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Robins, Elizabeth (1862–1952), actress, writer, and feminist Image With digital objects
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Letter from Elizabeth Robins to F. W. Pethick-Lawrence

(Steyning Police Station, and) Backset, Henfield, Sussex.—Describes her visit to the police station to register as an American. Recalls her stay with the Pethick-Lawrences in London.

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Transcript

Oct. 30. ’14
Backset, Henfield, Sussex

My dear Mr Lawrence:

You have been wondering—or no, you will have realized why I have not written more than that line of thanks for the cabled news.

I wont† go into any boring details, but I haven’t been up to much. I must put off making any further plans for a few days longer. I had to turn out today—grey & drizzling—for what do you think? To take the train to Steyning & to register myself as an American. Here I sit in the Steyning Police Station waiting for the return of Supt. Airs from Lancing—tho why he is in Lancing after saying in reply to my letter that I was to come with as little delay as possible, I leave you to —

Later

At that moment he came in but has again gone out to see to some one else. I have often won-dered how your book is prospering. Dont you find it very difficult in these days to concentrate yr. thought? I do ‥ & yet the imaginary world is a refuge at times from the real. We are lucky, you & I, to have two.
Oh these Jacks in office! ‥ this creature with the waxed mustachios & the air of being Ruler & Guide to the Universe … has been somewhat impertinent & I am ruffled. I wd have said these were more German than English manners. I wait now for a cab for the rain is heavier now.

Home again

This letter was to be more than anything my warm & never forgetting thanks for those days in that magical island of peace & comfort in the midst of Babylon—tho’ Babylon wasn’t a sea as I seem to be making out. There is something special about 119—I like to remember what you told me of its history . . . & quite sure am I, that the spirit that went to the gift has taken up its abode there, to rest & make glad not only the woman it was dressed for but her friends. And yours, may I say? I am too exhausted to write Miss Start tonight as I intended. But tomorrow.

Yours most sincerely,
Elizabeth Robins.

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† Sic.

Letter from Elizabeth Robins to F. W. Pethick-Lawrence

Rounton Grange, Northallerton.—Thanks him for copies of his speeches. Is consulting an American lawyer about some business requiring a knowledge of American law in the far South. Is disappointed that her English lawyer, Frost, has transferred her business to his son.

Letter from Ernest Thurtle to F. W. Pethick-Lawrence

Ministry of Information.—The proposal that Elizabeth Robins should be brought to England to speak and broadcast on Anglo-American understanding has been rejected on the grounds that she is ‘rather old for as full a programme of meetings as would justify an Atlantic passage at this time’.

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