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Fry, Roger Eliot (1866–1934), art historian, critic, and painter
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Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad to get Elizabeth's card, as was slightly anxious about the crossing [to the Netherlands] they just escaped what seems to have been a terrible gale in the Channel on Thursday. Asks if she and Robert got her letters at the Langham; if not, Robert should write to the manager as she does not want the postal orders she sent him to be lost. Very glad Elizabeth's uncle is better and that she feels well herself. The book ["Polyphemus and Other Poems"] arrived yesterday; they think it 'very attractive & quaint'; Sir George will write to Robert about it. Thinks it should have some success. The title page and 'Swallow' [illustrations by Roger Fry] are very pretty; likes the poem "The [Lady's] Bat" particularly, though she does not think the picture such a success. Sends their regards to Elizabeth's uncle, cousin Marie, and all her family, and hopes she has a very happy week.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Hotel des Alpes, Mürren. - Arrived yesterday and plan to stay for more than a week; it is a 'wonderful place' though the air is 'rather fatiguing' at first. She will rest today; Sir George is very well and 'walks a great deal'. The electric railway to Interlaken is pleasant and travels through some fine passes. Very sorry to hear from Elizabeth about the Russells; [their separation] is 'surprising and very sad'; sure Russell is 'difficult, & the family are rather uncompromising' but he is 'a quiet good fellow'; does not know her [Alys] well but thought she seemed 'to belong to another "monde"'. Likes to think of Julian almost walking; asked what is settled about the nurses, and whether Mrs Catt is going to the hospital; it is very sad. People must be very anxious about the weather [for the Coronation]; is glad to be 'out of it all'; Mürren is completely quiet, with no road for carriages, and Bob would love it. Glad Julian likes his cart. George says [he and Janet] are going on 12 July to the Lakes, and would like to come to Wallington in September; asks if Elizabeth and Robert could be there for some of that time. Is glad the [Lake] Hunt was a success once more, it is 'a wonderful institution'. Thinks C[harles] and M[ary] will enjoy themselves at the [Coronation] festivities. Sends love to Robert, and asks if Mr [Roger] Fry is coming.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Looks forward to discussing his book ["The American Revolution", Volume II] with Robert when it is read. The preliminary reviews are good, and the longer reviews in 'the great provincial papers' are 'most satisfactory'. He and Caroline are very distressed about the [Roger] Frys. They have had a 'famous old Harrovian shooting party': [Lord?] Ridley, [Lord?] Belper, Kenelm Digby, Charles and Sir George; good to increase 'old friendships, which had been loosened by politics for so long a time'. Belper is 'great fun, a humourist of a rough and strong sort' and a 'wonderful man of public business'; he took up an old argument about whether Sir George should have left him a gun-bag in Ireland exactly as it was left 41 years ago. Glad the plans for Robert and Elizabeth's new house are 'in fair train'.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - They 'rejoice with' Robert at Roger Fry's success [his appointment as Curator of Paintings at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York]; glad that Robert will not lose his friend but see so much of him when he comes to England. Thinks Fry's father [Sir Edward] did a 'very fine thing' in returning money [part of his remuneration, to the Metropolitan Water Board] the other day; the 'disinterestedness' it demonstrated has much declined recently. Glad that Campbell-Bannerman's government has taken the step of 'revindicating honesty and public spirit'; was 'disgraceful' of Balfour to reverse the last Liberal government's veto on [ministers] keeping directorships. Agrees with Robert in looking forward to the parliamentary session, especially to the Budget. Sir George and Caroline want to give Robert and Elizabeth a 'minute interest in the Budget' by paying them fifty pounds twice a year instead of making good the income tax on their allowance. Went to the British Museum on Saturday and found a 'Liberal atmosphere' everywhere in London; Welby and Sir Courtenay Ilbert 'seemed to breathe very freely in it'. Has finished Catullus and will read the "[Appendix] Virgiliana" today.

Letter from Robert Oswald Sickert to R. C. Trevelyan

12 Pembroke Gardens, Kensington. - Never sent Trevelyan the copy of the Bat [his poem"The Lady's Bat] for him to correct. Grant Richards wants to start printing ["The Bird In Song", see 6/47] at once; if Trevelyan cannot return the enclosed in time, they will take the punctuation from Brimley Johnson's book. Still trying to find a title; if Trevelyan can think of one which is 'pretty but not too elaborate' he will offer him 'half the royalty that G.R. has not offered' [him and Stanley Makower]. Has just discovered that F. Noel Paton brought out "Bards and the Birds" in 1894, but this is not well done. Hopes Roger [Fry] will buy all the Old Masters 'that are good enough for Boston but not too good'. Stanley is well as is his baby daughter.

Letter from Bessie Sickert to R. C. Trevelyan

17, Berners Street, W.1. - Thanks Trevelyan for his letter enclosing one from Roger Fry. Is happy for Oswald's papers to be published; Arthur Waley suggests that the Hogarth Press might take them, especially if Walter [Sickert] were to write a foreword. The papers need revising, and she would be very grateful if Trevelyan could do this; he must say if he is too busy. If he is in town soon they could lunch and discuss the idea.

Letter from E. M. Forster to Elizabeth Trevelyan

West Hackhurst, Abinger Hammer, Dorking. - Tried to ring up, but the telephone was out of order. Sorry to hear Bessie's news, especially as he was hoping to see her more often. Asks where she is going: he and Goldie [Dickinson] used to like Lyme Regis; Sidmouth has a new public garden laid out by Dartington Hall; he likes Eastbourne the best of the nearer resorts. Asks if she sent a letter to Gerald Heard at the Buckinghams: B. [Bob] is intrigued. Is enjoying Roger's book [Roger Fry's translations of Mallarme?].

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Chelsea. - Originally enclosing an account for housekeeping expenses: Trevelyan should take off the rent if he did in fact pay up to Lady Day. Explains how he has reckoned coal and wine. Had a good time on the river: Jack [McTaggart] 'delighted with his own absurdities and limitations'. Is going to Heathfield [Heathfield Park, home of William Cleverly Alexander?] again to paint.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

c/o R. W. Reynolds, 2 Hare Court, Temple, E.C. - Returns Trevelyan's poems; he has been unable to write a 'proper criticism', though he makes a few comments about the "Orpheus", which he very much likes, and the "Elegiacs", where there are some lines which give the same feeling as Poynters and Alma Tadenas - 'sham classical pictures'. Will reread the "Epimetheus" then send it on. Fry and his wife are going to try and get the Berners Street flat; Trevelyan must say if it doesn't suit him. They think he will be able to have both a bed room and sitting room. The initials are getting on very well.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivyholt, Dorking. - Is glad Trevelyan is back: will be working on the Colchester lecture until the 18th so invites him to visit then. The Albert Hall ones are finished and went well. He and Helen have not yet found Trevelyan a house, though the one they looked at [see 4/20] is still free; the wine has not arrived yet. Asks how Trevelyan's play "Cecilia" ["Cecilia Gonzaga"] is getting on. Helen and Goldie [Dickinson] are 'offensively & increasingly Daily Telegraphic together'.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivyholt. - Apologises for the delay in writing: Helen wanted to address a poem to Trevelyan about his flowers though Fry has warned her Melodie Dolmetsch [sic: Elodie, Arnold Dolmetsch's second wife] had no success that way. Thinks they will not visit till the end of the month. Is reading Balzac. His portrait of the 'O.B.' [Oscar Browning] got very like but he has made him 'a little sanctimonious': thinks he will be able to put this right, but doubts whether he is good at likeness or character. The proofs [of his book on Giovanni Bellini] have gone; mocks himself for his Gallicisms. Offers to talk to White regarding the disagreement over Trevelyan's taking a lease on a house: thinks it would be best to insist the lease is terminable in case of building. Doodle of Pegasus. A line in Helen Fry's hand should introduce a poem, but nothing follows: incomplete letter?

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivy Holt, Dorking. - Is writing to Trevelyan instead of working on his lectures on the Byzantines. Has just read [Stephen] Philips "P&F" ["Paolo and Francesca"] and shares Trevelyan's conclusions: it is very English and there is no real poetry in it. Trevelyan, Binyon and Moore are far superior, but it is Philips whom the critics praise. Has had an irritating letter from Mrs Grandmont. Yes, Moretto was a Brescian. Describes the Frys' journey back from Italy. Has been to Westcott and thinks the house will do very well: will get to work with the friezes soon. Helen says they will be delighted to have Amica [Elizabeth van der Hoeven] any time in February; hopes he will have some time free from lecturing to show her around Dorking. His arch at the New English [Art Club] looks 'abominable'. Hopes Trevelyan and Berenson will sort things out. Sends love to Ravello.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Leeds. - Definitely thinks that [Johnson] is acting unfairly over the publication of the book [Trevelyan's "Polyphemus and Other Poems", with illustrations by Roger Fry]. Will go and see him on his return; meanwhile Trevelyan could have the contract seen by the Authors' Society. Glasgow very full [for the Glasgow International Exhibition] - Fry ended up sleeping at a 'coffee room' - but extremely interesting: the Municipal Gallery [Kelvingrove] is fine; Fry does not believe it's a Giorgione. Also saw Newbattle [Abbey] though due to a storm he could only see the Piero di Cosimo ["Vulcan and Aeolus"] by gas light. Goes tomorrow to Liverpool, then to Gloucester to take B.B. [Berenson] to Sir H[ubert] Parry's house before returning to Dorking. Is sorry to have been unsympathetic about Trevelyan's 'Indian play' ["The Pearl-Tree"?].

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivy Holt, Dorking. - Thanks Trevelyan for the cheque and the extra £5, which he will not refuse; has had more work than he expected over the book ["Polyphemus and Other Poems"] Hopes Johnson will put pressure on the blockcutters and get it out before the end of the month. Illness in the family, but all now recovering.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivy Holt, Dorking. - Went to see the Duchess [portrait of Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire, exhibited for sale at Agnews] and came to the same conclusion as Trevelyan [that it was not by Gainsborough: see "Athenaeum", Nov 23 1901, p.766]. Trevelyan is also quite right about the Chigi picture: has written to Binyon about it for the "Northern Chronicle". Is sorry 'it's been such a long & weary business for Bessie' and hopes it's over. Has begun on [the restoration of] Cook's altarpiece.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivy Holt, Dorking. - He and Helen much distressed to hear of Ida Cresswell's marital difficulties: her husband's affair seems insane, but she is brave and will pull through. Is leaning towards beech trees for Trevelyan's picture; will send some ideas of composition soon: thinks he has the pose of the figures. Has finished the second volume of the "Arabian Nights". Has finished Horne's and Mrs Gibson's pictures. The family is well though Julian is upset not to be able to dig outside because of the weather. They have met a 'very nice curate'. They go to Failand on the 27th and then on to Bruge. Saw Entiknapp [Enticknap].

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Dorking. - Asks why Trevelyan thought he might have died: did he see the death of Fry the bookmaker in an Italian paper? Was in fact not at all well yesterday. The children have had measles and the weather is dreadful: is determined not to spend another winter in Britain. They have taken the house at Hampstead [22 Willow Road] but the landlord is making difficulties about allowing alterations. The Piero di Cosimo scheme has fallen though.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Madeira Cottage, Lyme Regis. - Still more or less an invalid and can write while Helen is taking walks with Margery and the nurse. Helen is certainly in a better and more stable condition. The masque [for the opening of the new library at Somerville College, see 4/55] would be put on in June so he supposes Trevelyan will not be able to manage it, but it would be a pity. They want a mythological subject, the Triumph of Athene over Aphrodite and Juno, and Margery could send details. Asks where the Trevelyans are planning to go abroad. Stresses that he does like Bertie's article [Russell's "Free Man's Worship"].

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Does not know why Trevelyan has not received the enclosed [now missing: an invitation for Fry's exhibition at the Alpine Club?]: Trevelyan's father says he cannot come but has the dates wrong. Is fascinated by [Forster's] "The Longest Journey": reminds him more of Gorky than anything else. Logan [Pearsall Smith], however, 'kicks at it'. Is going to Perugia tomorrow for the Exhibition ["Mostra di antica arte umbra"]. Helen is much better. Does not think they will manage the Tovey concerts this time. A postscript notes that [William John?] Evelyn will not agree to the necessary improvements, so the Frys are still househunting.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

L.B.S.C.R [London, Brighton and South Coast Railway?]. - Apologises for not writing: has been very tired and Helen 'in the difficult exalted mood'. Is going to Paris for two days, 'museuming' with a Trustee [of the Metropolitan Museum of Art]. Is sorry not to have seen Trevelyan; hopes Helen's phase will pass soon as it is 'far more trying than the depression'. Asks to see Trevelyan's "Sisyphus". The Frys have taken a house at Guildford for nine months, then hopes their own will be built. Hopes Paul is well again.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Chantry Dene, Guildford. - Thinks this proof [for Trevelyan's "Sisyphus: an operatic fable"] all right: asks to see title page proofs . Goldie [Dickinson] has not been after all; he went instead to Scarborough; is coming from Saturday to Monday. Helen is much the same; Dr Head comes today, will settle when the children are to come.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Chantry Dene, Guildford. - Is very grateful for Trevelyan's letter and Bessie's offer to look after the children. Had not at first thought of the Dakynses, but they are happy to have the children till Sunday or Monday. Helen is better and he hopes an 'actual outbreak' may be staved off, but the timing when he is working hard for his show[at the Carfax Gallery] is difficult.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Chantry Dene, Guildford. - Possible arrangements for meeting after a trip to Paris [for the Metropolitan Museum of Art]. Goldie [Dickinson] wants to visit: asks if Trevelyan can send him a wire; suggests bringing Logan [Pearsall Smith] over on Tuesday so Fry can show them the new house. Thinks Trevelyan will like it: the neighbourhood regard it as 'the most hideous thing ever produced'. Will try to go to some of the concerts. Has been with Helen at Bourton-on-the-Water and has left her there; Mr Bowhay still has hope, but she 'still despises the whole world... if once that could be overcome she would be almost completely well.'

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Durbins. - Is glad Trevelyan has got work with the Friends [Friends War Victims Relief Committee]. Vildrac is in Italy with the army, he thinks behind the lines; Mme Vildrac is out of Paris as well so there is almost no one he knows there now. His new doctor has diagnosed gall bladder trouble; is following a new course of treatment. Sorry that Trevelyan's visit was 'complicated' by Dolmetsch's presence and his own business. Has had a letter from Jack Mc[Taggart] full of high spirits and 'idealism over the war'.

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