyns enjoyed their stay in Paris, despite the fact that Bury Dakyns, who joined them there to improve his French, 'was the most awful bore.' Reports that he fell ill and had to stay some days at Lucerne, and that Dakyns is pretty well. Remarks on the heat on the continent, which is more dead and stifling than than in England. Relates that they met the [William?] Boyds in Paris. Tells her mother to write to him during the next week. Sends his love to his aunt and cousins.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from Dresden]:- Comments on the length of time it has been since he had a letter from her. Reports that the Swiss tour made him very ill, but that he has now recovered. Recounts that since he came to Dresden he has made a start in Arabic, read and spoken German, gone to concerts and the theatre, and spent time with his three friends [Dakyns, Green, and Rutson]. Refers also to his visits to the gallery. Had originally intended to leave Dresden on the 25th [September] and be in Rugby about the 29th [September] but has decided that he may stay a week longer and be in Rugby about 5 October. This, he calculates, will give him a fortnight at home. Has decided that he shall not go abroad again for a year or so. Announces that he has got his plan of reading 'tolerably settled', and it will absorb all his vacations. Hopes that his mother has got 'tolerably comfortable by this time', and refers Minnie's report of their mother's account of the house Remarks that Dresden is so colonised by English that 'one hardly feels in a foreign country'. States that the little church is well filled, and that the previous Sunday Dr Hook preached the worst sermon Henry has had the pleasure of hearing for a long time. Announces that he is going to join Edward and Minnie at the gallery.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Remarks that it seems 'an immense time' since he left Rugby, even though it has only been a fortnight. Reports that he had to move into other rooms when he first came up to Cambridge, as the floors in his own rooms were rotten. Is back in his own rooms now, where he has installed a new stove. Is glad that she enjoyed her visit to London. Wishes that he could have spent more time in the [Great] Exhibition, and comments on some of the works, including the statue of the 'Reading Girl' [by Pietro Magni], and Story's Cleopatra. Has recovered his watch from Wellington College. Comments that Minnie appears to be very busy. Remarks that there has been some theological excitement in consequence of Bishop Colenso's publication in the Guardian. Reports that it was believed for some time that the Reverend F.D. Maurice was going to resign his preferment, and come to reside [in Cambridge] 'in order to write freely on theological topics - but he has decided not to do so.' Reports that Kingsley is lecturing [very well] on America, and is writing in Macmillan's Magazine 'a child's tale [The Water Babies] so absurd that [Henry] almost thought he was cracked'. Hopes that his mother's legal difficulties will be resolved satisfactorily.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from Haileybury]:- Remarks on the unfairness of the fact that because Arthur does not write to her, she does not write to him: Henry arrived at this conclusion from a message he got from [J. M.?] Wilson when he saw him at Trevelyan's dinner. Reports that he is 'pretty well' and 'tolerably busy'. Has been examining a school lately, and has made good progress with his Arabic. Adds that his eyes are pretty well. Reports that Trevelyan has gone down for good; his father has been appointed financial member of the Indian Council and his son is to be his private secretary. Observes that Trevelyan is the last of the friends that he made as an undergraduate, but declares that there are lots of nice men still at the university, and that he has not lost the power of making friends. States, however, that he feels that he is growing old, and 'probably appear[s] a great Don to freshmen'.

Is anxious to hear the result of the Great Ladkin case; asks 'is the monster subdued or have [they] had to "eat the [Leck]". Reports that Mrs Kingsley enquired after his mother; Mrs Kingsley has had quite a long illness, from which she is now recovered, and he has not seen anything of the Kingsleys this term. Declares Miss [Rose?] Kingsley to be 'a very nice girl.' Asks whether his mother has seen Kingsley's letters in the Times, and comments that most people at Cambridge think that he has done good by them, but observes that he has been 'as usual hasty and one-sided.' Believes that the Manchester people ought to have spoken before. States that he saw Temple's letter, which was 'very good as always', and comments on his testimony as to conduct of manufacturers.

Reports that Arthur is very well, and that he himself is staying with [A. G.] Butler in Hertfordshire. He saw Miss Mulock, who was staying with [Alexander?] Macmillan, some days previously; she 'looks pleasant and sympathetic, yet hardly capable of the powerful delineation of passion one meets with in her books'; she is said to be 'odd' and to 'come to evening parties in her morning dress'.

Attributes his mother's epistolary silence to dissipation, and asks if everybody on the Bilton Road asked her out to dinner, and whether they shall 'entertain "all manner of Dukes" as Arthur says' when they return. Asks if any family catastrophe has occurred. Tells her if she meets any Trinity man she may tell them that [J. L.] Hammond is going to be Bursar. Declares that Mr Martin is looking better every week; that Professor Sedgwick is flourishing, and is expected to lecture the following year 'for "positively the last time" as he has said any time the last ten years.'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Announces that he will come down with Arthur on the 22nd [December]. States that William talks of coming to see him for two days 'on the Saturday'. Declares that his work is over, and that he is 'grinding' at Arabic and ethnology. His friends are 'all coming up from the different schools and it is very jolly'. Replies that she should not get him a ticket for the concert since he does not know if he shall come until the evening. Intends to bring his Arabic home with him. Reports that he has read Prehistoric Man [by Daniel Wilson?], but wasn't very impressed with it, and announces that there are 'some interesting scientific books expected by Lyall and Huxley, bearing on Primæval Man'. States that he looks forward to seeing Miss [Lucy?] Brown.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from Eton]:- Comments that it is very odd that he has received no books, and hopes that she has not forwarded any to [Roden] Noel's, whom he had left the previous Monday. Reports that he has been staying at Eton since Tuesday, and is going to Oxford the following Monday, until Wednesday. States that Arthur's degree is to come out on the Friday following. Asks if she has anyone staying with her. He was in London for one night, and went by the Metropolitan Railway [opened on 10 January 1863] on Monday: it is 'really most impressive - more so than any other "wonder of the age" [he has] ever seen'; it should be a 'great success', and there is 'no disagreeable smell'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Reports that he has been in Cambridge for a few days, but has not yet begun to work. Arthur is 'quite satisfied' with his degree, but many are disappointed. Enjoyed his visit to Oxford and declares that William's rooms are 'magnificent'. Conington introduced him 'to one of the "stars" of Oxford - Professor Henry Smith', who is 'a wonderful converser'. Saw Mr Martin that morning, who was looking very ill, and '[George or John?] Paget gives a bad account of him.'

Glad to hear about Katie Lace [his cousin, engaged to be married to the Rev. J. D. Wawn]. Remarks that the clergy of the Church of England 'generally perform their duty to Society in the way of matrimony if in no other way.' Announces that he begins lecturing the following day, and that there are 'piles of portmanteaus at the Porter's lodge just now.' Says that he has been reading 'A Woman's Thoughts about Women [by Dinah Mulock]', and that it seems to him 'more practical and vigorous tho' less refined than Miss [Anne] Browns books.' Asks if he left a racquet at Rugby.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Gratefully acknowledges receipt of her long letter [101/157]. Regrets to hear that his uncle Christopher [Sidgwick?] is going to law. In relation to ' "Colenso" ', does not expect his uncle 'to be converted to more liberal views at his time of life.' Believes that a crisis is coming on again in the Church of England, 'much like that of the Tractarians.' Discusses Colenso's book [The Pentateuch and Book of Joshua Critically Examined] in relation to the impending crisis. Regrets that no one has reviewed Miss [Anne] Brown's book. Wishes to cut his connection with the press, as it interferes with his study and does not improve his style. Declares that 'the Problems [in Human Nature' is not the kind of book he would like to write about. Undertakes to send Miss Brown 'Coventry [Patmore]'.

Confirms that he has read the Chronicles of Carlingford by Margaret Oliphant, part of which he compares with George Eliot, 'and one cannot give it higher praise, but the melodramatic element a little spoils it'. Wishes to hear his mother's views 'about Hymen [god of marriage] and the facilities for serving them', and asks if she thinks women are annoyed by the social restraints as much as men, since 'it does not appear in their books.' Says that he would like the American freedom, but doesn't suppose that she would. Discusses relations between men and women in America, compared to those in England. Declares that he is much obliged for Miss Brown's 'good opinion of [his] humble efforts'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from Paris]:- Gives an account of a wedding he attended recently. Refers to Roden Noel, whom he met in the Louvre. Claims to be enjoying Paris very much, and likes the Tuileries and the Champs Elysées 'as much as ever.' Admits not to be attracted by France as much as by Germany, and gives his impressions of Paris and of the French people. Thinks that he will leave Paris 'on Monday week', but may stay a day or two longer. Reports that Arthur is to leave on Thursday. Hopes that William is recovered from his attack.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Reports that he is well, 'pretty happy, and working very hard'. Gives an account of how he spends his day, including playing croquet after the afternoon meal. Reports that he is 'reading nothing but Arabic and lectures', and is lecturing on the Acts of the Apostles. Comments on the Times's treatment of Church extension. Mentions that he saw his and Arthur's old friend Festing that day, and they 'fraternized on the subject'. Enjoins her to read Gladstone's speech [advocating the imposition of income tax on Charities], saying 'never was he more splendide mendax, which Arthur will translate'. Reports that George [Gilbert?] Ramsay has written to ask him for a testimonial; asks her to ask Arthur to write 'something flowery about him'. Believes that Ramsay would be 'a good man for the Bear-Garden that a Scotch-lectureroom is said to be.' Fears that the Longsden-Warne job 'will be nipped in the bud.'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Thanks her for her letter and gift [a birthday present]. Declares that he has now passed 'what is said to be the dangerous age (as regards imprudent marriage)'. Considers staying in Cambridge during the Long Vacation, and says that the idea that it is 'insalubrious' in the summer is 'a complete delusion'. Reports that he went to London on Wednesday to a dinner party, and had a very serious attack of hay fever. Since 'a tolerably severe examination is near at hand, fears that he cannot come to see her as he had hoped to do that month. Reports that the living of Whitkirk has not yet been disposed of , but has heard that 'a late scholar of the college has just married on his curacy', and fears that his claims will be considered strong especially as he always went to morning chapel.' Expresses his surprise at the fact that Bob Mayor 'is going'. Asks if she has heard that Joseph Mayor is a candidate for the Professorship of political economy at Trinity College. Does not believe that he is the best man for the job, and states that he shall have to vote against him. Reports that he has just had three quarters of an hour 'at the Academy', and comments that he cannot conceive of 'anyone except a painter admiring the ghastly [Eve of] St Agnes', but states that the other two by Millais are 'wonderfully well-painted', though he wonders at the artist's choice of 'such trivial subjects.': 'There used to be some poetry in him: where is it gone to? His inspiration now seems about the level of Mrs Henry Wood's novels'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Inquires as to the plans of his family for the Long Vacation. Asks when she will be at Rugby and when she shall go to Wellington College. States that he still intends to stay in Cambridge, despite the reaction of his friends to his decision. Reports that the climate agrees with him, and that he 'revel[s] in Leisure'. Predicts that if he does not over-eat his health will be all right. Reports that he has got half-way through the irregular verbs of Hebrew. States that he wished to make the acquaintance of one or two undergraduates who will be more accessible in the Vacation than in term-time. Intends to leave his rooms for three weeks 'in order to avoid coming down with a [ ]'. Claims to have no particular predilection as to when he should go to see his mother, and wishes to know her plans. Reports that he is to examine at Wellington College sometime in July and intends to spend a week with Tawney sometime in August.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Asks his mother to forward a letter to Miss [Anne?] Brown, whose letter he has mislaid. Declares that he has fixed to come and spend September with her. Wishes to read, and thinks he shall spend August in Cambridge. Reports that he is getting on with Hebrew but very slowly. Predicts that he shall have read through I Samuel by the time he goes to Wellington College the following week. He intends to visit [C. H.?] Tawney after his exam there. Announces that he will pay his mother a morning call. Reports that the [Charles?] Bernards are living in Glamorganshire. Remarks that the Jews were a 'splendid people', but that the more he reads about them the more averse he becomes to the 'Bibliolatry of the day.' Observes that his is a disagreeable age in which to live; 'there are so many opinions held about everything and the advocates of each abuse their opponents so virulently that it quite frightens a modest man.'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Announces that he intends to come down the following week, leaving Cambridge on the Wednesday, probably spending a day with Roden Noel, and arriving home in or around Friday, or on Wednesday if the visit to Noel falls through. Does not feel that there is 'the least need that Arthur should try for a fellowship now'; he has discussed the matter with Lightfoot. Reports that he is still reading Hebrew, and has just finished Deuteronomy. Intends to continue reading when he goes home.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Discusses when he might come home, as he cannot decide on whether he should come a week hence or later. Tells her not to take him into account when filling the house, but asks her to let him know on Thursday or Friday whether his room is vacant or not. States that he will come on 24 December at the latest. States that although he is well read in Pneumatological Literature, he has not heard of the book mentioned by her, but undertakes to look for it in the University Library.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Thanks her for sending him Mr Smith's letter. Announces that he will answer his aunt's questions soon, and observes some of some of the passages she has put down are very difficult. Attributes this difficulty to the inconsistency of their interpretation with a belief in the immortality of the soul. Advises that she consult 'some "sound" person.' Reports that he is examining for the University Scholarship. Complains about his failure to apply himself to steady study, claims that he wastes a good deal of time. Reports that William is coming to see him in a fortnight.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Invites her up [to Cambridge] for Easter Sunday. Says that he will write again from town, where he is going to stay with his friend Cowell. States that he shall be back in Cambridge by the following Wednesday or before. Reports that he has begun reading at the British Museum, and praises the facilities there. Refers to an enclosed list of questions [not included] sent to him from his aunt, which, he admits, he has neglected. Observes that some of the difficulties are theological, not critical, and believes that the writers 'had at best a very dim realization of the immortality of the soul.' Undertakes to write to his aunt also.

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