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Trevelyan, George Macaulay (1876–1962), historian, public educator, and conservationist
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Letter from G. M. Trevelyan to J. G. Frazer

Garden Corner, West Road, Cambridge - Is part of a group of people who are trying to bring pressure to bear on the German government, which has begun reviewing dossiers of academics and dismissing them. Sends a document for Frazer to sign which will be presented to the German government and which will be signed by the Vice Chancellor, the Master of Trinity, and Lord Rutherford; they are also asking Eddington, Hopkins, Pope, Housman, and he will sign himself.

Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

The Gallows, Ryton, Dymock, Glos. - Thanks for the testimonial: a majority of the Board [of the Liverpool Repertory Theatre, see also 1/108] favours Abercrombie's appointment but a final decision has not yet been made, and he himself is unsure, particularly about the prospect of spending nine months a year in Liverpool. Expresses sympathy for Trevelyan's brother [George] in his "trouble" [the death of his son Theodore].

Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

34 Percy Street, Liverpool. Asks how to get in contact with Trevelyan's brother George in order to contribute to his Red Cross organisation in Italy, on behalf of John Yates of Woodhead, Blackburn; he does not know him himself, but they have mutual friends (Prussian Poles). He himself is working on munitions, and has enlisted for the war if he is approved. His family may join him in Liverpool if he is kept on there.

Postcard from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

Crowfield, Dymock, Glos. - Will be at Dymock for a month or two, hoping to do some work. He approves the "Annual" [a follow-up to Trevelyan's publication of 1917?] though Marsh is bringing out a "G.P." ["Georgian Poetry"] at Christmas and they might clash. He himself wants to publish in book form in the autumn; "Empedocles" would do well for the "Annual", though it is not yet finished. Delighted to hear Trevelyan is in England; he should stay if he can. Saw Trevelyan's brother George the other day. A postscript says that the two books ought not to clash if Trevelyan takes care.

Postcard from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

Sends Trevelyan's cap. He and his wife are much grieved at the cause of Trevelyan's departure [the sudden death of his nephew Theodore]; they hope to see him and his wife soon. Asks if Trevelyan could write to C. H. Reilly a formal testimonial, regarding Abercrombie's suitability for the post of literary adviser to the Liverpool Repertory Theatre. There will be a board meeting on Wednesday and Reilly is chair [see also 1/37].

Copy of letter from Max Beerbohm to George Macaulay Trevelyan

Handwritten copy, on printed paper from the Master's Lodge, Trinity College, Cambridge. Beerbohm's letter is dated Abinger Manor, 11 Feb 1941, and addresses G. M. Trevelyan as "Master of Trinity." Beerbohm honoured by the proposal that he should deliver the Clark Lectures, but now feels that he has 'no great co-ordinated body of views on any subject' and must decline. Offers a parody of Leigh Hunt ["Jenny Kiss't Me"] to express his gratitude at the offer. A postscript records his deep affection for Trevelyan's brother Bob.

Letter from Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson to R. C. Trevelyan

Kings Coll Camb. - No chance of visiting Trevelyan before leaving for the continent on 9 August. Asks if Trevelyan has a copy of [Richardson's] "Clarissa Harlowe" which he might borrow. Asks what he thinks of George's appointment [G.M. Trevelyan's appointment as Regius Professor?]; Dickinson is glad, though surprised George was willing to take it.

Letter from E. M. Forster to R. C. Trevelyan

Harnham, Monument Green, Weybridge. - Is returning Leonardo. Will not go to Munich for now, perhaps in the new year. Draws attended to his amended address: the old house name, Glendore, was 'a bit much'; the are settling in, and he hopes to join the new Literary Society if invited. Is going to see 'The Knight of the Burning Pestle' at Cambridge tomorrow: asks if he is right in remembering that Trevelyan doesn't like it. Wishes that Trevelyan would move into his new house quickly, as he wants it for some 'people' of his [a reference to "A Room With A View"?]; also would like him to provide one 'with something to do and something to die of' . Saw George [Trevelyan?] the other day. Sends regards to Trevelyan's wife; he and [Hugh Owen?] Meredith called on her cousin but he was not there. Will be at West Hackhurst for the new year.

Letter from E. M. Forster to R. C. Trevelyan

West Hackhurst, Abinger Hammer, Dorking. - Would be delighted for George [Trevelyan?] to use an extract from his aunt's [Marianne Thornton?] memoirs: 'she would have been delighted too'. Sends the chapter he thinks Trevelyan has in mind. George is also welcome to use 'the two large vellum volumes of letters'. Is going to Plymouth to help his mother with the 'tiresome business' [of selling off his great aunt Eliza Fowler's house and effects after her death]. Is sorry C.A. [Clifford Allen] is ill.

Letter from E. M. Forster to R. C. Trevelyan

W[est] H[ackhurst]. - Thanks Trevelyan for his "Dream": can't say anything about its technique; thinks it read easily for the most part. Finds the part which considers whether 'culture' will continue most moving; agrees that 'if Love did - or could - worship Reason it would be best', though is not sure whether Christ is what he means by Love. Max [Beerbohm?] should be pleased with the reference to his Bacon. Hopes Trevelyan has sent a copy to Leonard [Woolf]. Sat by George [Macauley Trevelyan] at the Feast at King's and went to lunch with him, when he showed Forster some of his books; Robin Meyer and A. V. Hill [?] were stopping there. Is reading Moliere.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivy Holt, Dorking. - News of the birth of the Frys' son; Helen is doing very well. Went riding at Cambridge with Goldie [Dickinson], was thrown and hurt his calf, only just returned in time for the birth and is still hobbling around. Saw a great deal of George [Trevelyan?] at Cambridge: has just finished reading his book ["England in the Age of Wycliffe, 1368-1520"] which is 'capital' except for the split infinitives. Hopes Bessie is well again. Asks for Trevelyan's opinion, 'as a euphonist', on whether the baby should be called Sebastian Edward or Julian Edward.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Chantry Dene, Guildford. - Is sorry not to have seen Trevelyan: Helen came to his lecture which meant 'anxious preparations', but all went well which is a sign of real progress. Is very sorry to learn from George of the Trevelyans' worry about Paul: has heard of a good German medicine for indigestion called Sauerin. Is going to see Margery at Birmingham this week, but asks if Trevelyan could visit next Sunday. Best wishes to Bessie.

Letter from John Luce to R.C. Trevelyan

King's College Cambridge. - Thanks Trevelyan for letting him know about the "Abinger Chronicle", to which he will subscribe for at least six months. The [Apostles'] Society has met for the last time this term, probably for the duration of the war. [Matthew?] Hodgart has been called up: he read a very good paper on 'Truth' from the Marxist angle, at the meeting when Wallich and Hobsbawm were elected; G. M. Trevelyan was there, in fine form. Now only Luce, Champernowne and the two 'newly-born' are left: Andreas Mayor is training for the infantry; Wilfrid Noyce is the only active member of the society to object, and with a Quaker ambulance in Birmingham; Oliver Kisch is working for his final law exam in London and waiting for a commission in the Tanks. A postscript records that he has met [Hugh] Sykes Davies in a pub, who took him to a far corner to talk 'sedition'.

Letter from Desmond MacCarthy to R. C. Trevelyan

9 Cheyne Gardens, S.W. - Thanks Trevelyan: the MacCarthys would rather have £5 [as a wedding present] as they are only half furnished. George [Trevelyan?] has been to dinner. He should not renounce "The Speaker": the new editors have let it down but there will be two dramatic criticisms, one causerie and one review per month by MacCarthy, no more [Arthur Clutton-] Brock. Sketch resembling William Blake's "I want! I want!" after the signature.

Letter from Desmond MacCarthy to R. C. Trevelyan

2 Garrick's Villa, Hampton, Middlesex. - Is glad that Bessie will be at the Shiffolds when he visits; asks if he can stay till Tuesday or Wednesday; they will certainly play chess. Is bringing something to read aloud to Bessie which he hopes will make her laugh. Expects he will miss 'the silent Miss Simpkins'. Asks if the Wedgwoods [Ralph and Iris] are at home. Dining with George [Trevelyan] last night, who was 'brisk' like Henry Sidgwick as remembered by MacCarthy and Trevelyan, and was not wearing any teeth. They discussed autobiographies and historians; George confessed he had never read Gibbon's "[Decline and Fall of the] Roman Empire"; MacCarthy did not tell him that one of his favourite autobiographies was 'that of Robert Calverly Trevelyan' [sic] as he is not sure if it is finished; his own is 'rather good, but rather scrappy'.

Letter from Desmond MacCarthy to R. C. Trevelyan

Thanks for Trevelyan's letter of advice about the article. Has his 'back up' against the Ind[ependent] Rev[iew] at the moment: received a cheque from Jenks for his review which was 25 shillings short of the sum agreed. Does not mind writing 'for love', but does object to having his 'wages chipped at the discretion of that little shit'. Asks for total discretion: must speak to George [Trevelyan] first if he decides to complain. There has been a fight outside the office: Udale had his nose 'scraped'. J. Burns [John Burns?] is probably going to be sued by Harris for libel; this too can only be mentioned to Trevelyan's wife. Would like to visit soon; will bring 'the black wallowing unprofitable & the Marie Kov [?]'. A postscript, reading 'Sir, my name is Otto. Why not make my initials D.S.O?' may be a reference to the Trevelyan's son Paul.

Letter from Desmond MacCarthy to R. C. Trevelyan

Garricks Villa. - Very sorry to hear from Bessie that he is ill, and has been worse; however, George got over his far worse pulmonary attack, and the Trevelyans are tough, like 'not a few of the old families in England'. Wants more news, but is writing to Bessie and Catherine Abercromby [sic: Abercrombie?] so Trevelyan should not trouble to write himself. Discusses the pleasure he gets from Trevelyan's writing, which if 'civilisation founders' due to expanding population, 'sentimental humanitarianism... coupled with practical callousness' and 'scientific technology' (television, for instance, is an 'asinine invention') has been loyal to the 'sinking ship'. Met a friend of Julian's recently, who told him that Julian is happy and has found a partner [Mary Fedden], and that Ursula has also found 'consolation' [Norman Mommens]; Trevelyan and Bessie must be relieved. Had a letter from Dorothy Moore yesterday, with two pots of marmalade, saying that Moore was well. Molly wants to 'hoof him out of England' for a while for his health, so he plans to stay with Somerset Maugham at Cap Ferrat in March, and would like to see Trevelyan before he goes; thinks he will ask to Iris and Ralph [Wedgwood] to put him up so that he can visit without being a strain at the Shiffolds.

Letter from Desmond MacCarthy to R. C. Trevelyan

8, Cheyne Gardens, S.W. - Has seen George [Trevelyan]. The difficulty with MacCarthy's Butler article [for the "Independent Review"?] is that Butler's friend Jones has let him see Butler's private diary and papers, and MacCarthy must show him what he has written before publishing. Is busy on Cobden, but is not sure whether he will get it into the "Westminster [Review]" before Saturday. Will try to see Trevelyan on Thursday but does not think he will be able to stay the night. Spent an hour with George and Janet yesterday evening; George read some of his "History" out, then MacCarthy 'discoursed about Japan'.

Cuttings, mostly relating to the death of Desmond MacCarthy.

Review of Trevelyan's translation of Socrates' Ajax by J. T. Sheppard, "Athenaeum", 30 Jan 1920; review of Lascelles Abercrombie's "The Art of Wordsworth" by Desmond MacCarthy, "Sunday Times", 8 June 1952; obituary for Desmond MacCarthy, "The Times", 9 June 1952; obituary for Desmond MacCarthy, with an 'appreciation' by 'C.V.W', "Manchester Guardian", 9 June 1952; piece on MacCarthy by G. M. Trevelyan, "Sunday Times", 15 June 1952; "Marginal Comment", on Desmond MacCarthy, by Harold Nicolson, "Spectator", 20 June 1952; Reader's tributes to Desmond MacCarthy by Martyn Skinner, Oxford and T. F. Harvey Jacob, Waterford, unknown publication and date.

Letter from Dorothy Moore to Elizabeth Trevelyan

86 Chesterton Road, Cambridge. - The doctor came yesterday and was pleased with George: it is not a coronary thrombosis, as feared, but just a 'tired heart-muscle' and he will soon recover. George has been up since breakfast and won't go to bed until after dinner; he is not to go to Trinity on Thursday for the presentation of a silver inkstand and Sheffield tray with silver tea service to the Master and Mrs Trevelyan [on G. M. Trevelyan's retirement as Master of Trinity], but will sign the address which the Vice-Master will bring round tomorrow. Has been very busy herself: her father was here for a month and needed much attention, so it is probable she did not keep an eye on George. There has also been the excitement of the O.M. [Order of Merit] which thrilled her father, although the boys have taken it casually; there have been lots of letters of congratulation, and people coming round for tea. George is looking forward to seeing Bessie when he goes to Leith Hill Place next month.

Letter from G. E. Moore to Elizabeth Trevelyan

86 Chesterton Road, Cambridge. - Is glad she liked the Gainsborough card, which he thinks is charming and worth keeping; Dorothy disposes of most of their cards, perhaps to hospitals, but he always keeps a few; reminisces about the scrap-books he and his siblings used to make while his father read aloud to them; he still has his books. His health was good enough for him to go to Buckingham Palace three weeks ago to get his 'badge and ribbon from the King' [the Order of Merit]; he also took Tim to the Christmas Feast at Trinity and saw George [Trevelyan] for the first time since he had retired as Master. Is hoping he will be able to come to Leith Hill Place next summer: was very disappointed not to be able to come. Also thinks well of Britten: very much enjoyed his "Let's Make an Opera", and Tim thought well of "Peter Grimes" and other things by him; not sure about "Billy Budd" when he heard it on the radio, however, thinking it 'scrappy' and full of what Vaughan Williams calls 'wrong notes'. Thought [Roy] Harrod's life of [Maynard] Keynes was not well judged, but he had not noticed exaggeration of the influence of Bloomsbury. Had forgotten that Norton stayed with the Trevelyans when he was ill; was very fond of him. Bessie seems to imply Bloomsbury harmed him; asks if this is what she thinks. Agrees that it is a good thing that [his niece] Riette has gone to live at Well Walk; Tim went to see them there and had a nice time; thinks Riette very charming. Is sorry Bessie has been laid up by neuralgia, but is glad Dr Bluth's treatment seems to have improved it.

Letter from G. E. Moore to Elizabeth Trevelyan

86 Chesterton Road, Cambridge. - Is sorry that he did not see Desmond [MacCarthy] at all when he came to receive his honorary degree: George Trevy [Trevelyan], with whom Desmond was staying, let him know that he needed to rest after the ceremony and then he was too ill to visit Moore. He and Dorothy went to Desmond's funeral in Cambridge, in George Trevy's car. Is hoping he will be well enough to come to Leith Hill Place this summer, and to see Bessie then. Was glad to hear from Mary Fletcher that Bessie has a satisfactory couple as gardener and cook.

Letter from Umberto Morra di Lavriano to R. C. Trevelyan

I Tatti, Settignano, Florence. - It is very kind of Trevelyan to say he will send Morra Virginia [Woolf's] new book ["The Years"]; he has promised to review it by the middle of May. Met Trevelyan's brother George here recently and was amused by the resemblances and differences between them. George's wife [Janet] seemed 'very pleasant', and B.B. is revising his first thoughts about her. Alberti is here. Mary's health is up and down but she does not 'look at all badly'. Will return home when B.B. and Nicky [Mariano] start for the Aegean.

Letter from Umberto Morra di Lavriano to R. C. Trevelyan

I Tatti, Settignano, Florence. - Is very grateful for the pains taken by Trevelyan [regarding Morra's translation of G.M. Trevelyan's "British History in the Nineteenth Century, 1782-1901"]. Arrived at I Tatti yesterday to find all well; Mary in bed with a cold but cheerful; all as usual except for Trevelyan's absence, which Morra feels deeply. Asks one further question about George's book. Moravia is not related to 'De B.' so Mrs [Sylvia] Sprigge is right. Is very sorry to hear about D[onald] Tovey [his illness].

Letter from Umberto Morra di Lavriano to R. C. Trevelyan

Metelliano. - Thanks Trevelyan for his "Collected Poems". Has been invited to translate his brother George's "British History in the Nineteenth Century" into Italian, though it is currently a secret as negotiations are still in progress; is reading the book now and feels the job will be enjoyable, if long and maybe hard. Has also been offered the chance of translating "Pericles", but does not feel prepared to cope with Shakespeare. Hears Mary [Berenson] is preparing herself for a journey to England and taking motor-rides; thinks this is only a psychological improvement, but that is a great deal. Does not yet know whether B.B. [Berenson] is going to Yugoslavia.

Letter from Umberto Morra di Lavriano to R. C. Trevelyan

Metelliano. - Thanks Trevelyan for sending his "Plays": likes receiving this present 'from you and from England in such a moment of anguish'. Has finished translating G. M. Trevelyan's "British History in the Nineteenth Century" for Einaudi [see 5/88] and now must go over it; it will be with the publisher around the end of February. Has found work on it 'a relief'; likes the first part of the book better than the second and thinks the picture of 'old England' and the transistion due to the Industrial Revolution is 'masterful'. Discusses the notes he must add, particularly the quotations; asks if he could submit queries to Trevelyan, or directly to his brother, and outlines his thoughts on whether quotations should be translated [this section is marked with blue]. Saw Mary [Berenson] at I Tatti just after her return, cheerful though frail; B.B. [Berenson] and Nicky [Mariano] are now in Rome. Hopes Trevelyan is not anxious about Julian.

Queries from Umberto Morra di Lavriano to R. C. Trevelyan, with responses from Trevelyan

List of quotations [from G.M. Trevelyan's "British History in the Nineteenth Century, 1782-1901"] for which Morra would like to know the source. These are marked, presumably by R.C. Trevelyan, with either a blue circle or red question mark.
List of further passages for which Morra would like an explanation.
R.C. Trevelyan's responses to some of Morra's queries, either supplying sources or saying that he has forgotten them.

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