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Fry, Roger Eliot (1866-1934) painter and art critic
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Draft letter from R. C. Trevelyan to [Jean Marchand]

On headed notepaper of the National Liberal Club, Victoria Street, S.W.1. - On returning to London, he talked to Ruth Fry, Roger's sister, who is the president of the 'Mission des Amis' [Friends War Victims Relief Committee]. She said that communication with Russia was very difficult at the moment, but that if Marchand wants to arrange to get his niece [actually Olga Lewitska, daughter of Sonia Lewitska -see 22/56] out of Ukraine, it would be best to write to [Maxim] Litvinoff at the Hotel Cosmopolite, Copenhagen, asking for his help and advice as the one responsible for admitting foreigners to Russia and getting them out. Ruth Fry doubted that Litvinoff would consent to helping with such a case, but it might perhaps still be worth trying, and strongly suspected that it would not be possible to get the girl out. Might be possible to send letters to Kiev through Litvinoff.

Trevelyan will write to [Francis] Birrell to go and see Marchand as soon as he arrives in Paris; Roger Fry will also give his advice when he arrives. If it is better to send a letter as soon as possible, advises him to write to Litvinoff and send that letter to Trevelyan, who will ask Ruth Fry to send it as she is in communication with Litvinoff; this may make him pay more attention to the matter. Necessary to decide before writing whether they want to try and get Marchand's niece out of the Ukraine, or simply to send letters. Wishes he could give more definitive advice, but will do his best to help if he sends a letter. Marchand knows how much Trevelyan is sorry for the pain Madame Marchand [Sonia Lewitska] is experiencing at the moment, and how much he would like to help if he could.

Memorandum by R. C. Trevelyan regarding his friendship with Roger Fry

Brief account of how Fry inspired a love of art in Trevelyan (previously, like "most Cambridge men.. completely ignorant of art') when they shared a house in Chelsea, and of Fry's life and character. Describes Virginia Woolf's biography of Fry as giving 'a very fully account of him, which seems... not only imaginative and sympathetic, but just and true'.

Notebook with translations and other works by R. C. Trevelyan

List of books on flyleaf, including [R.G.?] Collingwood's "An autobiography". Autobiographical fragment, including Trevelyan's childhood 'courting' of a girl at dancing class, friendships including two 'of an emotional, romantic kind' at Harrow, and thoughts on Keats's "Ode to a Nightingale". Translations: of first part of Sophocles' "Philoctetes"; the "Homeric Hymns to Pan, Dionysus, Aphrodite and Demeter; fragments of Greek New Comedy by Menander, Alexis and Philemon.

Book used from other end in: draft verse [translation?] on inside cover and flyleaf; list of possible topics under the heading "More Windfalls", including '[George?] Meredith', Reminiscences', '[Donald] Tovey'. Draft piece, "On losing one's bearings". Verse, 'Oh sea and shore, dearer to me than life...'. Ideas for "Less Simple Pleasures" under headings such as 'Literary', "Of Friendship', 'Of Walking'. Essay of pleasures of the senses. particularly touch. Piece about Horace and his friendships, perhaps as introduction for Trevelyan's two fictional dialogues about him, or part of the subsequent discussion of conversation. This mentions Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson, Roger Fry and Donald Tovey (Virginia Woolf and Lytton Strachey are also mentioned but Trevelyan then crosses this out)'; Henry Sidgwick, his father's friend, is mentioned as a 'perfect artist in conversation'. Discussion of philosophical dialogues. Biographical sketch of Thomas Sturge Moore. Piece on aging and desire. Notes on playing chess with Dickinson. Notes on Montaigne. Bertrand Russell and Bernard Shaw. Essay on the self, Buddhism, and change.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R.C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Bob's book ["Polyphemus and Other Poems"] came out just after everyone had left Cambridge, but George will do 'all [he] can for it next term'. Likes it 'so very much', and has ordered six copies to give as presents. Thinks Roger [Fry's] illustrations 'very romantic and beautiful', and that they 'illustrated and explained & enlarged the idea of the poems a great deal'. Discusses the poems; thinks "The [Lady's] Bat" 'much the best thing' Bob has done, and 'in the way the most serious'. Lord Rosebery's speech 'a funny business': he 'said things that any Pro Boer would have been lynched for saying' after criticising pro-Boers 'more strongly than anyone'; George hopes what he says will 'get into common parlance'. Says that he himself 'went mad for two months last autumn... and saw men as idiots walking'; he wrote 'an exceedingly mad article... in which a lot of truth was buried in a hopeless amount of bunkum'; hopes Bob will not judge him on it if he sees it.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

The Old Hotel, Dungeon Ghyll, Langdale, Nr. Ambleside. - Bob and Roger [Fry] will be pleased that a 'memorial [memorandum] about Finland" which is soon to be sent to the Duma [Russian Parliament] has been much signed by British MPs. Has had a long talk with Cecil Spring Rice, the British minister at Stockholm - not [his relative] Tom - who knows about the affair as the 'Swedes are so deeply interested'. There is some hope that the 'change may be of a more limited character than is threatened'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Edward Marsh

5 Barton St. - Bob's 'old woman' [housekeeper] told him when he returned [from Italy?] that a 'young man in a cab with a portmanteau' called when he was away; seems that Edward 'appeared at no 14 [home of Crompton and Theodore Llewelyn Davies] hunting for a lunch'; hopes he found 'a friend or restaurant in time' as he knows his friend needs 'constant supplies... to stave off dissolution', like moles which cannot go without worms for more than twelve hors. Went round to Bruton Street yesterday, but found that Edward had gone back on Sunday; this means he missed meeting 'a rose of Shiraz, the direct descendant of the one which intoxicated Hafiz... You would have had this rose, had you been here' but instead Bob 'took it round to [Roger] Fry, who fell violently in love with it, and fell to painting it' [this appears to refer to the first meeting between Fry and his future wife Helen Coombe]. Supposes Edward is caught up in 'the last act' of his academical careers [final exams]; he should not be 'despondent and doubtful'. Tells Edward to excuse his 'sermons', but not his spelling, as he swears 'never to look at or correct' a letter to him again, 'after the outrageous fables' Edward circulated about his 'beautiful and chaste letters from Italy'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Edward Marsh

Hotel Scapolatielli, Corpo di Cava (written on printed notepaper for the Hôtel de Londres, Gênes - crossed out). - Marsh's letter gave Bob much pleasure, since the 'stupid people at Naples' have not yet sent his first on; his address 'hints fascinating suggestions of rustic English scenery, and milk drunk and mild-maids beflirted in dairies'. Asks if Marsh is alone, or whether this letter is '"solus ad solum", as Flaubert used to write to Maxime Ducamp'. Read [William?] Archer's review of the plays produced by the Independent Theatre [Society] in the "Pall Mall Budget", and supposes it was 'in some slight degree inspired by' Marsh's; hopes this 'wonderful pale-faced black-haired [man: Lugné-Poe, see 15/322]' will still be in London when he returns at the end of the month; asks if it was Titian's portrait of Ariosto Marsh was reminded of. Has read Maeterlinck's "Intruse"; did not feel anything strongly for the writer, but would not like to have written the play: did not think the 'poetical or romantic element to which realism was totally sacrificed... was not quite good enough', that Maeterlink was 'not the right man to do it well, but that he could imaging 'a real poet doing something very wonderful in that line'. Glad Oswald [Sickert] 'has seen the last of those Beautiful Englanders' ["Beautiful Britain", published by the Werner Company]; remembers Marsh talking about Sickert's second novel a while ago and thought he had said it was finished, so asks whether this is a third. Asks whether [Stanley] Makower's book is out yet.

Marsh seems 'to have been going the round of our distinguished men pretty thoroughly'; makes Bob 'writhe with envy to read your account; would particularly like to see [Robert] Bridges, and means to make Roger [Fry], Bridges' nephew, take him one day. Has a book of Bridges' verse with him here, which is 'very readable and at times very beautiful'; Fry is 'enthusiastic' about him, and reads Bob passages aloud from "Prometheus [the Firegiver]"; Bob thinks 'a calmness and gentleness of tone and harmony about him... seems to make him a sort of painters poet'; hopes Marsh was 'not badly shown up' for his 'neglect' of Bridges' recent books. A man called [Henry Charles] Beeching lives with Bridges [he in the Rectory at Yattendon, Bridges in the manor house there; Beeching married Bridge's niece] and 'has just published a volume of milky poetry for which Roger has done a frontispiece' ["In a Garden and Other Poems"]; Roger says they quarrel with each other 'off and on in a mild chronic sort of way'. Asks whether Marsh saw Beeching.

Is living an 'ideal sort of life here'; describes his daily routine of exercise, study and meals; he eats omelettes, risotto, 'some wonderful things they call fritelli', for which he gives instructions and states his intention to continue making them in England. His work is 'just as mysterious' to himself as it is to Marsh; does not have the 'faintest idea what it is going to turn out' as; the plot is a 'puzzle' to him, the style is he knows 'vicious and unnatural as a rule' though he hopes it is good sometimes, and the important thing is to get it finished. Has the greatest difficulty finding names for his characters; his hero is called Benedict, 'an awfull name... which mercifully shortens into Bendy'. Badly wants a name for 'a sort of Jim Stephen who has not gone mad' but has achieved nothing due to 'an incorrigible laziness and want of enterprise'; he is in danger of losing his wife to the hero. Bob was just creating a character called Paul who was turning out 'without my intending it, uncommonly like you'; Marsh's letter has made him realise with 'horror' what he was doing and he may have to take Paul out. The character is engaged to a very charming girl who is like someone Bob knows. Hopes to be back in England in about three weeks; intends to 'plunge into an incredible carreer of gluttony [sic] and Pantegruelizing'.

Letter from Arthur Waley to R. C. Trevelyan

Department of Prints and Drawings, British Museum, London: W.C. - Trevelyan can certainly let them publish the Su Tung Po poem in the UDC [Union of Democratic Control?]; asks only that his name not be used; does not think he has anything else similar; is sorry 'Wieger spoils the story of Wu-ti. He would'. Thinks the plan with Roger Fry [to publish a book] will come off; Fry does not want illustrations, and Waley hopes he will allow the cover to be plain; does not 'mind as long as it doesn't savour too definitely of Bloomsbury, 1917'; Fry was 'awfully nice'.

Letter from Leonard Woolf to R.C. Trevelyan

38, Brunswick Square, W.C. - Found many books on his table when he returned which he thinks are a present from Trevy: they are 'extraordinarily nice'. Supposes Trevy is now in the East. his sister [Bella?] leaves Ceylon on 20 November, so that introduction will be no use if he arrives after that. They had a 'splendid time abroad in France, Spain & Italy' [on their honeymoon]. Spain seemed 'the finest & most incompetent country in the world'. Has a temporary job as secretary to the Grafton Galleries for the Post Impressionists [exhibition organised by Roger Fry], where he 'daily explain[s] Picasso to the unending stream of the population of London' and is 'astonished by the honesty of mind of the English public', but wants to get something permanent or writing work. Trevy said he would give Leonard an introduction to Bruce Richmond on their last meeting; asks for this as he thinks it would be a 'great thing' to get work for the times. The are leaving Brunswick Square, and will probably take rooms in Clifford's Inn.

Letter from Virginia Woolf to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Monk's House, Rodmell, near Lewes, Sussex. - Was 'delightful' of Bessie to write about Virginia's life of Roger [Fry]; in her comparison of it to a 'piece of music', she appreciated 'exactly what [Virginia] was trying to do'. Virginia is 'not regularly musical', but 'always think[s] of [her] books as music before [she] writes them'; this was particularly true in the autobiography, where there was 'such a mass of detail' that the only way she could manage was by 'abstracting it into themes' which she attempted to 'unite' in the first chapter, then introduce 'developments & variations' before bringing everything together at the end, just as Bessie saw. Thinks she is the only person to have felt what she was trying to do. Was often 'crushed under the myriad details'; found the necessity to mute or only hint at some things difficult; there was also 'always a certain constraint, which one doesn't feel in fiction, a sense of other people looking over one's shoulder'. Very glad that Bessie and Bob, who both knew Roger well, think it is a 'true portrait of him'; Bob 'went all through his life', even though as often happens they did not see each other as often towards the end. Understands Bessie being shy of Roger, she was not 'exactly shy' herself, but 'sometimes felt overpowered, & so, uneasy'. However none of her friends 'made such a difference to [her] life as he did', which she needed to 'keep under' when writing about him.

Hopes they will meet up; they [she and Leonard] will be often in London this winter, but 'everything's difficult now'. Very sorry about Bessie's eyes; asks if it affects her music.

Letter from Thomas Sturge Moore to R. C. Trevelyan

Congratulates Trevy [on his engagement] and wishes him 'all happiness'; on hearing about it beforehand from [Charles] Holmes and [Laurence] Binyon, who had heard through [Sydney] Cockerell and Trevy's cousins the Fletchers, he had 'refused to believe it' due to what Trevy had told him about 'Mrs Costello[e] having tried to put about such stories'. However, when his sister heard the same from Miss [Bonté?] Amos, who said she had got the news from Trevy's mother, he 'had to allow it might be true'. Thinks Trevy will 'make a good husband', but that he will 'spoil all [his] children with indulgence' and thinks he should start being 'very stern' with himself so that he is able to look 'cross' enough at them; knows he is talking 'as if the little Homers and Aeschylluses [sic] and a Sappho or two were bound to turn up' and hopes they will. Keen to meet Trevy's fiancé; hopes she is not 'too like George' and suggests that the only indication which Trevy has given as to what she is like ''is very misleading and puts one deeper into darkness than total ignorance'. Asks how long Trevy has know her, and if she is 'connected with the admirers of the Dutch Milton [Vondel?]' whom he met at Taormina. Is to get a hundred pounds for editing Shakespeare [for the Vale Press] and fears it will take up a lot of time, so cannot promise to write an epithalamium. [Roger] Fry is 'of course quite wrong about Bellini', whom Moore admires as much as Fry does, but denies that he is 'characterised by passion by pathos or by Virgillian [sic] melancholy'; Bellini is a 'far greater master than Altdorfer' though Fry seemed to think he was comparing them. Sorry that Trevy is troubling to copy out Moore's "Danaë"; he could easily have got two copies made; hopes he will 'suggest how the hard sentences can be made easy, & the crooked straight, at the same time as pointing out their deficiency'. Hopes Trevy's fiancée 'will prove a Muse... though she is not going to enter the lists as a rival'.

Letter from Frank Previté to R. C. Trevelyan

3 Temple Gardens, E.C. - Is 'delighted to hear of [Trevelyan's] engagement'; sure it will be the 'best possible thing' for him, and his friends will 'all look forward to some great work as the result of the change'. [Herbert James] Craig also sends congratulations, and says he hopes Trevelyan has 'jettisoned the dum-dum bullet bearing the inscription 'avenge Majuba' [a reference to the Boer Wars]. They were 'amused' to learn his real reason for travelling to Florence by way of the Netherlands. Sure his fiancée must like him 'very much to abandon such a name as hers [des Amorie van der Hoeven] even for one so comparatively charming' as Trevelyan. Thanks Trevelyan for his 'very kind appreciation' of his own book ["My Great Discovery", published under the pseudonym Henry Francis]; knows it will not be a 'great success', but hopes it will find the approval of his friends; understands that Trevelyan regards it as 'an experiment and a promising one', and does not himself 'regard it too seriously'; has been 'cheered' however by a few good reviews. Is keeping his authorship secret 'locally' and amongst his relations, but would be pleased for any 'pushing' of the book Trevelyan can do; most 'flattering' that he will give it to Miss van der Hoeven. Will be 'delighted' to see him settled at Dorking in the summer; asks to be remembered to the Frys if he sees them again.

Letter from Sonia Lewitska to R. C. Trevelyan, with postscript from Jean Marchand

Thanks Trevelyan for his letter and what he has done to help her: it is a 'great moral path' for her, and she hopes that with the help of a heart 'as great and generous' as Trevelyan's, she will be able to 'remedy this misfortune'. She encloses her letter to [Maxim] Litwinof and also that to her little one [her daughter Olga]. Adds in a postscript that she is also enclosing her letter to 'the sister of Monsieur Fray' [Roger Fry's sister Ruth, general secretary of the Friends War Victims Relief Committee]: asks him to read it, and if he does not think it too foolish to give it to her; also to let her know the response as soon as possible. If there is no hope of sending a Quaker to search for her daughter, she will go herself immediately to Warsaw (she is applying for her passport) and perhaps there will be a way of getting to Kiev from there. Marchand despairs and does not want her to leave because she is so weak; she is made worse due to her 'torment' [of worry for her daughter]. She went to the Ukraninian mission [embassy?] again yesterday, and spoke there to a colonel who came from Kiev a month ago, who says that Kiev has become a 'totally dead city', and that everyone who can has left; the peasants no longer bring their produce as when they do the Bolsheviks requisition it and take it to Moscow; they take everything from 'unfortunate Ukraine', which is becoming increasingly poor. There are no trams or streetlights working; worse, there is no piped water, and those like her family who live a distance from the river are suffering terribly. People cannot get new clothes, or shoes; they go bare-footed with boards tied to their feet; lack of water means that there is much dirt and fever. The colonel said the 'atmosphere is so sad and overwhelming', and that he himself was maddened almost to suicide, but preferred to 'do even the lowest work here and eat only dry bread than to return there'. He travelled for a week in goods wagons, standing all the way, 'packed in like cattle' with ill, dirty, drunk and coarse people. She does not know if she can live knowing that her daughter is so much suffering there.

Marchand writes to Trevelyan on the back of Sonia Lewitska's letter: thanks him for everything he has done for Sonia: is very saddened by all that [Sonia has learned] . Had news this January from Mademoiselle [Angela] Lavelli. Asks how Trevelyan's family is. Has not seen [Francis] Birrell again.

Letter from E. M. Forster to Elizabeth Trevelyan

West Hackhurst, Abinger Hammer, Dorking. - Tried to ring up, but the telephone was out of order. Sorry to hear Bessie's news, especially as he was hoping to see her more often. Asks where she is going: he and Goldie [Dickinson] used to like Lyme Regis; Sidmouth has a new public garden laid out by Dartington Hall; he likes Eastbourne the best of the nearer resorts. Asks if she sent a letter to Gerald Heard at the Buckinghams: B. [Bob] is intrigued. Is enjoying Roger's book [Roger Fry's translations of Mallarme?].

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Chelsea. - Originally enclosing an account for housekeeping expenses: Trevelyan should take off the rent if he did in fact pay up to Lady Day. Explains how he has reckoned coal and wine. Had a good time on the river: Jack [McTaggart] 'delighted with his own absurdities and limitations'. Is going to Heathfield [Heathfield Park, home of William Cleverly Alexander?] again to paint.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

c/o R. W. Reynolds, 2 Hare Court, Temple, E.C. - Returns Trevelyan's poems; he has been unable to write a 'proper criticism', though he makes a few comments about the "Orpheus", which he very much likes, and the "Elegiacs", where there are some lines which give the same feeling as Poynters and Alma Tadenas - 'sham classical pictures'. Will reread the "Epimetheus" then send it on. Fry and his wife are going to try and get the Berners Street flat; Trevelyan must say if it doesn't suit him. They think he will be able to have both a bed room and sitting room. The initials are getting on very well.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivyholt, Dorking. - Is glad Trevelyan is back: will be working on the Colchester lecture until the 18th so invites him to visit then. The Albert Hall ones are finished and went well. He and Helen have not yet found Trevelyan a house, though the one they looked at [see 4/20] is still free; the wine has not arrived yet. Asks how Trevelyan's play "Cecilia" ["Cecilia Gonzaga"] is getting on. Helen and Goldie [Dickinson] are 'offensively & increasingly Daily Telegraphic together'.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivyholt. - Apologises for the delay in writing: Helen wanted to address a poem to Trevelyan about his flowers though Fry has warned her Melodie Dolmetsch [sic: Elodie, Arnold Dolmetsch's second wife] had no success that way. Thinks they will not visit till the end of the month. Is reading Balzac. His portrait of the 'O.B.' [Oscar Browning] got very like but he has made him 'a little sanctimonious': thinks he will be able to put this right, but doubts whether he is good at likeness or character. The proofs [of his book on Giovanni Bellini] have gone; mocks himself for his Gallicisms. Offers to talk to White regarding the disagreement over Trevelyan's taking a lease on a house: thinks it would be best to insist the lease is terminable in case of building. Doodle of Pegasus. A line in Helen Fry's hand should introduce a poem, but nothing follows: incomplete letter?

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivy Holt, Dorking. - Is writing to Trevelyan instead of working on his lectures on the Byzantines. Has just read [Stephen] Philips "P&F" ["Paolo and Francesca"] and shares Trevelyan's conclusions: it is very English and there is no real poetry in it. Trevelyan, Binyon and Moore are far superior, but it is Philips whom the critics praise. Has had an irritating letter from Mrs Grandmont. Yes, Moretto was a Brescian. Describes the Frys' journey back from Italy. Has been to Westcott and thinks the house will do very well: will get to work with the friezes soon. Helen says they will be delighted to have Amica [Elizabeth van der Hoeven] any time in February; hopes he will have some time free from lecturing to show her around Dorking. His arch at the New English [Art Club] looks 'abominable'. Hopes Trevelyan and Berenson will sort things out. Sends love to Ravello.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Leeds. - Definitely thinks that [Johnson] is acting unfairly over the publication of the book [Trevelyan's "Polyphemus and Other Poems", with illustrations by Roger Fry]. Will go and see him on his return; meanwhile Trevelyan could have the contract seen by the Authors' Society. Glasgow very full [for the Glasgow International Exhibition] - Fry ended up sleeping at a 'coffee room' - but extremely interesting: the Municipal Gallery [Kelvingrove] is fine; Fry does not believe it's a Giorgione. Also saw Newbattle [Abbey] though due to a storm he could only see the Piero di Cosimo ["Vulcan and Aeolus"] by gas light. Goes tomorrow to Liverpool, then to Gloucester to take B.B. [Berenson] to Sir H[ubert] Parry's house before returning to Dorking. Is sorry to have been unsympathetic about Trevelyan's 'Indian play' ["The Pearl-Tree"?].

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivy Holt, Dorking. - Went to see the Duchess [portrait of Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire, exhibited for sale at Agnews] and came to the same conclusion as Trevelyan [that it was not by Gainsborough: see "Athenaeum", Nov 23 1901, p.766]. Trevelyan is also quite right about the Chigi picture: has written to Binyon about it for the "Northern Chronicle". Is sorry 'it's been such a long & weary business for Bessie' and hopes it's over. Has begun on [the restoration of] Cook's altarpiece.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivy Holt, Dorking. - He and Helen much distressed to hear of Ida Cresswell's marital difficulties: her husband's affair seems insane, but she is brave and will pull through. Is leaning towards beech trees for Trevelyan's picture; will send some ideas of composition soon: thinks he has the pose of the figures. Has finished the second volume of the "Arabian Nights". Has finished Horne's and Mrs Gibson's pictures. The family is well though Julian is upset not to be able to dig outside because of the weather. They have met a 'very nice curate'. They go to Failand on the 27th and then on to Bruge. Saw Entiknapp [Enticknap].

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Dorking. - Asks why Trevelyan thought he might have died: did he see the death of Fry the bookmaker in an Italian paper? Was in fact not at all well yesterday. The children have had measles and the weather is dreadful: is determined not to spend another winter in Britain. They have taken the house at Hampstead [22 Willow Road] but the landlord is making difficulties about allowing alterations. The Piero di Cosimo scheme has fallen though.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Madeira Cottage, Lyme Regis. - Still more or less an invalid and can write while Helen is taking walks with Margery and the nurse. Helen is certainly in a better and more stable condition. The masque [for the opening of the new library at Somerville College, see 4/55] would be put on in June so he supposes Trevelyan will not be able to manage it, but it would be a pity. They want a mythological subject, the Triumph of Athene over Aphrodite and Juno, and Margery could send details. Asks where the Trevelyans are planning to go abroad. Stresses that he does like Bertie's article [Russell's "Free Man's Worship"].

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Does not know why Trevelyan has not received the enclosed [now missing: an invitation for Fry's exhibition at the Alpine Club?]: Trevelyan's father says he cannot come but has the dates wrong. Is fascinated by [Forster's] "The Longest Journey": reminds him more of Gorky than anything else. Logan [Pearsall Smith], however, 'kicks at it'. Is going to Perugia tomorrow for the Exhibition ["Mostra di antica arte umbra"]. Helen is much better. Does not think they will manage the Tovey concerts this time. A postscript notes that [William John?] Evelyn will not agree to the necessary improvements, so the Frys are still househunting.

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