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Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879) mother of Henry Sidgwick
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Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Thanks her for her letter. Thinks that his illness was due to something he ate. Declares that he enjoyed his visit to [London], and sent an account of the visit to [ ]. Reports that Mr Wheatley [his godfather] was very kind to the. Declares that he would like to see Miss Green [his former governess] if his mother can induce her to stay until he [and his brother William] come home. Refers to his mother's advice about his chess playing and assures her that he has not played more that five games 'since the beginning of the quarter...' Asks her to buy something for [his friend] Harry James out of his money. Explains how they were 'got into the 2nd class in German', and in relation to the play declares that they do not have to translate it themselves. Sends his love to all at home, 'including Elizabeth [Cooper]'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Reports that he sent off 'a solace' for her loneliness the previous day. Regrets that there is no chance of his seeing his aunt before he goes abroad. Hopes to be able to go and see her at the end of the Long [vacation]. Undertakes not to come home until he is forced, 'unless [he] can speak German properly'. Announces that he leaves Cambridge for London the following day, where he intends to meet some friends. Reports that his three weeks in Cambridge have not been spent quite as he could wish, but admits that they have been profitable. Hopes that she will like Plato, and tells her to attribute whatever she dislikes in the work to Whewell's mistranslations. Declares that he is glad to hear of her walking, and hopes that she won't overdo it. Thanks her for the ghost story [cf 101/146], and reports that he had had two at first hand by letter from a clergyman. Sends his love to William.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Thanks her for her letter. Reports on how his days are spent. Mentions William's visit to his family home. Is glad to hear his mother's good account of Minnie. Reports that he had a letter from Edward [Benson] some days previously; believes him not to be 'the right man in the right place', and thinks of him as 'thrown away' in his role as headmaster. In relation to a proposed stay at Sydenham declares himself to be 'tolerably indifferent', and states that he only wants to be able to see her and have the opportunity of quiet study. Thinks however that it might be a bore 'going and settling down for a short time [especially Xmas time] in a place' where they know nobody and have no introductions. Asks if her idea includes Edward and Minnie. Gives his own ideas in relation to how the time should be spent; 'paying visits vaguely and spending the rest of the time at Cambridge', and a week or so at Rugby. His idea, however, does not include William. Admits that he would enjoy being near London. Reports that Arthur is very well 'under his gymnastics' Announces that he is going on Tuesday to stay a night with a friend 'who has been among the D[ ] and [ ]'. Informs her that there is a little book about the latter by Lord Carnarvon. Asks if she has seen Dr [Joseph?] Wolff's life.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from Lucerne]:- Expresses his appreciation at receiving her letter. Is sorry to hear that she has still all her troubles [with moving house?] before her. Announces that he shall not be going home until the end of September due to health reasons. Does not want to shorten his German visit, as he shall be in the company of some old schoolfriends from Rugby. He, Graham Dakyns, Green and Rutson set off the following day on their tour. They intend to spend twelve days in the Bernese Oberland, and then Henry goes off to Dresden. Reports that he and Dakyns enjoyed their stay in Paris, despite the fact that Bury Dakyns, who joined them there to improve his French, 'was the most awful bore.' Reports that he fell ill and had to stay some days at Lucerne, and that Dakyns is pretty well. Remarks on the heat on the continent, which is more dead and stifling than than in England. Relates that they met the [William?] Boyds in Paris. Tells her mother to write to him during the next week. Sends his love to his aunt and cousins.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Announces that he will come down with Arthur on the 22nd [December]. States that William talks of coming to see him for two days 'on the Saturday'. Declares that his work is over, and that he is 'grinding' at Arabic and ethnology. His friends are 'all coming up from the different schools and it is very jolly'. Replies that she should not get him a ticket for the concert since he does not know if he shall come until the evening. Intends to bring his Arabic home with him. Reports that he has read Prehistoric Man [by Daniel Wilson?], but wasn't very impressed with it, and announces that there are 'some interesting scientific books expected by Lyall and Huxley, bearing on Primæval Man'. States that he looks forward to seeing Miss [Lucy?] Brown.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from Paris]:- Gives an account of a wedding he attended recently. Refers to Roden Noel, whom he met in the Louvre. Claims to be enjoying Paris very much, and likes the Tuileries and the Champs Elysées 'as much as ever.' Admits not to be attracted by France as much as by Germany, and gives his impressions of Paris and of the French people. Thinks that he will leave Paris 'on Monday week', but may stay a day or two longer. Reports that Arthur is to leave on Thursday. Hopes that William is recovered from his attack.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Thanks her for her letter and gift [a birthday present]. Declares that he has now passed 'what is said to be the dangerous age (as regards imprudent marriage)'. Considers staying in Cambridge during the Long Vacation, and says that the idea that it is 'insalubrious' in the summer is 'a complete delusion'. Reports that he went to London on Wednesday to a dinner party, and had a very serious attack of hay fever. Since 'a tolerably severe examination is near at hand, fears that he cannot come to see her as he had hoped to do that month. Reports that the living of Whitkirk has not yet been disposed of , but has heard that 'a late scholar of the college has just married on his curacy', and fears that his claims will be considered strong especially as he always went to morning chapel.' Expresses his surprise at the fact that Bob Mayor 'is going'. Asks if she has heard that Joseph Mayor is a candidate for the Professorship of political economy at Trinity College. Does not believe that he is the best man for the job, and states that he shall have to vote against him. Reports that he has just had three quarters of an hour 'at the Academy', and comments that he cannot conceive of 'anyone except a painter admiring the ghastly [Eve of] St Agnes', but states that the other two by Millais are 'wonderfully well-painted', though he wonders at the artist's choice of 'such trivial subjects.': 'There used to be some poetry in him: where is it gone to? His inspiration now seems about the level of Mrs Henry Wood's novels'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Asks his mother to forward a letter to Miss [Anne?] Brown, whose letter he has mislaid. Declares that he has fixed to come and spend September with her. Wishes to read, and thinks he shall spend August in Cambridge. Reports that he is getting on with Hebrew but very slowly. Predicts that he shall have read through I Samuel by the time he goes to Wellington College the following week. He intends to visit [C. H.?] Tawney after his exam there. Announces that he will pay his mother a morning call. Reports that the [Charles?] Bernards are living in Glamorganshire. Remarks that the Jews were a 'splendid people', but that the more he reads about them the more averse he becomes to the 'Bibliolatry of the day.' Observes that his is a disagreeable age in which to live; 'there are so many opinions held about everything and the advocates of each abuse their opponents so virulently that it quite frightens a modest man.'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Announces that he intends to come down the following week, leaving Cambridge on the Wednesday, probably spending a day with Roden Noel, and arriving home in or around Friday, or on Wednesday if the visit to Noel falls through. Does not feel that there is 'the least need that Arthur should try for a fellowship now'; he has discussed the matter with Lightfoot. Reports that he is still reading Hebrew, and has just finished Deuteronomy. Intends to continue reading when he goes home.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Discusses when he might come home, as he cannot decide on whether he should come a week hence or later. Tells her not to take him into account when filling the house, but asks her to let him know on Thursday or Friday whether his room is vacant or not. States that he will come on 24 December at the latest. States that although he is well read in Pneumatological Literature, he has not heard of the book mentioned by her, but undertakes to look for it in the University Library.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Anxious to receive news from her after her arrival at Fulford. Hopes that she will be able to stay as long as she wishes. Does not know when he shall get down to Rugby, or how long he shall stay, but states that his stay there 'will include Sunday the 5th'. Reports that he has seen Roche Dakyns, who was in Cambridge to take his M.A. degree. Reports that he went to Oxford the previous Saturday, saw William, and enjoyed himself very much. Remarks on the contrast between Oxford and Cambridge in respect of the more vibrant intellectual life in the former. Attributes this to the hot controversies that are always raging there.

States that he is inclined to agree with her about the new mastership at Rugby, and claims that the only doubt is what Arthur will do. Does not think that he will be sorry to have more time to read, and hopes that he will decide to stay in Cambridge. Reports that he has saved one thousand seven hundred pounds, and hopes to save four hundred a year as long as he stays in Cambridge. States that he dined at the Lodge the previous night 'and Lady Affleck [Everina Whewell or Maria Affleck?] enquired very kindly after Minnie'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from Göttingen]: - Reports that his days consist of reading Arabic and speaking German, and that on Sundays he goes for long walks with a Prussian student of Sanskrit; he is 'a most amiable-looking man, and you would take him for an Englishman'. Wishes that he could introduce her to Professor Ewald, as he is sure that she would like him. Believes that Ewald lengthened his lectures half an hour for Henry's sake, and reports that he has promised to give him private lessons during September.

Expects Graham Dakyns to come to spend a few days in the Harz at the end of the week. Announces that he intends to go to a 'Philologer-assembly', like the one he went to three years ago, in Hanover in just over a month's time. States that his health is good, and expects that he shall be quite well at the end of the Long Vacation. Discusses his diet and alcohol consumption: if anyone asks her whether he is turning into a 'beer-drinking German', she can truthfully say he has 'not drunk above three glasses' since arriving here. An English visitor to his host family told them that Henry's brother [William] was a 'distinguished wit... in Oxford'.

Mentions that Arthur had told him of his acceptance of the Rugby mastership, and admits that he has taken 'a prudent, perhaps a wise course'. Is glad that his mother's stay at Rugby will be so much pleasanter and hopes that it will turn out to be 'really not Rheumatic.' Suggests that if it is, she might move for a couple of months at the worst time of the year. Declares that he was much interested by her letter, and that he shall be glad of 'any news that is going.' Asks her to remind Arthur to enquire for him the exact day they go back at Cambridge. Hopes that she will succeed in getting a house. Asks why so many people are leaving, and if it has transpired what the [ ] said to Dr Temple's report. Regrets that she has no better account of his aunt Lace.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Reports that he had 'a most delightful visit to Dorsetshire'. Tells her that she may tell Arthur 'that the mesmerizing did not come to much', as '[Charles Kegan] Paul did not succeed in getting Cowell any further than [Henry] had done, i.e. into a partial trance.' Reports that he felt his patriotism revive 'among the chalk downs and rich autumnal parks.' Remarks that he was surprised to find that Mrs Paul, 'who has written two or three tolerably popular novels is a rather quiet shy silent person - though very thoughtful and sensible when she does speak.'

Encloses the stamps [not included] of which he spoke in previous letters, and agrees with her as to the best way of getting the others. Announces that he will study the [Robert?] Browning, and that he is setting to work, although he does not feel so much inclined for reading as he should after a holiday. Asks his mother to give his love to his aunt [Elizabeth Lace], and states that he is glad that she is going to see her. Asks when William is going to be at Rugby at Christmas, and asks if he may bring a friend or two some time in the holidays. Understands that Arthur will be 'Europeanizing.' Observes that Mr Martin seems much better, although he looks ten years older. Hopes to see William in the middle of term. States that he does not like the moral and intellectual atmosphere at Cambridge any better for having been at Göttingen, or at least its effects on him; says however that 'the great lesson' he has learned in Germany is 'the necessity and duty of steady work, and one can do that anywhere'.

Reports that he is reading all kinds of books. Asks if she gets books now from a club, and if so, recommends the article on Poland in Vacation Tourists [and Notes on Travel].

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Thanks her for writing. Sends his love to Mary. Reports that he is living up [in Cambridge] 'in much peace and prosperity now the undergraduates are gone down and [his] hayfever is kept at arm's length by a careful regimen.' Asks her when she intends to go abroad, and hopes that she will enjoy the trip. Contemplates staying in England during the long vacation, and intends to 'go North' in August to see everyone who wants to see him.

Reports that a friend of his [Edwin Charles Clark] got married the previous week, and that he wishes to find out something about his wife - Miss Kitson of Leeds - as they are going to be living in Cambridge. Reports that a book of travels by Lady Duff-Gordon has been published, and a friend of his who has had it to review has recommended it. Refers to another 'interesting book': 'Palgrave's journey across Arabia' [W. G. Palgrave's Personal Narrative of a Year's Journey through Central and Eastern Arabia (1862-1863)], and also to Miss Yonge's last novel. Of the latter, he claims that he got bored with it towards the end. Declares that Miss Oliphant's present story in Blackwood['s Magazine] 'sends [him] into fits'.

Asks his mother to tell Edward [Benson] that he was sorry he could not come to examine, and that the man who is going is a friend of his.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from Wellington College]:- Reports that he is 'revelling in idleness and hot weather and unbending [his] mind in female society'. Reports that he left Clifton the previous day. Declares that the work was 'so appallingly hard' that he had not time to call on anybody. Maintains that he enjoyed it nonetheless. Hopes to go to his uncle Robert's on the Thursday of the following week, then on to A[ ]cliffs, Biddlesden, Leeds, and 'a flying visit to Halifax.' Asks her opinion of Stone-Gappe. States that he must be in Cambridge again by the end of the month, as he has much reading to do. Announces that he will come to her when he wants to relax slightly. Knows that the atmosphere 'will be too industrious to allow [him] to do more.' Hopes that she won't be too anxious about William's improvement.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Writes to thank her for the news, which he says has given him heartfelt gratification [that his cousin Katie Lace is to be married in April, see 101/164]. Is amused by the apologetic tone she assumes, 'as if [he] did not believe in marrying on 300 a year'. Remarks that 'Katie will be a great loss to Stone Gappe'. Tells her to ensure that Arthur answers the following message. States that Hudson wrote to Arthur a few days before the latter left Dresden to ask him to bring home for him 'some articles of Virtue'. Asks whether he received the letter, and if so, 'why the Whewell did not he send the things by Parcel delivery Company. Announces that he is probably coming down at Easter for a day or two but cannot say when. Claims that he can get beds anywhere, however. Declares that [Thomas Jex-?] Blake would take him in if he has forgiven him for sending him to Göttingen, to which destination he [Henry] proposes to send another friend of his the following summer. Reports that there is another charming story in Cornhill for M[ ].

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Announces his intention of coming down 'about the middle of passion week', from Wellington College, but states that he cannot quite fix his movements, as he wants to be in Cambridge to inaugurate the new master [of Trinity]. Reports that there was relief at the appointment, as there was fear that it would be a non-resident. Declares that Thompson 'will make a very good sort of master, though not perhaps the best' as he is 'a little too lazy or dyspeptic'. Claims that they expect further changes in the College, 'as it is thought Mathison will take a living', but that they won't make Henry tutor.

Informs her that he shall not bring any friend with him as he prefers the domestic circle when at home, and will stay over Easter Sunday if his mother has room for him. Confirms that he is interested in the ' "grammar question" ', and strongly believes that the language should be taught to boys 'without making them learn by heart a syntax in Latin.' Looks forward to seeing his uncle Robert, but does not wish to talk about theological questions [with him]. He is willing to talk about 'any amount' of politics or philosophy, however. States that he has not forgotten about the poems, but cannot find the book. Undertakes to buy another one if he cannot find it, and send it to her. Expresses regret in relation to his mother's health, and hopes to see 'them in a week or so.' Refers to the fact that Edward [Benson] is not well, and that 'he seems a good deal worried about new masters'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Does not think that he shall come to Rugby before the end of 'the half.' Believes that his hay fever will not leave him before the end of July, and does not think that he will go anywhere until it clears up. Intends to stay in Cambridge and study, and if unwell, to 'fly off to the seaside.' Says that he studies best in vacation time, not simply because there is more time, but also because he has a 'restive imagination' which he cannot 'harness' when his mind is 'filled with all manner of College and University matters'.

Wishes to visit his schoolmaster friends at Eton, Harrow, and so on, towards the end of July. Asks if she has heard lately about Tryphosa [Lace, his cousin]. Does not quite understand what she will do by going to see her. Asks how his uncle [Francis] feels about it. Reports that the Donisthorpes are there [in Cambridge], but claims that he has been so busy that he has hardly been able to see anything of them. Remarks that he thinks 'the youth' [Wentworth] is clever.

Can tell Mrs Gretton amuses his mother, and remarks that he likes people who are unlike other people in their ways. Agrees with his mother about 'the '"foreignness" of [Mrs Gretton's] manière d'être' but observes that 'it is not only in the "sunny south" one finds that expansiveness', adding that the Germans have a good deal of it; sometimes thinks it is the 'more natural state' than English reserve, but says that 'when it is affected it is very odious'. Declares that he likes [Charles Kegan?] Paul very much. States that he finds that he has lost his paper about the Arundel Portfolios.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

States that he has been at Trinity College about a week, trying to write an article, but claims that he has been ill and shall probably be delayed. Does not think that solitary life agrees with his constitution, but clings to it because he believes that it helps him to concentrate his mind. Declares that he enjoyed his holiday very much, 'particularly the three weeks at the Lake [with G. O. Trevelyan and Edward Young].' Remarks that although he was happy in Dorsetshire, 'it was very melancholy being with poor Cowell', who is quite ill.

Reminds his mother of her invitation to [Charles Kegan] Paul to come to Rugby, and announces that he has asked him to come the following Easter. Does not know whether he will bring Mrs Paul or not. Asks her to send a volume of Fichte, and any books with library marks on them. Hopes to come to visit her on 3 October for a week. Explains that that is the day the Union Library opens and he wants to get some books 'before the country clergy have gone off with them all. Announces that it is thought that J. B. Mayor will be the new Professor of Moral Philosophy.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Asks her to send 'the Portfolio'; notes that he always leaves something behind. Sends Bishop Westcott's book [not included], which he hopes she will like. States that he had already decided not to go in for the Professorship of Moral Philosophy when he learnt that F. D. Maurice was a candidate. Believes that the latter has the best chance. Predicts that he will be 'a stimulating lecturer', and hopes that he will be a very good appointment, as Cambridge is currently 'in some need of stimulus'; is 'rather sorry' for his friend Venn, who is 'thoroughly of the new school' of which Dr Lightfoot is the most distinguished representation.

Reports that he transmitted his mother's books to Mrs Peile in person, and that the Peiles were in Göttingen 'during the excitement of the change of dynasty in September.' Also reports that they say that all the professional element of society 'rejoiced strongly in the transference', but that the householding element was not very happy about having to entertain a number of Prussian soldiers; the chief discontent being in Hanover. Declares that their hall [at Trinity College] is 'resplendent', and the 'undergraduates call it the "Alhambra"'; the college have introduced 'the disgraceful luxury of chairs' there. Regrets to hear about William, and hopes that he will come over [to Cambridge] soon.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Proposes to come to visit her on 29 or 31 December, and to stay until 8 or 9 January. Asks if this suits her, and to answer him by return of post. Asks when Arthur is going. Reports that his motion [proposing the election of a Praelector for the direction of Physical Science studies and other new subjects] was lost at the College meeting. Declares that he is now reading principally philosophy, and that he has much to read. Asks her to tell him about Mary [Minnie] and Edward when she writes. Reports that there are considerable changes going on [at Trinity College], which, he claims, will affect him somewhat, but that he has 'now got so used to being unsettled' that he works 'just as well'. Asks if she wrote to Mrs Clough [see 101/172/1-2).

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Informs her that he has been trying to procure for her a novel by Mrs Paul, but has lost his copy and cannot find a copy in the University Library. Promises to get one for her 'some way or other.' Is glad that she is enjoying herself and is amused to hear of William's decorations. Fears that he will not be able to go to Oxford that term, but hopes to see William at the end of it. Claims not to have inclination to taking much trouble with his temporary accommodation. Remarks that 'a bachelor making himself comfortable seems...an incongruous thing.' Observes that fellows of colleges have a tendency to become lazy and luxurious, and states that he does not intend to be the latter. Remarks that William 'is not lazy or luxurious'. Apologises for boring her with a 'dull and egotistical discourse'.

Declares that he enjoyed his visit to London; 'every moment was filled up with something delightful.' Remarks that 'the happiness of life does depend on intellectual sympathy' to him, and that when he gets 'a good deal of it at once', such as during a London holiday, 'one seems to live a good deal in the time'; notes that if one lived among the same people one would get less of it.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Announced that he has decided to come to Rugby the week after the following week, instead of the following Thursday, as he had originally intended. States that he wishes to dine with his editor at Harrow on the following Saturday and see his friends there. Reports that Montagu Butler has been seriously ill, but is getting better. Is very sorry to hear about Mary, and asks for a better account to be sent as soon as she can. Also regrets to read her report of William, and states that he has no time to go and see him.

Regrets that he is not able to work as hard as he should like. Declares that he should have given himself a longer complete holiday during that long vacation. Reports on the work he has done. Thought that he 'should have got further towards explaining Spiritualism, one way or another'; however, 'it gives life an additional interest having a problem of such magnitude still to solve'. Asks his mother's opinion on the Bishop's address, and remarks that he thought it was 'exceedingly well composed on the whole'. Professes to be becoming more interested in ecclesiastical matters from reading English history. Sends his love to Mary and Edward.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Explains that his silence is due to his having 'a great number of letters to write of a semi-political character.' Is glad to hear her favourable account of his uncle [John Crofts?]. Asks her to send his greetings to everyone. Discusses Miss [Matilda?] Tootal's questions; states that the association [the board formed by Oxford and Cambridge fellows for the examination of governesses and schoolmistresses] is only voluntary and therefore may be dissolved at any moment with more ease than if it was a chartered body. Claims however that when its work is done the distinction will not be very important, and that if the scheme fails to obtain the support of those for whom it is intended, they [Sidgwick and others] 'can dissolve without the slightest trouble and with the sense of having done [their] part towards the improvement of female education.' Explains the consequences of one's name appearing on the list of the association, i.e., that that person takes some responsibility for the arrangement of the scheme of examination and for the appointment of examiners. Refers to 'the "prestige" of a university diploma', what it represents, and what theirs will represent.

States that the scheme of the University of London 'is as yet undetermined', but that if it proves to be successful 'then there will be two schemes of examination for women, just as there are now Oxford middleclass examinations and Cambridge ditto.' Warns that if they do not get enough candidates the association will dissolve. Hopes that, by their example, they will encourage 'the Universities' to follow the same line, and that they may arouse the interest of a large number of the influential members of both Universities in the cause of the higher education of women. They intend to 'meet an existing need and to continue [their] operations as long as [they] get a sufficient number of candidates, unless superseded by corporate action on the part of either Cambridge or Oxford.' Hopes to come to visit his mother for Passion Week, and asks if he may invite Seeley to come.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Regrets to hear of the unfavourable circumstances under which she made her visit to London [see Mary Sidgwick's letter, ADD.MS.c/101/179]. Reports that he has made himself rather ill 'by knocking about to Oxford and London from 13th to 15th' and has been keeping very quiet in Cambridge ever since. Intends to go to London for a few days before he goes to Rugby.

Reports that he just saw the Royal Academy, referring to the work of Leighton, Millais and Brett, and declaring it on the whole to be a bad exhibition. Announces that his friend Charles Bernard and his wife are now in England, and asks his mother if she would like him to ask him 'to run down to Rugby' while Henry is there and stay for a day or so. Reports that he saw William in Oxford on 13 June, and that he seemed very well. Indicates that they may meet in Switzerland. States that he is working now, and is very well. Tells her to keep the MSS as long as she likes; does not know if they will interest her, though he finds them interesting 'as all details of one's own mental life are. One grows old in Cambridge very fast...' Comments on the fact that [Jex]-Blake has been elected principle of Cheltenham [College]. Remarks that he will prosper, and states that he does not feel quite sure that Farrar would, although he would have felt more interested in trying the experiment with Farrar.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Claims that he has thought a good deal about what she proposed about the Hortons [see ADD.MS.c/101/180-181]. Discusses the education of the son [Fred] and the possibility of his getting a scholarship to Winchester, and of going on the University education. Believes that if he is 'only ordinarily sharp', that he should probably not go to University, and that the Sidgwicks should help the family 'in some more pressing need.' Also discusses the little girl [Rose]'s future, and agrees with his mother in relation to not taking her away from home. Asks how she liked Paracelsus [by Browning], which he thinks 'has splendid stuff', despite being 'much too difficult and obscure'. Reports that Noel has published a volume of poems, which have been reviewed in the Pall Mall Gazette. Asks after Arthur. Reports that Martineau has written 'a fine pamphlet' for the Free Christian Union.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Reports that the authorities at Trinity College have offered him the post of 'Lecturer on Moral Sciences' at £200 a year, on the understanding that he repudiate all dogmatic obligations. Intends to resign his fellowship. Reports that he has had a conversation with [Bishop] Lightfoot about his situation, and announces that he has been 'partly determined by his advice not to secede from the Church of England.' Discusses his position with regard to his beliefs, including his attitude towards the Apostles' Creed. Asks her to show the letter to Arthur. Admits to be very glad to be 'free from the anxiety of weighing pros and cons.' Mentions that his income will be seriously reduced, but that he shall have much more than enough to live on.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Reports that he went 'up and down brooks, in Derbyshire and Yorkshire'; doesn't know whether he will be going anywhere that day. Asks her to pay for the Pall Mall Gazette at Tait's, as he had ordered it for a week, and it has been sent it for more.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

States that 'the watch spoken of by the prophet would be highly acceptable', but that his mother 'has other ideas' [for a wedding present]. Supposes that Myers is coming to Cambridge, and informs him of his movements over the next week or so. Reports that they have not yet got over the shock of Lord Salisbury's speech [introducing a Bill to set up a commission to reorganise the colleges and university of Oxford along lines favoured by Sidgwick and other Cambridge Liberals], and suggests that the latter does not know what academic conservatism is, or does not care; perhaps 'Oxford Conservatives are unlike Cambridge ones.' Has 'nothing to do but suppress [his] exultation and see what turns up'. Announces that Arthur Balfour 'is expected daily now'. Reports that Nora is staying that night with the Marquis [of Salisbury], but Sidgwick is afraid that 'he won't talk to her about University Reform'. Hopes that Myers' brother [Arthur?] 'is still convalescing'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Writes to wish her a happy birthday. Explains that he is very busy. Regrets that she has not yet seen their home in Cambridge, and declares that he hopes that when spring come again she will 'see the trees growing leafy in Magdalene Gardens, from [their] windows'. Reports that Arthur has just been to Cambridge, and that he is looking well and is in good spirits. Remarks that Rugby 'seems to have a very serene existence on the whole'. Was very shocked to hear of [the death of] Wyndham, and reports that L[ankester] spoke a little with Nora about it.

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