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Salter Papers

  • SALT
  • Fonds
  • 1901–71

The papers concern psychical research, in particular the concept of cross-correspondence in the writings of automatic writers, and consist of automatic scripts by Margaret and Helen Verrall (later Helen Salter), with notes and correspondence relating to these and the writings of other automatists active during the early decades of the twentieth century, including those of Alice Fleming ("Mrs Holland") and Winifred Coombe Tennant ("Mrs Willett"). In addition, there are 32 privately printed volumes, including various scripts edited by the Verralls, J. G. Piddington, Alice Johnson, and G. W. Balfour; Piddington's nine-volume analysis 'Notes and Excursuses' and W. H. Salter's 'Introduction to the Study of Scripts'.

Salter, William Henry (1880–1969), lawyer and psychical researcher

Pethick-Lawrence Papers

  • PETH
  • Fonds
  • 1825–1970

This collection contains the surviving contents of the Pethick-Lawrences’ correspondence files, including letters from, and copies of letters to, a wide range of politicians and public figures; papers relating to the Lawrence family and the early life of F. W. Lawrence; articles and scripts of talks by Lord Pethick-Lawrence; correspondence between the Pethick-Lawrences themselves; papers of Lady Constance Lytton; papers relating to the separation of the Pethick-Lawrences from the Women’s Social and Political Union; and papers relating to prison conditions. The collection contains particularly notable material on the subjects of Indian independence, the suffrage movement, and other aspects of social reform.

Lawrence, Frederick William Pethick- (1871-1961), 1st Baron Pethick-Lawrence, politician

Papers of William Whewell

  • WHWL*
  • Fonds
  • [16th]-19th cent.

The papers consist of correspondence, diaries, subject files, writings, other Whewell papers, family papers, and later papers of others. The family papers include those originally gathered by Whewell's first wife Cordelia (née Marshall) and his second wife Lady Affleck (née Ellis). The papers of Lady Affleck's brother and Whewell's friend Robert Leslie Ellis now form a subset of this collection.

Whewell, William (1794-1866), college head and writer on the history and philosophy of science

Papers of Walter Ullmann

  • ULLM
  • Fonds
  • 20th c

The papers consist of writings, correspondence, lecture notes, printed material, personal papers, photographs, and audiovisual material relating to Walter Ullmann's life and work.

Ullmann, Walter (1910–1983), historian

Papers of W. K. Clifford

  • CLIF
  • Fonds
  • 1860s–1970s

The collection includes letters written by Clifford to friends and relatives, notebooks kept by him, and various items relating to his lectures and writings, including manuscript drafts, proofs, printed syllabuses, and pamphlets. There are also some photographs. The items added after Clifford’s death include correspondence about him, obituaries, reviews of posthumous publications, and papers relating to the public testimonial organised in his name.

Clifford, William Kingdon (1845-1879), mathematician and philosopher of science

Papers of the Monk and Sanford families

  • MONK
  • Fonds
  • 1785–1970

This catalogue records correspondence and papers of James Henry Monk, 1808-55; Jane Smart Monk, 1813-54; Charles James Monk, 1835-1900; Jane Emily Monk, 1845-1918; Penelope Anna Monk, [1901]; James Henry Monk jun, c1882-1940; Constance Sanford, 1908-10; Julia Monk jun, 1875-1951; Ada Monk, 1881-1922; Mrs Spencer Percival, 1834-75; Mrs Edward Sanford, [20th cent]; Stephen Sanford, post 1918-1966; Olga Sanford, [20th cent]; Violet Sanford, 1974; Alice Berrington, 1940s; J D Berrington, 1938-45; Henry Sanford, 1941-70; Judith Wilberforce, 1930-[31].

Sandford family

Papers of the Babington family of Rothley Temple

  • BABN
  • Fonds
  • 1788-1921

This archive includes papers (mostly correspondence) of the following. Charles Roos Babington, 1818-1826; George Gisborne Babington, 1809-1837; Jean Babington, 1802-1840; Joseph Babington 1822-1826; Matthew Babington, 1821-1833; Thomas Babington, 1788-1837; Thomas Gisborne Babington, 1809-1834; Colin Macaulay, 1811-1835; Zachary Macaulay, 1791-1835; Sir James Parker, 1818-1857; Margaret Parker, 1820-1843; Mary Lady Parker, 1806-1857; Susan Darroch 1820-1839; Lydia Rose 1803-1844 and Mary Ellen Rose, 1836-1921.

Correspondents include Thomas Babington Macaulay, Zachary Macaulay and Sir James Parker. The correspondence between Zachary Macaulay and Thomas Babington contains many references to the anti-slavery campaign and its champions including William Wilberforce.

Babington family of Rothley Temple

Papers of Sir Walter Lamb (W. R. M. Lamb)

  • LAMB
  • Fonds
  • 1882–1961

Diaries 1867-1960 (mostly relating to Royal Academy business), correspondence

Lamb, Sir Walter Rangeley Maitland (1882–1961), knight, classicist and Secretary of the Royal Academy of Arts

Papers of Sir Walter Greg (W. W. Greg)

  • GREG
  • Fonds
  • 1893–1958

This collection includes correspondence—mainly letters to Greg from fellow-bibliographers and literary scholars—notes, photographs of books and manuscripts, cuttings, a few small printed items, and the manuscript of part of Some Aspects of London Publishing.

Greg, Sir Walter Wilson (1875-1959), knight, literary scholar and bibliographer

Papers of Sir Richard Claverhouse Jebb

  • JEBB
  • Fonds
  • 1874–1905

The archive comprises Jebb's 'Servanda': scrapbooks of material 'to be kept'. Press clippings, correspondence, printed parliamentary and academic material, ephemera and so on are pasted in to numbered pages, sometimes with MS annotations by Jebb; loose material, such as correspondence, is interleaved. The first volumes are disbound and have been weeded, with remaining pages preserved in paper wrappings within 'transfer cases'.

Transfer case 1 contains papers from 'Servanda' scrapbooks I (Jul 1876-Nov 1879, with loose letter from 1874), II (Jan 1880–Nov 1881) and III (Nov 1881-Apr 1883); separate gatherings in paper covers also seem to have come from this volume: Nov 1881, ‘Mahuffy v R.C.J. (scant contents)’, ‘R.C.J.’s Life of Bentley’, 1882; ‘Controversy with Sayce, 1881-1882’; Transfer case 2 contains papers from 'Servanda' scrapbooks IV (Nov 1883-Jun 1884) and V; Transfer case 3 contains much loose material and scrapbook pages, presumably from 'Servanda' VI and VII, as well as papers from 'Servanda' VIII (1889).

The intact 'Servanda' volumes cover the following dates: IX, Mar 1890-Oct 1891; X, Oct 1891-Oct 1893; XI, Oct 1893-Aug 1894; XIA, 1894-Jun 1896; XII, Sept 1894-Nov 1896; XIII, Nov 1896-Jul 1898; XIV, Jul 1898-Jul 1899; XV, Jul 1899-May 1900; XVI, Jun 1900-Mar 1902; XVII, Mar 1902-Jul 1903.

There are also two bound volumes both labelled 'Newspaper Cuttings', one containing similar material to that contained in the 'Servanda' scrapbooks from 1903-1905, the other containing press cuttings relating to Jebb's death, letters regarding this mainly to Lady Jebb, material relating to Jebb's funeral service, and reviews of his edition of Bacchylides (1905-1906).

Jebb, Sir Richard Claverhouse (1841–1905), knight, Greek scholar

Papers of Sir Peter Shaffer

  • SHAF
  • Fonds
  • 1940-2016

The papers consist of correspondence, writings, diaries, photographs, and printed material which document the life and work of playwright Sir Peter Levin Shaffer.

Shaffer, Sir Peter Levin (1926–2016), knight, playwright

Papers of Sir Joseph Thomson (J. J. Thomson), Part II

  • THMJ II
  • Fonds
  • 1836–1958

The material in this collection covers the period 1836-1958. It is presented in eight sections.

Section A, Biographical, covers the period 1874-1958. The material includes biographical profiles, certificates, press cuttings, photographs and invitations. Correspondence and papers used by Lord Rayleigh in the preparation of his biography of Thomson The Life of Sir J. J. Thomson O.M. sometime master of Trinity College, Cambridge (Cambridge, 1942) can be found at A/23-A31. A/110-A/143 include press cuttings on Thomson's lectures and reviews of his publications. Certificates are at A/72-A/103

Section B, Family and personal, is the largest in the collection and spans the period 1836-1952. The bulk of the material consists of family and personal correspondence sent to members of the Thomson and Paget families between 1872 and 1952. This correspondence has been arranged by recipient, thus for example, letters from Thomson to his wife are to be found in Lady Thomson's correspondence at B/45-B/53 rather than in that of Thomson himself (B/1-B/6). There is significant correspondence sent to Thomson, 1873-1940, but the largest component of the section, at B/45-B/639, is correspondence and papers of Lady Thomson covering the period 1872-1950. This includes family and personal correspondence received by Lady Thomson, notebooks and diaries, and correspondence from societies and organisations. At B/640-B/679 is correspondence received by other family members including G.P. Thomson, J.P. Thomson, F.V. Thomson and G.E. Paget. The section also includes photographs, household accounts and a little miscellaneous material.

Section C, Trinity College, Cambridge, consists chiefly of incoming correspondence sent to Thomson as Master of Trinity College, Cambridge and covers the period 1918-1944. The bulk relates to College matters including students, Fellows, meetings etc., but there is also business and personal correspondence including letters of congratulations on Thomson's installation as Master in 1918. The correspondence includes letters from Cambridge colleagues such as E. Rutherford, R.T. Glazebrook, J.G. Frazer and A. Schuster. The section also includes invitations to social occasions received by the Thomsons and replies to invitations to social events hosted by the Thomsons between 1918 and 1938. There are also a small number of Trinity College entrance examination papers and scripts.

Section D, Research, is very slight. It consists of a few research notes and photographs for the period 1893 to 1934.

Section E, Societies and organisations, is also slight. It has been arranged in alphabetical order and covers the period 1886-1930. The most significant material is that at E/10-E/28: reports and minutes of the Committee on Science in the Educational System of Great Britain, which Thomson chaired between 1902 and 1920. There is also a small amount of Royal Society material.

Section F, Lectures, speeches and publications, covers the period 1876-1938. There is material on a number of Thomson's public lectures and speeches including lectures given at the British Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting in Winnipeg, Canada, 1909. A notebook at F/27 has typescript notes on lectures delivered at Cambridge by Thomson. Publications material includes manuscript drafts of the first edition of Conduction of Electricity through Gases (Cambridge 1903) and Rays of Positive Electricity (London 1913). Press cuttings on Thomson's lectures and publications can be found at A/110-A/143.

Section G, Visits and conferences, is not extensive. The material has been arranged in chronological order 1896-1938. It includes brief correspondence on the British Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting, 1909.

Section H, Correspondence, is presented in two sequences, scientific and general. The scientific sequence includes letters from G.G. Stokes, Lord Rayleigh (4th Baron) and Lord Kelvin. The general sequence is arranged in chronological order covering the period 1888-1938. A file of 'Letters to JJ from distinguished people and others' is at H/32-H/35, which includes correspondence from Arthur Balfour, Stanley Baldwin and Austen Chamberlain.

Thomson, Sir Joseph John (1856-1940), knight, physicist

Papers of Sir Joseph Thomson (J. J. Thomson), Part I

  • THMJ I
  • Fonds
  • 1876-1970

The archive contains little scientific material as by far the greater part of Thomson's scientific papers are deposited in Cambridge University Library. Material is arranged as follows:
Section A - Personal material and correspondence;
Section B - Notes and drafts for publication;
Section C - Scientific correspondence;
Section D - Accounts and biographies of Thomson;
Section E - Published works.

Thomson, Sir Joseph John (1856-1940), knight, physicist

Papers of Sir James Jeans

  • JEAN
  • Fonds
  • [20th c.]

Jeans, Sir James Hopwood (1877-1946) knight, mathematician and astronomer

Papers of Sir James Frazer

  • FRAZ
  • Fonds
  • 1745-1941

The papers consist of correspondence, writings, notebooks, diaries, music manuscripts, printed material, and photographs which document the life and work of social anthropologist and classical scholar Sir James George Frazer, and to a lesser extent that of his wife, the writer and translator Lilly Frazer (known after June 1914 as Lady Frazer), who acted as his manager and press agent. The collection spans the years 1872-1941, but the bulk of the material dates from the 1920s and 1930s.

Research strengths include Frazer’s writings in the 1920s and 1930s, social anthropology, folklore, classical scholarship, British and French publishing history, and Trinity College academic and social life. The bulk of the collection dates from the last two decades of his life, and therefore contains material from a time well after his reputation was established. While there are letters from people with anthropological data, the collection does not include the vast amount of data and answers to his anthropological questionnaires that he presumably possessed when compiling the first edition of 'The Golden Bough'. Very often letters with anthropological data are in the form of fan letters, whose writers wish to correct or add to information in one of his books.

The papers are arranged in small and repeated groupings, with alphabetical runs of letters followed by writings and printed material, returning to more alphabetical runs of letters featuring many of the same correspondents as the previous runs, more writings, and research materials, and on. The searching abilities of the database will be useful to find all materials by a person or on a subject.

The correspondence is almost entirely incoming, with just 29 original letters from James Frazer (in FRAZ/1) and 15 typed copies of his letters (in FRAZ/1-4, 16, 25 and 29) and twelve original letters, a draft and four typed copies by Lilly Frazer (in FRAZ/1, 3, 17, 31 and 33) in a collection of over 2300 letters evenly divided between the two. In addition to runs of alphabetically arranged letters, there are also groups of letters on specific topics featuring many of the same correspondents. Letters may also be found with writings and research notes elsewhere in the collection.

The correspondence spans the years 1872-1941, however, the earliest dated letter to or from James or Lilly is dated January 1888. There are a limited number of letters from this early period. Many letters addressed to Lilly concern business related to James’ works, and some letters written in the late 1930s are addressed to her to be read aloud to him due to his increasing blindness.

Anthropologists appearing in the collection include L. C. G. Clarke, Edward Clodd, A. C. Haddon, J. H. Hutton, Lucien Lévy-Bruhl, Bronisław Malinowski, R. R. Marett, John Roscoe, and Sir Grafton Elliot Smith. There are only three letters from Sir Walter Baldwin Spencer, but 16 from his daughter Dorothy Young. Classical scholars in the collection include A. B. Cook, F. M. Cornford, A. E. Housman, J. P. Postgate, Sir William Ridgeway, and H. J. Rose. Principal editors and publishers in the collection include James Loeb, George Macmillan, T. E. Page, and W. H. D. Rouse. Other principal correspondents are David Lindsay, the Earl of Crawford and Balcarres; and Sir Joseph Thomson and his wife Rose Thomson. Many of Lilly's correspondents write to her in her native French. Her principal correspondents include François Ceccaldi (many of them written from his native Corsica), Noémi Psichari, the daughter of Ernest Renan; translator Pierre Sayn, and James’ friend W. J. Lewis.

Writings by Sir James Frazer comprise 21 boxes, with additional writings to be found in the notebooks in FRAZ/35. The work represented by the most amount of material in the collection is Frazer’s edition of Ovid’s 'Fasti', published by Macmillan in 1929, and by Loeb in 1931. The papers do not include notes for the preparation of the original 'Golden Bough' nor do they include the manuscript. There are, however, three notebooks containing notes relating to the second and third editions (FRAZ/35/9-11). Frazer’s own copies of the different editions of 'The Golden Bough' are housed separately in the printed books Adversaria collection and carry numerous annotations.

Printed material consists of press cuttings, pamphlets, offprints, and small books. An album of cuttings of reviews of the first edition of 'The Golden Bough' may be found at FRAZ/22/4. Ten small books and pamphlets have also been catalogued into the Trinity Library printed materials catalogue but remain housed with the papers. The music manuscripts are housed in FRAZ/8 and consist of scores composed by Stuart Young setting Sir James’ poems to music. Margaret Rose’s operetta libretto based on Lady Frazer’s story 'The Singing Wood' was similarly set to music (the libretto at FRAZ/32/266 and the score FRAZ/8/1/5).

The travel diaries and many of the notebooks were previously housed on Trinity College Library shelves with printed books and have been reunited with the collection, along with 13 volumes and a small number of loose notes returned from the Haddon Library of Archaeology and Anthropology. The photographs in the collection include 16 photographic prints of sites in Greece possibly taken by Sidney George Owen, two of them dated June 1906 (FRAZ/21/67-82).

Frazer, Sir James George (1854-1941), knight, social anthropologist and classical scholar

Papers of Sir James Butler (J. R. M. Butler)

  • BUTJ
  • Fonds
  • 1794–1975

Personal correspondence 1894-1974, papers concerning Trinity College and Cambridge University 1907-66, academical notes 1920-50, lectures 1921-62, publications 1914-64, papers relating to The Directorate of Military Operations 1918-19, The League of Nations 1918-32, J R M Butler's political life 1918-24, Civil Affairs Staff Centre 1943-44, Papers of George Butler 1794-1850, papers of Henry Montagu Butler 1846-1918, papers of Gordon Kerr Montagu Butler 1910-16, papers of Nevile Montagu Butler 1910-67

Butler, Sir James Ramsay Montagu (1889–1975), knight, historian

Papers of Sir Henry Babington Smith

  • SMIH
  • Fonds
  • 1833-1942

The archive contains school and University papers 1871-1905, diaries 1881-94, Education Department and Treasury papers 1883-93. Papers relating to India 1891-1904, the Natal finance 1899-1900, the Ottoman public debt 1893-09, the General Post office 1903-09, the National Bank of Turkey 1903-17, the Royal Commission on the Civil Service 1912-15, wartime finance and trade 1915-21, the Indian Exchange and Currency Committee 1914-20 and the Railways Amalgamation Tribunal 1921-23. Correspondence 1873-1923. Papers of Lady Elisabeth Mary Babington Smith 1894-1935. Bruce family correspondence 1861-1938.

Smith, Sir Henry Babington (1863–1923), knight, civil servant and financier

Papers of Sir George Thomson (G. P. Thomson)

  • THMG
  • Fonds
  • 1905–1977

The material includes notebooks, manuscript notes and drafts, drafts for lectures and papers (many unpublished or additional to those listed in the Bibliography compiled for the Royal Society Memoir of Thomson), photographs and slides of experimental results, and correspondence.

Of considerable interest are the drafts and text of Thomson's autobiography covering his career to 1966; this document, which he had written primarily for his family, is included at A.2 - A.14 and has, with permission, been drawn upon in compiling some of the catalogue entries. It is an important source of information for some of the `gaps' in the surviving manuscripts, particularly for such matters as Thomson's activities in the Second World War (other than the MAUD Committee), his many foreign visits and his public commitments. In his introduction to the autobiography, Thomson mentions his inability to write adequately of his wife Kathleen, and of his hope to compile a selection of her letters to him; bound copies of the autobiography, and of the letters, have been made available by Mr. D.P. Thomson and appear at A.14, A.14A respectively.

Thomson's scientific research on electron diffraction is well documented by notebooks, lectures and slides; his contribution to thermonuclear research, on which he was able to publish very little because of the demands of security, survives mainly in the form of manuscript notes and drafts (see Section E). Unfortunately, it is clear that much has been lost of the early correspondence on electron diffraction.

Thomson's service to the Royal Society, The Institute of Physics, the British Association and many other learned societies, is also very scantily documented.

Thomson's own distinguished contribution to scientific knowledge, together with his admiration for his father and early acquaintance with eminent men of science, made him always aware of the history of science and its practitioners. He wrote and lectured widely on these subjects, often for anniversary celebrations of various kinds, and also contributed many obituary tributes for individual scientists, many of them his personal friends. He frequently assembled information and recollections additional to those which appeared in the final publication, but which survive in the collection. Material relating to his historical and biographical writings on `J.J.' can be found in the collection of papers of J.J. Thomson (CSAC no. 74/4/80) in the Library of Trinity College, Cambridge.
In addition to an historical awareness, Thomson was also conscious of the impact of science on many aspects of life and thought. Section H groups together his lectures and writings on science-related topics of this kind; it includes inter alia material on his work for the Voluntary Euthanasia Society which occupied much of his interest in his later years.

Thomson, Sir George Paget (1892-1975), knght, physicist and Nobel prizewinner

Papers of Sir Geoffrey Taylor (G. I. Taylor)

  • TAYL
  • Fonds
  • 1777–1975

These surviving records are variable - even capricious - in content and time-span, for reasons inherent in Taylor's temperament, interests and methods of work. For most of his career he held research posts, especially the Yarrow Research Professorship of the Royal Society, to which he was appointed in 1923; he was thus almost wholly absolved from routine teaching, administrative, departmental or institutional tasks, and free to pursue whatever research suggested itself, or was suggested to him. He had the help of his technician, Walter Thompson, and a room in the Cavendish Laboratory, originally made available by Rutherford, who described Taylor as being paid provided he does no work'. This lack of formal establishment obligations, though ideal for Taylor's research, meant that he had no office or secretarial help. He worked with rough notes and drawings, often on any piece of paper that came to hand; even when he used a notebook of more conventional kind, the content is somewhat heterogeneous and lacks dates or headings (see B.2, B.3, for examples). Several of the official committee reports in Section C originally took the form of personal letters which were then typed out in a more acceptable official style (see, for example, C.37, C.41, C.42, C.45, C.49, C.50). Conversely, several letters in Section D are statements of research in progress, and were typed up and used as such by the recipients. Furthermore, it should be remembered that Taylor did much work at home atFarmfield', whence most of the surviving letters are addressed.

The general consequences of these conditions of work are often mentioned in biographical articles about Taylor, and are best summarised by Batchelor in his Memoir (Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society, 22, 1976), p.597

Perhaps I should explain here that, so far as I know, at no time in his life did Taylor employ a secretary or have his letters typed. The documentary evidence of what he did throughout his life consists wholly of incoming letters and papers (including, of course, his own in published form), and since his filing system was rudimentary, and dependent more on his wife's wish to contain the papers in one room than on his need to find something later, I am sure there are some gaps. He did make an effort to retain one copy of every published paper in a set of boxes, but typed or duplicated reports, by him or by someone else, often remained in the envelopes in which they were delivered, and incoming letters were collected in large brown envelopes marked only with the year. Periodically Stephanie had a clearing-up operation which led to some documents being thrown out in order to make room for new ones, and few of the letters and documents that come in before about 1960 have survived.

The result is that very little now survives by way of notebooks, experimental records or laboratory observations to document Taylor's scientific research (see Section B). In order to supplement these scanty resources, Batchelor assembled from some of Taylor's correspondents copies of letters which might permit the reconstruction of a collaborative piece of research, joint publication or substantial scientific discussion. Successful examples of this enterprise are enumerated in the introduction to Section D and itemised in the relevant entries. Because of the paucity of surviving material by Taylor himself, a list of all items in that Section which include his letters or draft replies to correspondents is also given in the introduction to Section D. In addition, Batchelor assembled many of the reports and committee papers by Taylor, and these, together with other drafts and papers found in the collection, constitute the considerable body of unpublished work brought together in Section C.

A word may be said here about Taylor's handwriting. Although he wrote a fairly standard legible hand until about 1913 (see the manuscript of the Adams Prize Essay in C.2), the `Scotia' notebook of the same year (see B.1) is in the characteristic script, resembling the waves and eddies it often describes, of most of his subsequent letters and papers. It has certain similarities with his mother's hand, especially in her later years, and is not easy to read. Most of the recipients of his letters had typed copies made.

The personal material in Section A includes documents relating to a little known episode in 1911 when Taylor was obliged to spend several months in a sanatorium with a lung infection (see A.17 - A.23), and a considerable amount of information relating to Taylor's family, and particularly to the Boole connection. Taylor's mother, Margaret, was the second of the five daughters of George Boole, and Taylor both inherited and contributed to a sense of family continuity (see especially A.79 - A.135 and introductory note). The numerous photographs in E.1 - E.15 are a useful additional record of Taylor's family, career, travels and interests.

Probably the most widely known of Taylor's achievements is the CQR anchor. Material relating to this can be found in A.157, A.160, B.6, C.22, C.23, C.79, D.26, D.63, E.14.

Taylor, Sir Geoffrey Ingram (1886–1975), knight, physicist and engineer

Papers of Sir Dennis Robertson

  • RBTN
  • Fonds
  • 1894–1963

This catalogue includes personal correspondence and papers 1894-1963; career papers 1930-62; professional correspondence 1910-63; notes 1910-63; lectures 1913-62; publications 1913-63; poetry 1899-1914; papers relating to Robertson's dramatic activities 1909-51.

Robertson, Sir Dennis Holme (1890-1963), knight, economist

Papers of Sir Arthur Eddington

  • EDDN
  • Fonds
  • 1897–1982

Eddington, Sir Arthur Stanley (1882–1944), theoretical physicist and astrophysicist

Papers of Sir Alan Hodgkin

  • HODG
  • Fonds
  • 1902–2000

This sizable archive contains the following materials. Biographical and autobiographical material 1914-2000, school and college papers 1919-36, honours and awards 1936-87, family correspondence and papers 1902-77, personal correspondence 1937-81, administrative papers relating to University and College 1938-89, research notebooks 1934-87, research files 1935-91, publications 1838-88, lectures and speeches 1950-87, papers relating to visits and conferences 1961-98, papers relating to societies and organisations 1938-89, correspondence 1945-90, photographic materials 1937-72

Hodgkin, Sir Alan Lloyd (1914–1998), knight, physiologist

Papers of Rush Rhees

  • RHEE
  • Fonds
  • 1951–1989

The papers in this archive consist of papers created by Rhees in his role as literary executor of the philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein

Rhees, Rush (1905–1989), philosopher

Papers of Robert Robson

  • ROBS
  • Fonds
  • 1936–91

The majority of the papers relate, one way or another, to the history of Trinity College. These include publications and notes, both by Robson and others, of aspects of the College's history and correspondence relating to enquiries on similar subjects. There are also papers of College committees of which Robson was a member and drafts of unpublished works.

Robson, Robert (1929–1995), historian

Papers of Robert Calverley Trevelyan and Elizabeth Trevelyan

  • TRER
  • Fonds
  • 1865-1958

The archive contains papers of both Robert Calverley Trevelyan and his wife Elizabeth (née des Amorie van der Hoeven, known as Bessie), though the majority relate to R. C. Trevelyan and comprise personal items 1872-1951, publications 1898-1950, publications 1989-1950, reviews of publications 1898-1953, photographs 1876-1949, family material.

This archive is in the process of being catalogued: the majority of the correspondence has been catalogued at item level, while around fifteen boxes predominantly containing working notebooks and photographs remain; work on these and revisions will follow.

Trevelyan, Robert Calverley (1872-1951), poet, dramatist, and translator

Papers of Robert Burn

  • BURN
  • Fonds
  • 1862–1901

The majority of the papers in this collection are flysheets (A) dealing with issues debated before the Senate, and as such form a valuable insight into subjects and opinions considered important in late nineteenth century Cambridge. Many of these, such as the accounts of various graces on compulsory Greek or reforms to the Classical Tripos, are concerned with Burn's personal academic preoccupations, but it is a measure of his versatility and dedication to the University as a whole that this collection also contains papers written by him on such questions as the plausibility of introducing degrees in Science and the necessity of widening the Cam to facilitate rowing. Also included are papers on matters of national importance, such as the University Tests Bill and the Oxford Declaration, both of which caused heated debate in the Senate and were of particular interest to Burn as a clergyman.

Another interesting feature of this collection is that the authors of many of the flysheets to be found within it are such important University figures of the last century. Jebb, Jackson and Sidgwick, amongst many others, were concerned with fighting their corner on various issues that came before the Senate, and it is through their opinions that it is possible to glimpse the origins of many events and practices (the building of the New Museums or the establishment of the Historical Tripos, to name just two) that became a reality.

The remainder of this collection consists of mark books (B) for the Classical Tripos 1862, when Burn was an examiner, and miscellaneous items (C) preserved along with the collection. The mark books are of particular importance for those interested in the history of Classics at Cambridge, as well as in its main figures: Jebb, for example, is described in a note by Burn as being better at historical prose than philosophical. Amongst the miscellanea are also items which betray the interests of Burn, but also have a much wider appeal, such as architectural plans of excavations at Rome, and accounts of lectures on Roman Art given at Rugby School.

See the attached finding aid for a more detailed description.

Burn, Robert (1829–1904), classical scholar and archaeologist

Papers of Richard Synge

  • SYNG
  • Fonds
  • 1892–1996

This large collection is uneven in its coverage but papers survive from all phases of Synge's life and career.

Section A, Biographical, is extensive. The personal material includes pocket diaries 1926, 1945-1992. There are records of Synge's childhood in the form of school work, reports and printed material, and of his time as an undergraduate at Trinity College Cambridge, principally his lecture notes and work sheets. Documentation of Synge's later career, honours and awards is patchy but there is material relating to the award of the 1952 Nobel prize for Chemistry to Synge and A.J.P. Martin. There is much family material, including correspondence between his parents during their courtship and after their marriage, and their correspondence with him, including many letters during Synge's time at Old Hall School, Winchester College and Trinity College. Family material also includes correspondence with his wife Ann and his sisters Anthea and Katharine. Synge's political interests are not particularly well documented although there is material relating to the Communist Party in the 1940s, the Society for Cultural Relations with the USSR 1946-1955 and to his later links with the peace movement including Scientists Against Nuclear Arms 1981-1991. The section also includes many photographs.

Section B, Lister Institute of Preventive Medicine, is slight. It includes correspondence and papers relating to Synge's appointment including his statement of proposed work, inventories of equipment and chemicals, and miscellaneous administrative material. There are also papers relating to Synge's visit to Tiselius's laboratory at the Fysikalisk-Kemiska Institution in Uppsala, Sweden.

Section C, Rowett Research Institute, presents documentation of Synge's appointment to the Institute, his headship of the Department of Protein and Carbohydrate Chemistry - including research programmes, equipment and staff, the Agricultural Research Council Visiting Groups to the Institute, and administrative material including sets of Institute notices and circulars. There is also material relating to the Institute's Strathcona Club of which Synge was a loyal member, and a little memorabilia.

Section D, Food Research Institute, is not extensive. It includes correspondence and papers relating to Synge's appointment including his plan of research, comments on Lord Rothschild's 1971 Green Paper A Framework for Government Research and Development, administrative papers from the Chemistry Division, and project reports on Synge's research.

Section E, Research, comprises notebooks and research notes. The notebooks document Synge's research from postgraduate studies in the mid 1930s, through work for the Wool Industries Research Association in Leeds - including the invention and development of partition chromatography, the Lister Institute, Rowett Research Institute and Food Research Institute, to post-retirement work in the 1990s on electronic storage of chemical information. The bulk of the notebooks forms a sequence I-XXVII running from 1938 to ca 1979. There are also notebooks used for references from searches of the Science Citation Index and notebooks used by three collaborators, J.C. Wood, M.A. Youngson and S. Matai. The research notes cover the period 1938-1987. They include reports on work on proteins for the Wool Industries Research Association 1938-1943, wartime work on grass protein 1939-1943 and gramicidin S 1944-1946, studies on the nutritive value of by-products of the herring industry 1949-1951, and papers relating to computer searching for chemical information searches 1981.

Section F, Publications, lectures and broadcasts, documents some of Synge's scientific publications 1940-1992, public lectures 1942-1983 and broadcasts 1947-1961. The publications material is not comprehensive. There are relatively few drafts of Synge's biochemistry publications and the best documented work is Synge's 1990 article '25 years of Science Citation Index - some experiences'. There are translations of articles in the Soviet scientific literature on gramicidin S and correspondence and papers relating to the possible translation from the Russian of Mikhail Semenovich Tsvet 1872-1919 by E.M. Senchenkova. There is also editorial correspondence. Lectures material includes documentation of some of the many public and invitation lectures Synge gave to local and university branches of learned societies and professional associations. They include his 1951 Second P.F. Frankland Memorial Lecture, 'Biological aspects of proteins in the light of recent chemical studies' to the Royal Institute of Chemistry and the Institution of Electrical Engineers. Again, there are few drafts, the bulk of the material is correspondence regarding arrangements. The section also includes drafts found in Synge's two folders inscribed `Unpublished etc' including book reviews and drafts on the history of science, and a set of the collected off-prints of Synge's published work. References to Synge's publications in this catalogue refer to the List of Publications at A/1 and appear in the form Bibliog. ...

Section G, Visits, conferences and travel, covers the period 1945-1992. The most extensively documented visit is Synge's extended stay in New Zealand 1958-1959. There is correspondence relating to arrangements, documentation of Synge's research and material relating to other engagements fulfilled during his stay. There is also material relating to the return journey, including travel on the Trans-Siberian railway. Other visits for which significant documentation survives are the 1955 International Wool Textile Research Conference in Australia, the International Symposium on the Origins of the Earth, Moscow, USSR, 1957, Synge's visits to India as a guest of the Indian Statistical Institute in 1965, 1966 and 1970, and his visit to Cuba in May 1969. There is also material relating to Synge's award of the Nobel Prize. He attended gatherings of Nobel laureates at Lindau, West Germany on several occasions and returned to Stockholm for other Nobel-related events. Synge often took his family on his visits and this is sometimes reflected in the material.

Section H, Societies and organisations, documents Synge's involvement with 24 UK and overseas organisations from ca 1936 to 1993. There is material relating to the Agricultural Research Council, principally the Ruminant Metabolism Group 1949-1953 and N.W. Pirie's proposals for research on the extraction of leaf protein 1951-1953. Also well-documented is the Association of Scientific Workers 1938-1966. Synge was an enthusiastic supporter of the Association and served as a Vice-President from 1954. Other bodies for which there is significant material are the Biochemical Society - Synge served on the Editorial Board of the Biochemical Journal 1949-1955, the British Nutrition Foundation - Synge was a scientific governor of the Foundation 1974-1979, the Royal Society, and the Royal Society of Chemistry - particularly relating to its Chemical Information Group, 1984-1987.

Section J, Correspondence, is substantial and important. There is a main sequence of principal correspondents including A.C. Chibnall, S.R. Elsden, Hugh Gordon, Dorothy Hodgkin, J.H. Humphrey, H.R. Marston, A.J.P. Martin, Stanford Moore, N.W. Pirie, P.L. Robinson, F. Sanger and Arne Tiselius. There is also a chronological sequence of shorter scientific correspondence, requests for off-prints, and references and recommendations.

Synge, Richard Laurence Millington (1914-1994), biochemist

Papers of R. B. McKerrow

  • MCKW
  • Fonds
  • 1858–1945

This collection contains correspondence of McKerrow, mainly relating to bibliography and English literature, with various writings by him on the same subjects; early attempts at fiction, verse, and drama; and some personal papers. There are also some family papers, including papers relating to the firm of Brunlees & McKerrow and the estate of Sir James Brunlees, and letters written by McKerrow’s son Malcolm during the Second World War, describing his experiences with the Non-Combatant Corps and the Auxiliary Military Pioneer Corps.

McKerrow, Ronald Brunlees (1872-1940), bibliographer and literary scholar

Papers of Piero Sraffa

  • SRAF
  • Fonds
  • 1905–1983

Personal and family papers 1916-80, official papers 1905-81, correspondence 1911-83, miscellaneous notes 1923-63, notes for lectures 1927-31 and 1941-43, publications 1920-73, diaries 1927-81, bibliographical notes

Sraffa, Piero (1898-1983), economist

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