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Letter from F. W. Farrar to Henry Sidgwick

Urges HS to complete his 'Essay' as quickly as possible, as the collection [Essays on a Liberal Education, edited by Farrar] 'ought to come out this publishing season'. Warns that 'changes are now going on in some schools, and the attention of school and University authorities is aroused.' Tells Sidgwick to send his essay, when finished, to Messers Clay. Informs him that he shall be 'here' till the end of August, at which time he shall return to Harrow.

Farrar, Frederic William (1831–1903) Dean of Canterbury, novelist, and philologist

Letter from F. W. Farrar to Henry Sidgwick

With regard to Sidgwick's essay, declares it to be well-reasoned, and expresses his supreme satisfaction with it. Asks for Sidgwick's criticisms of his [Farrar's] essay, on which [Charles Stuart?] Parker had given him 'some very valuable hints'. Is pleased that Sidgwick praises his friend Mr Joseph Payne, and informs him that Payne and Dr [William?] Hodgson are two very leading men at the College of [Preceptors]. Refers to a book on education by Mr [ ], which he declares to be 'thoroughly shallow'. Refers to a conversation with [William] Johnson [Cory], in which the latter mentioned a conference with Sidgwick, and asks him to explain a reference Johnson made to it. Expresses his hopes in relation to the latter's essay. Predicts the volume of essays [Essays on a Liberal Education, edited by Farrar] to be a valuable one, speaks favourably of the writings of Wilson, Seeley and Sidgwick, and judges Bowen's to be 'a little disappointing.' Reports that Lytton cannot contribute because of an illness. Expresses his intention of returning to Harrow on 27 August. Includes a list of queries about, and suggested changes to, Sidgwick's essay.

Farrar, Frederic William (1831–1903) Dean of Canterbury, novelist, and philologist

Letter from F. W. Farrar to Henry Sidgwick

Refers to letter he sent that morning. Expresses his satisfaction with the progress of the Essays [on a Liberal Education, edited by Farrar], and praises those of Wilson, Seeley and Sidgwick as being 'most weighty and excellent'. Expresses the hope that he can secure some reviews, and asks Sidgwick to use his influence in that direction also, with, for example, Lord Houghton. Declares his intention of writing to Dr William Smith, and of trying 'to get the Quarterly [Review] to speak.' Asks Sidgwick for suggestions with regard to the preface. States his intention to try 'to get up a gathering at my home before the end of September.'

Farrar, Frederic William (1831–1903) Dean of Canterbury, novelist, and philologist

Letter from F. W. Farrar to Henry Sidgwick

Thanks Sidgwick for his criticisms of his essay, and explains some of the references therein. Gives directions as to how Sidgwick may receive further proofs, and reminds him that corrections at the final stage are very expensive. With reference to his [Farrar's] Greek Syntax, which is in its second edition, states his intention of sending a copy of it to Sidgwick the following term, if he has not yet come across it, and asks for his criticisms.

Farrar, Frederic William (1831–1903) Dean of Canterbury, novelist, and philologist

Letter from F. W. Farrar to Henry Sidgwick

Writes in relation to the volume of Essays to which they both are contributors [Essays on a Liberal Education, edited by Farrar]. Sends his idea of what the order of authors should be, and asks for Sidgwick's opinion. Declares Johnson's essay to be 'unluckily conservative' but 'of interest to all schoolmasters.' Invites Sidgwick to dine at his house on Saturday 5 October. Informs him that only one or two of the contributors shall be there.

Farrar, Frederic William (1831–1903) Dean of Canterbury, novelist, and philologist

Letter from F.W. Farrar to Henry Sidgwick

Cannot come to Cambridge to vote, but heartily approves of the proposed change in the Previous Examination. States that he is aware that many parents have been anxiously awaiting the day when modern languages 'shall be accepted in lieu of Greek at the Universities in the case of boys destined for commercial or similar pursuits.' Believes that the proposed change may induce some parents who would not other wise have done so to send their sons to college. In relation to the proposed scheme of the inspection of schools by the universities, states that he believes it to be 'undesirable and dangerous.'

Farrar, Frederic William (1831–1903) Dean of Canterbury, novelist, and philologist