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Literary works

A manuscript volume of poetry dated 1896-1900; a manuscript of a short play, possibly by Saxon Sydney-Turner; page 1 of a typescript entitled "The Need for Aestheticism"; a single page from a piece on prestige in art; a short piece on Duncan Grant and Vanessa Bell for South African art lovers; a typescript made in 1990 of Bell's memoir of Ottoline Morrell; the typescript "The Published Works of Clive Bell" by Donald A. Laing.

Notebooks

Three volumes: a notebook on French and Italian subjects, perhaps relating to a visit or visits to France and Italy, undated; a notebook on French subjects, perhaps relating to a visit to France (undated); a commonplace book (undated).

Papers of Clive Bell, Part II

  • BELL II
  • Fonds
  • 1896-1990

A supplementary collection of papers of Clive Bell which contains Bell's appointment diaries from 1913 to 1963 as well as a few literary items and material on the history of the Bell family.

Bell, Arthur Clive Heward (1881-1964), art critic and writer

Papers of Clive Bell

  • BELL
  • Fonds
  • 1902-64

Manuscript and typescript drafts of articles, lectures, correspondence and presscuttings

Bell, Arthur Clive Heward (1881-1964), art critic and writer

Letter from Sir Herbert Croft to Dawson Turner

(Dated Saturday. Probably written about the same time as O.13.1, No. 111.)

—————

Saturday

My Dear Sir!

The picture of my children 5 or 6 years ago, {1} but very like still, I sent, this morning; for you & Mrs T. to see. You can return it on monday; when I will beg you to lend Sophy another body-colour drawing, & Mary Anne another of Mortimer’s, w[hic]h I think Mrs T. was good enough to say she c[oul]d borrow. The bearer brings Mrs T.’s two, & their copies. Sophy has purposely made hers lighter, as I thought yours was too Penseroso; I being fond of the pleasant saddle honest Dryden mentions in his dedication of Virgil, “w[hic]h will be sure to amble, when {2} the world is upon the hardest trot”. Give me gay sunshine; or moonlight, w[hic]h does not add to the gloominess of scenes always gloomy enough.

Dont† forget, if we ever get a good day, to give Sophy a lesson in botany, at Downes’s garden, some morning; as {3} I expect she understands a little. When she leaves Yarmouth (in a fortnight or so, I im-agine) she will, I am sure, be happy if Mrs T. can charge her with any commissions in Town. Tomorrow ev[enin]g I mean to come & sit with you.

Ever most truly y[ou]rs
H. Croft

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Letters missing from words abbreviated by superscript letters have been supplied in square brackets.

{1} Presumably the painting of his three daughters as cherubim, attributed to Lemuel Francis Abbott, now in the possession of the National Trust.

{2} This word, which is at the beginning of a line, is preceded by opening inverted commas.

{3} This word resembles ‘or’ more closely, but ‘as’ makes more sense.

† Sic.

Letter from Sir Herbert Croft to Dawson Turner

(Dated Saturday. Probably written about the same time as O.13.1, No. 111.)

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Transcript

Saturday.

My Dear Sir!

Your letter is manly & friendly, like yourself. I take your confidence as a high compliment, & I trust you consider’d my application in some such way. I must do the best I can; but we will never talk of so unpleasant a subject, about w[hic]h I thank you as much as if you c[oul]d have serv’d me. Your heart w[oul]d bleed for me, did you know my situation & how I have been us’d. The man I paint at the end of my Poem was (God knows!) an example of happiness, compar’d with me. But, never mind.

I will come & sit with you, & be apparently as merry as usual, any evening you send me word you are at leisure after so long absence; & I will always be,

My Dear Sir,
your grateful & affect[iona]te friend
H[erber]t Croft.

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Letters omitted from words abbreviated by superscript letters have been supplied in square brackets.

Letter from Sir Herbert Croft to Dawson Turner

(Dated Friday. Probably written about the same time as O.13.1, No. 111.)

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Transcript

Friday morn[in]g

My Dear Sir!

Let me welcome you home again, & I wish I had better news about myself. Yet, it is not bad, for my affairs are settled; only I know not which way to turn myself, at so critical a moment, & not having been able to see my immediate friends since my arrival, without a little pecuniary aid. If you & Mr Gurney (to whom I did not choose to apply in your absence) c[oul]d assist me, for perhaps a very short time; it w[oul]d be a particular convenience to me, & w[oul]d prevent the settling of my affairs from being almost ineffectual. I sh[oul]d hope to be able to repay it as soon as I got to Town (the middle of next month, when Lady Croft returns out of Cheshire); but, not to engage for more than I am sure of, can you oblige me with £150 till October, when at Michaelmas I am pay’d my midsummer rents? You will show this to Mr G. to whom I have not said a syllable. Such kindness cannot make me more than I am,

My Dear Sir, Your oblig’d friend
H[erber]t Croft.

—————

Letters omitted from words abbreviated by superscript letters have been supplied in square brackets.

Letter from Sir Herbert Croft to Dawson Turner

(Undated, but probably written about the same time as O.13.1, No. 111.)

—————

Transcript

My Dear Sir!

A thousand thanks for your & Mrs T.’s kind civilities about my daughters! It was my intention to have call’d & said we w[oul]d not give the trouble of coming to dinner; but, as Mr Gurney said it was arrang’d, I acquisce’d, & bagg’d him to say we w[oul]d have that pleasure.

And, now, my Dear Sir, whose friendship it gives me so much happiness to have made here, let me beg of you & Mrs Turner to serve me in another respect. You know how well I take correction as a poet, & you shall see I will bear it as well as a father. I beg you both, of whom I think so highly, to tell me what you think of my daughters; & what I can seek to alter. They have been the whole object of my life, both before I went abroad & since. As I have no son, & my first wife’s property & my own (which, on the falling-in of ground-rents in London, must shortly be above three thousand a year) must, on my death, go among my three daughters, equally, by settlement, or to their children or the survivors; I have spar’d no expense, to qualify them for the situations they have a right to, in this odd world.

But {1} my great object has been to keep all three (of course, the eldest, principally) from being coxcombs—to give them that good sense, w[hic]h is worth every thing—& to qualify them to be a comfort to a father, &, at a proper time, to a husband. Not being able to leave this place (but I hope, now, that all will soon be settled by Lady Croft & her friends), & their mother in law being employ’d about my affairs, I made them come hither; & I own that I am nearly satisfied, considering the eldest was only 18 last august. {2} But I shall long, much, to know Mrs T.’s & your real sentiments. Both of you, as parents yourselves & now looking forward about your own children, will excuse a parent’s anxiety about his; especially, when there is not any thing I would not do to prove to Mrs T. & you how truly I am,

My Dear Sir!
your most oblig’d & affect[iona]te friend
H. Croft

P.S. | May I beg you to send me those printed papers tomorrow morning, with Mrs T.’s real opinion? My daughters know nothing about that.

—————

Letters missing from words abbreviated by superscript letters have been supplied in square brackets.

{1} Written as a catch-word at the foot of a page and repeated at the beginning of the next.

{2} Sophia Croft was born on 18 August 1781.

Letter from Sir Herbert Croft to Dawson Turner

Transcript

Wednesday 22nd Jan[uar]y 1800

My Dear Sir!

My daughters particularly thank Mrs T. for the drawings. Since she was good enough to offer, & my eldest daughter {1} only mixes water colours & lead (having nothing else here), I will thank Mrs T. to lend the box of body-colours she show’d me; of which my daughter will be as sparing as possible, & carefully return the rest. Indeed, they are going away, in a week or a fortnight, with Mrs Walker & Lady Irvine: which brings me to a request.—I wish them much to having the honour of knowing Mrs T.; that they may have a claim to see her, in my house or houses of their own, hereafter, when she wanders from Yarmouth: I wish them to see a Lady, whom they have repeatedly heard me mention as a model of a wife & a mother: & I sh[oul]d like to know whether Mrs T. do not think that few girls of 18 have the good sense of my eldest daughter. The greatest obligation Mrs T. can confer upon me, is to let me introduce my children to her, the evening that I read the tragedy; w[hic]h, too, they have not heard. Never mind M. Septmonville, about whom I spoke before. The sooner we fix, the better. Mr Gurney’s poem {2} is, now, finish’d; so he will not be occupied. It will be a most creditable, elegant, manly thing. Make him keep the lines to his sister; {3} w[hic]h are Ditto, as above.

Yours ditto, as ever, very faithfully
H. Croft.

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{1} Sophia.

{2} Presumably Cupid and Psyche: A Mythological Tale, from the Golden Ass of Apuleius, by Hudson Gurney, published anonymously by J. Wright, ‘opposite Old Bond Street, Piccadilly, London’, in 1799. Dawson Turner’s presentation copy, which he supplemented with a portrait and autograph of the author, is in the British Library (General Reference Collection 11632.g.2). A second edition appeared in 1800.

{3} Hudson Gurney had one full sister, Agatha, who married Sampson Hanbury, and two half-sisters, Elizabeth, who married John Gurney Jr, and Anna. See W. H. Bidwell, Annals of an East Anglian Bank (1900), p. 400.

Papers of L. S. Bosanquet

  • BOSA
  • Fonds
  • 1938-1983

The collection consists primarily of a long series of research notebooks beginning in 1938 and running through to the early 1970s. Additionally, there are some student notes and notes of G. H. Hardy's lectures, which complement those of Bosanquet's brother-in-law E. H. Linfoot.

Bosanquet, Lancelot Stephen (1903-1984), mathematician

Cutting from a newspaper, containing verses by Thomas Mott entitled ‘Lines written near the Ruins of a Monastery’

(On the page to which this is pasted is a note by Dawson Turner, dated 6 Mar. 1840.)

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Transcript of note

Tho[ma]s Mott, the author of the above, was a correspondent of mine in early life; but of his letters I appear to have preserved none. He was clerk to Ja[me]s Sayers at Yarmouth, & afterwards practised as an attorney at Cambridge, where he brought a sad career to a premature end. We made a tour to Derbyshire together in 1795. He was a man of quick talents, with considerable taste for poetry, & still more for drawing Caricatures.

D.T. Mar. 6. 1840.

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Letters omitted from words abbreviated by superscript letters have been supplied in square brackets.

Papers of Edwin Montagu, Part II

  • MONT II
  • Fonds
  • 1889-1968

This collection, the second accession of Montagu papers received at Trinity, comprises papers of Edwin Montagu himself, with various related additions. It includes correspondence between Montagu and his wife Venetia, both before and after their marriage; telegraphic correspondence between Montagu, as Secretary of State for India, and the Viceroys Lord Chelmsford and Lord Reading; parts of Montagu’s second Indian Diary; letters from Montagu to his mother and father, Lord and Lady Swaythling; and a few letters to Montagu from various correspondents, including H. H. Asquith, Winston Churchill, and members of the Stanley family. The items added after Montagu’s death include press-cuttings of obituaries, and correspondence about the sorting of the papers in the 1950s.

Montagu, Edwin Samuel (1879-1924), politician

Letter from R. H. Inglis Palgrave to W. Aldis Wright

Transcript

Belton. Gt Yarmouth.
11 Feby 1895.

My dear Wright,

I enclose the statement {1} now, I hope, in a complete form. Should you wish anything else to be said or any alteration made only let me know. The collection will supply curious bits of information to future historians—if they will work it over.—& I am much obliged to you for arranging so kindly that it should have an honourable resting place in your fine College Library.

I am glad you can give a good report of yourself this arctic weather.

Yours very truly
R H Inglis Palgrave

—————

{1} O.13.1, No. 4.

Letter from R. H. Inglis Palgrave to W. Aldis Wright

Transcript

Belton. | Gt Yarmouth.
14 Novr 1890.

My dear Wright,

I have heard from Mrs Jacobson who is very glad that her Fathers correspondence should rest within your Walls, & will willingly present it to the College.

The collection is at my home, here, I will have it properly packed & seen to, but as I have to be away next week for a few days on business it will have to wait for my return—But I will attend to it as soon as I can, & I will write you word again before it is sent off to Cambridge.

Yours very truly
R H Inglis Palgrave

Letter from R. H. Inglis Palgrave to W. Aldis Wright

Transcript

Belton. | Gt Yarmouth.
27 Sepr 1890.

My dear Wright,

You will remember my speaking to you here about the correspondence of my Grandfather the late Dawson Turner. He was in the habit of binding the letters addressed to him, & hence accumulated during a long & active life a considerable number of letters, some from persons of mark in their way, & curious also as illustrative of life & habits from, roughly 1790 to 1850. He was in early life, much devoted to botany, & there are among the letters a good many from botanists on the Continent which Joseph Hooker tells me illustrate the early progress of the Science. Afterwards Mr Turner directed more attention to archaeology—& there are letters on this subject also.

I have taken out of the volumes all the private letters, & those from members of his Family.—this however does not detract from the interest of those which remain.

My question to you was—Will your College Library give an acceptance permanently to these 50 to 60 Volumes. If you say—yes—I will ask Mrs Jacobson, who is the present owner to consent to this arrangement.

Mrs Jacobson is now an old Lady—& as I am constantly reminded of the miserable lapse of time—I shall be glad to settle this matter. Will you kindly assist me.

I am sorry we have not seen more of each other—or rather that I have not seen more of you this year—but I hope we shall do better in the future.

Yours very truly
R H Inglis Palgrave

Letter from Sir Herbert Croft to Frederick Bush

Transcript

Yarmouth;
Monday, 9 Dec[embe]r 1799.

Sir Herbert Croft returns Mr Bush {1} the vol. of Johnson containing the life of Young, {2} with many thanks. He will thank Mr B. to say to Mr Turner, the banker, that, from what he has heard of him in different quarters here, it w[oul]d afford Sir H. C. much pleasure to have the honour of making the acquaintance of Mr Turner, & to show him something that he is writing. But he, first, wishes Mr Turner to look at a book he publish’d on the continent; that he may see, by that & by the french dedication at the end to Sir H. C., how he has employ’d his time abroad; &, by the copy of Bishop Douglas’s letter at the beginning, that he has no occasion to blush for what drove him abroad. {3}—On account of his situation (w[hic]h he trusts will end very shortly, when Lord & Lady Dysart & Lady Croft {4} come from the Isle of Wight to Helmingham in Suffolk), Sir H. C. wishes the liberty he has thus taken with Mr Turner not to be known; especially, too, as the jealousy of others, here, might take offence.

—————

Letters missing from words abbreviated by superscript letters have been supplied in square brackets.

{1} Frederick Bush, a Yarmouth bookseller, who reprinted Croft’s Chatterton and ‘Love and Madness’ in 1800.

{2} The life of Edward Young in Johnson’s Lives of the Poets was written by Croft himself. Croft’s Letter from Germany (see below) contains an epigraph from Young’s sixth Satire.

{3} The book referred to, a copy of which appears to have accompanied the present letter, was probably A Letter from Germany to the Princess Royal of England on the English and German Languages, which Croft published at Hamburg in 1797. This does not contain a letter from Bishop Douglas or a French dedication but it is possible that those items were copied in by hand. According to Gilbert Burgess (Introduction to The Love Letters of Miss H and Mr R, 1775-1779), there is a letter in the British Museum (Egerton MSS 2185) from Croft to Bishop Douglas, ‘in which he complains of having been cold-shouldered by Pitt, whose favour he had tried to gain by offering to insert verses in favour of that politician in book he was writing’, and another (Egerton MSS 2186, ff. 88-93) to Bishop Douglas’s son, the Rev. W. Douglas, ‘written from Exeter Gaol, “the common prison—pudet hoc opprobria!” as Croft says, where he was imprisoned for a debt of £40, which he hopes Mr Douglas will send at once.’

{4} Lady Dysart and Lady Croft were sisters.

Note by R. H. Inglis Palgrave

(Carbon copy of a typed original. The subscription and the date were added by hand.)

—————

Transcript

CORRESPONDENCE OF DAWSON TURNER. Esq. F.R.S.

The correspondence contained in these 83 volumes consists of the letters received by Mr Dawson Turner between the years 1790 and 1851.

Mr Turner was originally entered at Pembroke College of which his uncle, Dr Joseph Turner, afterwards Dean of Norwich, was then Master, but after a year’s residence, owing to the illness of his father, James Turner, he left the University for the Banking house of Messrs Gurneys and Co, Great Yarmouth, in which his father was a partner.

Mr Turner became a Fellow of the Royal Society and of other learned societies. He corresponded with scientific men and foreign botanists from whom various letters will be found especially in the early volumes.

The collection is indexed throughout following the names of the writers.

Private letters from members of his family and others have been removed from the collection though they are referred to in the Index.

These volumes were presented to the Library of Trinity College in 1890 by Mr Turner’s last surviving daughter, Mrs Jacobson, widow of Dr Jacobson, formerly Bishop of Chester, and this statement is written by Mr Turner’s grandson,

R. H. Inglis Palgrave. 11 Feby. 1895.

Letter from Augustus Maimburg to Dawson Turner

Transcript

Aleyor {1} 10th April 1800.

My dear Sir

I have, to my great Satisfaction, received 2 of your Letters dated 8th jan[uar]y & 9th feb[ruar]y which with one of the [blank] that I received about a Month ago make up the whole; but as you say we must lay all the Blame upon the Elements & the Carelessness of post Offices & consequently I will write away as regularly as I can & trust Providence for their reaching you.

I conceive by your Letter that you have not received the large parcel of Sea Weeds that I had sent & entrusted to an Off[ic]er of the 28th Reg[imen]t that was going to England & who promised to forward it; at any Rate I have some more collected which I Will send by the first Opportunity & write you by Duplicata† the Name of the person & that of the Ship. & Sh[oul]d any of my Acquaintances go to England I shall entrust them with the Collection of Sea Trees that I have in Readiness but they are most of them of so fragil† a Nature that I am very much afraid you Shall receive only Dust.

Now, I will, as it appears to me that you have not received any Letter posterior to that in which I mentioned the unpleasant Difference existing in the Reg[imen]t, relate again what has passed since & that you will find of a much more pleasant Nature than I at first expected & that your Friendship made you apprehended {2} for me.– – –Shortly after the Sentence which suspended Cap[tai]n Fortye from Rank & pay for 6 Months was known & he had besides been reprimanded by Gen[er]al Stuard under the Colours of the Reg[imen]t, the Col[one]l & Major were put at Coventry by the Majority; the Gen[er]al looked at it as at an Act of Rebellion & one day at Dinner one of our Captains, Brother in Law to Brigadier Gen[er]al Oakes received a Note from him “come Immediatly† to me or you are undone”; he showed it to another Cap[tai]n who was the leading Man of the party against the Colonel who took the Hint & with another went to the Commander in Chief & explained & apologised for their Conduct, it was then settled & made known to every off[ic]er by those Gentlemen, that the Coventry was at an End & Harmony perfectly reestablished betwixt Col[one]l Drummond & us, they Shook Hands with him &c. but fear alone had compelled them to that & their resentment still existing they continued to seize every opportunity of vexing the Col[one]l as going all away after Dinner if he stayed & remaining all in the Mess Room if he went &c. shortly after thinking themselves the strongest they found fault & upbraided any off[ic]er that w[oul]d not do as they did & we were all in a state of Warfare against each other; then I thought it was Time for me to explain my Sentiments upon the Subject; I loudly declared that they all knew I had never shown that I had adhered to the Coventry when they had decreed it though it was against my Opinion, but that having them-selves (I spoke to the Ringleaders,) declared to me & to us at large, that all animosity was to be laid aside by it & that I was allways† ready to stand by the Body of the Off[ic]ers I w[oul]d not be influenced in any part of my Conduct by any Individual; an Intimate Friend of mine (L[ieutenan]t Evans of Birmingham) took warmly my Part & professed the same principles, so did a few others, the Majority was against us but from the (I know I speak to a friend who will excuse it) Superiority of a Good Cause & that of our personal Characters from that Moment we held it out in a firm & Manly Manner; you well may think how much Col[one]l D[rummon]d was pleased at our Conduct & from that Moment I have (& evans) {3} been his declared favorite†; the opposite party tempted a bold Stroke, in a drunking† Match One of them spoke inso-lently to Evans who rebuked him properly, next Morning they went out & the opposition Gentleman Apologised in the most submissive Manner, ever since our Victory has been Compleat & ever since I have the Satisfaction to see the Epaulet bearing Mob returned to a Sense of Duty & every thing going on as smooth as possible.—now to come to myself; Col[one]l Drummond applied shortly after for me for a Company in the 2 Comp[an]ies of Corsican Rangers that were forming here, the Gen[er]al answered that they were both disposed of but that he w[oul]d think of me in Case any more sh[oul]d be raised; on the 6th March at morning parade Col[one]l D[rummon]d asked me if I w[oul]d take the Adjutancy of the Corsicans, that those 2 Comp[an]ies were to be rassembled at Aleyor under the Command of Major Bisset (42d Reg[imen]t) & wanted an Adj[uta]nt, I positively declined it saying (these were my very words) “No, Sir, I never will resolve myself to be a Slave to my Commanding Off[ic]er & a Spy to my Comrades” {4} but after parade our Major who professes to be my friend & Capt[ai]n MacMurdo who is really it, expostulated with me on the subject, Col[one]l D[rummon]d joined them & told me that it was the Sure Road to a Company, that I was the only Off[ic]er fit for it here & that B[rigadie]r G[ener]al Oakes w[oul]d never pardon me if I declined his offer, at last they prevailed upon me to say Yess† & next Day Gen[er]al Fox sent for me, asked me a few Questions & told me I Sh[oul]d be put in Orders for it the same Day; I thought it was my Duty to tell them all beforehand that I had not the least Idea about the very complicated Duty of an Adj[uta]nt but he & Oakes said I w[oul]d learn it in Time, that knowing the Language & the Men’s Disposition was the Material point & so I went & have been here ever since the 11th March; they have given me 3 sh[illings] a day extra pay for which Sum I must do the different Duties of Adj[utan]t, Q[uarte]r Master, Paymaster, Drill Serg[ean]t Clark & Interpreter I never had so much on my Hands before but I am getting into it more & more every […] {5} if the forced Extension of my Voice in giving the Words of Command & Ex[…] 4 Times a Day had not hurted my Lungs & given me now & then some […] painfull Spasms I w[oul]d say it is all for the better; every Body says that I will get a Company very soon, God knows! at any Rate I lead a very active Life & I like it, I learn my Duty & that cannot be but useful & I make myself known to the great Folks, & that is the only Road to preferrment† for a Man without Money or Interest;—now I must answer to your kind Recommendations upon the Subject of losing the half pay by my passing into a Reg[imen]t that is not upon the Establishment, the Fact is that it is a Standing Rule that coming from the Establishment I cannot lose half pay but by the Sentence of a Court Martial & the Corsicans in Particular, have an Act of Parliament that grants them every privilege of a true born Englishman; I thank you again, my dear sir for your anxiety On that score but rest perfectly assured that sh[oul]d I be promoted in that Corps Capt[ai]ns half pay is as sure to me there at peace as if I was in the Guards.—although I now live far from the Shore be assured, my dear Sir, that I shall not neglect collecting & forwarding Sea weeds so that sh[oul]d you get only the 10th part of what I collect you will have enough. the Swiftsure has been here lately & I shall enquire for your Acquaintance on board of her if ever she comes back as well as for Mr Robert Cappe though by the bye there is no place here of the Name that you mention (Charles Town). to give you now a faithfull picure of the place I am in, imagine the nastiest dirtiest village that you ever saw in the most wretched part of Wales & it is a thousand times better than this; no Meat to be had except the salted Rations & fish the only thing that can be got extra, costs 3 sh[illings] a pound & is not to be had every Day; God allmighty† bless you my dear Sir you & your friends, I beg you will make the expression of my Gratitude for their kind Remembrance acceptable to them & my best respects to Mrs {4} Turner in particular. Wholly yours for ever.

Maimburg.

[Direction:] Dawson Turner Esqr | Yarmouth | Norfolk.

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Postmarked with a stamp dated 3 June 1800 and a Foreign Office stamp the date of which is illegible. There are a couple of postman’s marks, one perhaps ‘11’ struck through, the other ‘1/7’. Letters missing from words abbreviated by superscript letters have been supplied in square brackets. Maimburg’s quotation marks resemble wavy equals signs.

{1} This place is now known as Alaior.

{2} Substituted for ‘fear’. Maimburg should have written ‘apprehend’.

{3} ‘& evans’ interlined; no caret. Brackets supplied.

{4} This word is indistinct.

{5} Some letters in this sentence were torn away here with the seal.

† Sic.

Letter from Augustus Maimburg to Dawson Turner

Transcript

Fort George Minorca {1} 16th 7ber 1799

my dear Sir

I have differred† some time to write to you being in a very melancholic disposition & I did not wish to trouble you by the recital of the occasion of it but as it may possibly have consequence of an unpleasant Nature which perhaps w[oul]d injure me in your Mind I thinck it best to acquaint you with it.

about 10 days ago being on Guard with one of our Capt[ai]ns {2} at about 8 o’clock P.N.† our Col[one]l {3} who was coming from Mahon found fault with one of my sentry’s & a firelock that was outside of the Guard Room & being a little heated with liquor I must suppose taxed me of Neglect; the Capt[ai]n of the Guard provoked at that came up to him & told him that he & not me was Com[man]ding that post & was answerable for every thing in it they begun a very warm Conversation in the Course of which the Col[one]l kept brandishing his stick as if threatening to strike him & after that he ordered him to be relieved & to be under arrest, a General Court Martial has been the Consequence of it & I have been heard as an Evidence I have been interrogated & Cross examined for three hours & a quarter & as you may suppose spoke the whole truth & nothing but the truth, the 2 G[uar]d Off[ic]ers one of whom was president & the whole court had the goodness to pay me a great many Compliments upon the clearness, precision & impartiality of my Evidence but the Col[one]l disappointed in his revenge & disappointed only by my Evidence that happens to be the only compleat & important is I am told incensed (how unjustly you may judge) against me though till now I have had it acknowledged by my superiors that they never saw me neglecting any part of my Duty I am a man & may once fail & then I must fear the worse, at least my peace of Mind is gone, accustomed to enjoy the Esteem & good will of my superiors as well as of my brother off[ic]ers I cannot bear the Idea that in Case I sh[oul]d accidentally fail in some point of my Duty instead of a friendly admonition I must expect to feel the whole weight of authority armed by hatred & perhaps for a trifle be brought before a Court martial to the injury of my Character. at any rate you may be sure that I shall redouble my accostumed† vigilance & that I have great Hope of disappointing his hostile intentions & I rely upon providence for not putting me to any of those hard trials where human prudence is vain I have another consolation which is to see my Conduct universally approved (for the first occasion of the Dispute has been found by the judges vain & frivolous.—23d sept[em]ber. not having yet found any Opportunity of sending my letter I will continue the journal of our uncomfortable Life, the storm that I expected has now begun to break out; under a frivolous pretence our Col[one]l has publicly exposed in public Orders 11 off[ic]ers of the Reg[imen]t & taxing them of Mutiny (N.B. I am not one in the number) {4} invites them to quit the Service, our Duty is made as hard & uncomfortable as possible, we can scarcely dispose of an afternoon in the Course of the Week, Our Servants cannot go out of the fort without a pass on purpose &c. &c &c. that Conduct has so much incensed the Reg[imen]t that the Colonel & the Major have been put into Coventry, (that is to say that no officer is to speak to them or even answer any question but upon matters of service)†, under pain of being himself put into Coventry). you can now easily imagine what a Hell I am in; but Our Position is so violent that it cannot last long & by doing my Duty with exactitude I can hope to see better Days, as this is the Moment of the Crisis I will not close this letter before it is over. 26 Sept[em]ber. contrary to every Body’s Expectation the Court Martial has found Capt[ai]n forty Guilty & condemned him to be publicly reprimanded under the Colours of the Reg[imen]t & to be suspended of rank & pay for 6 Months the Court besides has publicly reprimanded one Capt[ai]n & one L[ieutenan]t of the Reg[imen]t for seeming want of Candour in the ones & inconsistency in the other’s Evidence all that has put the Body of off[ic]ers in a still greater Rage than before in Consequence of it the Reg[imen]t has been represented to the Commander in Chief (sir james Erskine) as being in actual insurrection, & we now expect some severe Lecture thank God having left the Mess ever since the 7th instant I have not been present to any thing & for those 3 days past I have been blessed with a violent toothake† and a fluxion which will I hope keep me confined in my tent for a Week more. I write by this same Opportunity to Col[one]l Couper to remember to him his promising to get me a Company in some new raised Reg[imen]t & I hope in these present Circumstances it will not be difficult to get it. General Steward who has a new raised German Reg[imen]t here said the Day before Yesterday that if he had known me only a Month sooner he wd have given me a company in his Regt (he was president of the Court Martial). & so if he obtains leave to raise a second Battallion† what is not unlikely I may perhaps be promoted. I never wished so much for peace or promotion in the first Case to take my half pay, & at any rate to get out of this Reg[imen]t.

1st August.

I am very happy to be able to inform you my dear Sir, that a kind of peace has taken place in the Reg[imen]t. the Coventry is taken off but the brotherly affection will not I am afraid be so easily restored. I am going next Week on Detachment at Alcoufa for a fortnight & I hope to augment considerably there my collection of sea plants but I don’t know how to send them & even if I find an opportunity I am very much afraid that the most beautiful will be broke to pieces before reaching England; I am very much afraid that you dont receive my Letters more exactly than I receive yours this is my 5th & I am convinced you [ha]ve {5} written to me some, though I have received none of your Letters yet. if you cou[ld …] {5} any Body at portsmouth to enquire when men of War sail for here it w[oul]d be Very safe & it happens almost every month, or else write by way of Lisbon through falmouth. we are all here very much vexed to be confined in this accursed Island instead of being employed in Holland & I am more vexed than any one to be so far out of the Way now that Col[one]l Couper’s friendship could so easily have got promotion for me in the German Corps that I understand are beginning to be raised. but patience! the rainy Season is beginning now but I brave it under my Marquise, if you have a plan of Minorca I am situated upon the ruins of the N.W. ravelin of the Queen’s Kane {6} facing to philipe, & commanding the Entrance of the fort. I hope my Letter will go to Morrow may it reach you safe & so many yours me I never felt so much the want of them. farewell my dear Sir & believe me for ever wholly yours.

A. Maimburg

this is to go by way of Leghorn by a regular pacquet twice a Month write to me the same Way.

[Direction:] Dawson Turner Esqr | Yarmouth | Norfolk. | England

—————

Postmarked with a stamp dated 4 December 1799 and a Foreign Office stamp with the same date. There are a couple of postman’s marks, one of which is probably ‘1/7’. The first part of the letter was written on 17, 23, and 26 Sept. The second part, which is dated 1 Aug., was probably written on 1 Oct. Letters missing from words abbreviated by superscript letters have been supplied in square brackets.

{1} In 1798 a British force captured Minorca from the Spaniards, and on 6 May 1799 the 8th Regiment of Foot, with whom Maimburg was serving, set out for that island, where they were stationed for the next twelve months. See R. Cannon, Historical Record of the Eighth or King’s Regiment of Foot (1844), p. 74.

{2} Thomas Fortye.

{3} Gordon (later Sir Gordon) Drummond.

{4} ‘N.B. … number’ interlined; no caret. The brackets have been supplied.

{5} The seal conceals a few letters here.

{6} Reading uncertain.

† Sic.

Index, 1800-1

(Most of the entries for 1800 and 1801 are grouped by year and arranged in alphabetical order, but there are some additional entries for both years at the end.)

Index, 1790-1800

(The entries for 1790-9 are grouped by year and arranged either in chronological order (1790-3) or in alphabetical order of correspondent (1796-9), while the entries for 1799 and 1800 are mixed together in alphabetical order. Entries for Nos. 21-5 (letters from Turner to his mother) were added at the end in the same hand as the preceding entries. A few entries were added later by Dawson Turner.)

Correspondence of Dawson Turner

General note

The volumes in this collection were made up and bound in a uniform style during Turner’s lifetime. Since the contents of the first volume include a transcript of an obituary of September 1833 (No. 116a), this must have taken place some time after that date. Each volume has a printed title-leaf and an index (headed ‘Contents’), and some have collections of seal impressions mounted behind a hinged panel inside the front cover. The printed titles all begin, ‘LETTERS | CHIEFLY | ON LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC SUBJECTS, | ADDRESSED TO | DAWSON TURNER, | DURING THE YEAR’, the relevant year or period being printed below, with the following epigram: ‘Quemnam ego thesaurum amicorum epistolis permutare vellem? Epistolae sunt amicorum absentium colloquia; nec absentes modo per has adsunt, sed et mortui resuscitantur. Longo tamen post tempore legentibus afferunt amari lugubrisque multum, quamvis dulcedine non sine mira: per coemeterium amicorum bustis repletum, sed et violas rosasque ubique redolens, incedere videmur. AUCT. ANON.’ (Later volumes have ‘SCRIPT. INCERT.’ in place of ‘AUCT. ANON.’) The information in the indexes is sometimes incomplete or erroneous.

Inside the front cover of each volume is a printed bookplate bearing the following text: ‘BIBLIOTHECAE | COLL. SANCT. ET INDIV. TRIN. CANTAB. | DONAVIT | ELEANORA JOANNA JACOBSON, | DAWSONI TURNER FILIA, | ET | GULIELMI EPISCOPI CESTRENSIS VIDUA. | A.D. 1890.’

Note on the present volume

On the spine is stamped ‘CORRESPONDENCE | JAN.-DEC. | 1790-1801’. There are two title-leaves, one for the years 1790-9 and one for the years 1800-1, and two corresponding tables of contents. Turner has marked many of the letters with the date of his reply, and added pencil dates at the head of most of the letters which are either undated or dated at the end.

Turner, Dawson (1775-1858), banker, botanist, and antiquary

Index

(The index is arranged in alphabetical order of the correspondents’ names.)

Letter from Henry Weekes

Will visit Trinity and wishes 'to come to a decision as to what will be best to be done with the Statue' [of Francis Bacon].

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