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Trevelyan, Charles Humphry (1909-1964) lecturer in German and author
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Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Pen Rose, Berkhamsted. - Has enjoyed reading [Robert's translation of Sophocles'] "Antigone"; Humphry also looked at it 'with great interest' since he has been studying the original at school. The translation seems as 'excellent and successful' as Bob's translation of the "Oresteia"; hopes it will also be acted at Old Sarum. Sends love to Bessie, and to Julian when he 'comes home [from school]'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

36 Chelsea Park Gardens, SW3 [written on Athenaeum headed notepaper]. - Glad that Mary is visiting Bob and Bessie again. Went to Hallington two days ago, since he was lecturing at the Newcastle Lit[erary] and Phil[osophical Society], thinks it is 'a possible place to live in some day' if they had enough money to do so comfortably, with a motorcar 'which would be essential'. It is a 'conceivability in the future' since Mary and H[umphry] are 'fond of Northumberland', but for the moment they have 'two dear old ladies [Sarah and Matilda Spencer] as tenants' who keep the house and grounds in good repair; there is also a good tenant at the Cheviot farm. The 'immediate value of the place is, as always, rather less than appears on paper' due to charges and so on; a third of the net annual amount will go to Bob, as agreed.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Glad that Elizabeth has heard of some nurses who may suit her, but sorry that she has this trouble. Good that Julian is so well; she and Sir George hope to visit in October and see him. Thinks [E. M.] Forster must be interesting, since his novels are 'so clever & original', though she does not think he manages plot well. Has been reading [Myra Kelly's] "Little Aliens", about 'the little Jew children in America', which is 'pretty & funny; but quite slight'. Sorry Mr [Donald] Tovey is not progressing quickly, but it must require much work to write the music for an opera ["The Bride of Dionysus"]; probably best that it will not be put on next summer, as 'the world will be simply mad over the Coronation'. George's children are 'much improved': Mary has shown no signs of temper; Theo is 'passionate occasionally' but still young, and a 'very nice boy'; [Humphry] seems quite strong now.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Trinity College, Cambridge. - Likes "Cheiron" very much, and will be "proud of the dedication". Is much interested in Bob's latest classical plays, which take him into a thoroughly pleasant 'world of moral, intellectual and aesthetic imagination', and 'criticize real life' without 'directly setting out' to do so. Postscript at top of letter says that Humphry is enjoying his classical studies, and life in general, in Cambridge very much.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Thanks Bessie for her letter, and for enclosing Madame [Irene] Zocco's; very glad to hear 'how well and splendid Julian is ', which makes up for their sadness about the nurse's illness. Glad Julian has curls; Humphry is also 'very curly' but this is 'more out of the family line' for them. He and Mary 'play Lake Regillus and Horatius on the Museum floor' with some soldiers and some 'ancient Romans' he once got in Switzerland; she is 'very clever and sharp at the uptake'. Meanwhile Theo usually rides the rocking horse, though he looks on a little, 'and spouts the poems' [by Macaulay]. He is 'very much interested' ('much' is an insertion as 'concession to Jan's hereditary ideas of grammar') about [Donald] Tovey; takes it that his progress [on the opera "The Bride of Dionysus", to Robert's libretto] is 'slow but sure'. Must be very interesting to watch him at work. Can easily believe what she says about Forster's book ["Howard's End"], which would make it 'like all his others'; he is 'just one half of a great writer' and could do with being boiled down by 'Peer Gynt's button moulder' with 'some ordinary mechanic writer who can spin him a common likely plot'. Sends love to Bob and wishes 'success to his Solomon, and the Sage' [a reference to Bob's "Foolishness of Solomon"?].

Note from Janet offering condolences for 'poor Nurse Catt's departure'; asks to be remembered to her before she leaves.

Letter from Janet Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

2, Cheyne Gardens, S.W. - Her baby [Humphry] has been much better yesterday and today, though he is not quite well yet. Did know about the Walker-Gordon milk, and will order it when Humphry returns to cows' milk; at the moment he is 'only having white-of-egg and water in his one bottle'. He is obviously 'very sensitive to the slightest impurity in milk' and they will have to be careful, but has stayed 'most cheerful' throughout. Thinks of Bessie and Bob 'so often & so sadly'; is sure [the death of their son Paul' 'must get worse & worse' for them. Tells her to come and see her again soon. Notes in a postscript that her other two are 'quite flourishing again'; Theo 'has been turned into a real boy, with knickers and short hair!'

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Garden Corner, West Road, Cambridge. - Very sorry Bob was not able to come: was looking forward to seeing him 'after too long an interval'. Daphne [Sanger or Phelps?] and Humphry went to see "Antigone" [Bob's translation of Sophocles' play, performed at the Cambridge Festival Theatre] and said though it was 'in some respects well acted', the words were 'badly and rather inaudibly said'. George himself 'feared to go after Prometheus'. Has just read Bob's "Three Plays": "Sulla" captured his imagination most; supposes the Romans were 'both more brutal and more artistic than the English', and this combination 'has always disgusted [him]'. Wishes Bob good health 'to enjoy the new Shiffolds'. Hopes that he and Elizabeth will come for a visit to Hallington this summer.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Elizabeth must be finding the heat very trying, as she is. Mary is recovering well [after her miscarriage]; C[harles] is coming this week. She and Booa think Elizabeth has made the best decision about the nurses, though it is very sad that Mrs Catt is not well enough to return. Thinks Julian may talk when he is sharing the day nursery with Mary and Humphry; Janet says Humphry 'chatters incessantly'. Asks her to thank Robert for sending the poem; is sorry that Robert has been worried about the opera ["The Bride of Dionysus"]; Hugo Bell reported that [Donald] Tovey was very interested in his work on it. Tovey must be a very pleasant guest; sends her regards. Glad Elizabeth has the Reas as neighbours; it 'makes so much difference to have one house where they are not just local'. Is not giving a party for her neighbours this year, due to Molly's indisposition, so is asking them to small tea parties. The E[xhibition] is on Saturday, and the tenants party on the 24th. Mrs Rea's puzzle was very difficult, and she had to come and help Sir George with it; it was 'so ugly too' but interesting. They are 'shocked and grieved' by the strikes and riots; finds it hard to understand; does not quite agree with Sir George about it. Glad the Peers gave way, or there would have been a 'great reaction'; the crisis is now over and the Tories divided, so something must be done. Sir George has inflammation they think must be gout in his finger. Glad the fruit arrived in decent condition.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Hopes Elizabeth is not over-burdened with 'guests & small worries', and that she might be able to do some good for her cousin [one of the Hubrechts?] and his wife; always difficult, but 'the mere fact of his relations being kind to her' may help; it is all very sad and unfortunate for their child. Is glad Julian 'flourishes'; expects it will be good for him to be in the nursery with the other children [Mary and Humphry], who will be there throughout Elizabeth's visit. G[eorge] and J[anet] will come for a week, and Aunt Annie [Philips] will also be visiting then. Hopes to hear about Robert's plans for travel abroad in the winter. Hopes the game arrived; will send some grapes on Monday. Thoughts on the strikes: sympathises with the men, and there is 'something fine in them acting together', but the violence has been very unfortunate, and the economic impact great. Churchill 'seems to have made mistakes' but it was hard 'in such a storm' to see clearly; Sir George thinks he was 'not strong enough at first'. Amusing that the House of Lords has been so entirely forgotten. The [tenants'] party was on Thursday, and went well except for a little rain; Sir George and Charles made speeches, and Geordie said afterwards 'That was nice poetry'. He, Pauline and Kitty gave their grandparents a concert the other day; their governess is 'clever at getting up little entertainments' and they sing 'very prettily' now. Audrey Trevelyan has been to visit, and they like her a lot. Sends love to Bob; hopes Mr [Donald] Tovey will have done much work on the opera ["The Bride of Dionysus"] before he goes.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Has found the photograph of Julian which she likes, and put it into a frame so she does not lose it again. Asks if Elizabeth knows Lady Bell's reading book ["Pauline's First Reading Book"?]; will send it if not. Asks if she likes teaching; she herself liked reading to the children, but 'never managed to teach them anything'. They hope to get through [to Welcombe] on Wednesday. Hopes Mrs A[bercrombie] is better, and that Elizabeth's nannie returns in better health. Janet and the children are coming on the 9th; there is news of G[eorge], and a 'very interesting letter from Rome'. Annie [Philips] is expecting Robin [Price] for a short stay at Pen Moel; supposes he will go abroad soon. Sends best wishes to Mrs V[aughan] Williams and Margaret, and love to Robert; his 'little "pome" looks nice in print'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Very interested to hear Elizabeth's account of Mary, who says she enjoyed staying at the Shiffolds very much; when she was here alone last year, she tended to get 'very low-spirited at bed time'. The little boy [Humphry] is 'pretty and lively'. Seems a good idea for Elizabeth to go to the sea; would probably benefit Julian as well. Annie [Philips] stayed a week; feels 'quite dull without her'; the [Francis Wrigley] Hirsts and Phill [Morgan Philips Price] came for Sunday. Mrs Hirst is in better health, and 'very good fun'.

Letter from Helmut Ruhemann to R. C. Trevelyan

The Bothy, Sudeley Castle, Winchcombe, Glos. - Received Trevelyan's 'lovely Christmas present' ["From the Shiffolds"] on Saturday when about to go on a short journey; wanted to take the booklet with him but his wife thought it was 'too precious'; apologises for the resulting 'uncivil delay' for thanks, as he wanted to read the poems before replying. Loves the 'warmth and wisdom' in all Trevelyan's poems; lists some which he 'adore[s]'. Will always be reminded of the evening when Trevelyan read some of them to him and they 'went on accompanying one another to our bedrooms, like schoolboys'. Read some of the 'delightful' essays in "Windfalls" recently, which he bought as a friend's birthday present after finding it in an 'amazing little bookshop... in this village; they have all the best things and read them'. Read an excellent notice on Julian's exhibition [at the Lefevre Gallery] and wishes he could have seen it; is 'too cowardly to go to London yet', and hopes Trevelyan has not been 'troubled by bombs or rockets'. Met Humphry Trevelyan and his 'charming wife' and fancies he has 'made friends with them'. Hopes to see Trevelyan again some time and meet his wife; his own wife also loves the poems.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Glad Elizabeth has someone to nurse her, and hopes she will now improve and be able to get to the sea. Dreadful weather, with fog and mist; thinks there are floods. Mary is taking her first ride; finds her 'very nice and companionable'; [Humphry] is 'sweet, & still rather pathetic'. Thinks they go home on Saturday as G[eorge] and J[anet] are away for just a fortnight. The 'Kenyons of the BM, the H[enry] Y[ates] T[hompson]s and Nora [Trevelyan]' are coming for next Sunday. Would like to hear Julian say doctor; 'he will have to say 'baby' before long'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Glad Elizabeth is feeling better; thinks she has been 'keeping up too long' and should rest more. The river is flooding all over the fields and the farmers are suffering. Mr Clarke came last night as it is the rent day; they are giving the farmers back 15 % and she has had letters of thanks from many of them. Charlie's treatment seems to be 'bring[ing] out the complaint'. The children go home on Saturday as G[eorge] and J[anet] are not staying on; Mary has been good, and spent a lot of time with Sir George 'over the puzzles'; [Humphry] is 'very sweet & funny'. Worries about Elizabeth being cold if she goes to lodgings [by the sea].

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Hallington Hall, Newcastle-on-Tyne (22 miles). - Agrees that 'things seem to be going better in the Wallington family' [see 14/138]; Molly is 'very grateful' to Bob. Discussed Bob's 'kind suggestion' about the classics books which used to belong to Macaulay with Charles last night: both think the idea that they should go to Trinity or Wallington 'excellent', and that Trinity would be best 'as more classical scholars will always be assembled there': Macaulay's journals, which George has given to Trinity, have 'already been much studied there'. Otherwise Wallington in the hands of the N.T. [National Trust] would be a 'permanent resting place'. Asks if he may discuss Bob's suggestion of leaving the Greek classics to Humphry for his life with Humphry when he visits in a few days.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Hopes Elizabeth is still enjoying herself. Has had 'good accounts of Julian'; Pauline likes 'having him to herself'. Has had an interesting letter from Bob from Pekin [Beijing]; he has certainly seen 'wonderful things'. Thinks they will leave London on 8 February; has to go attend Court on the 7th so cannot go to the concert with Elizabeth, but there is one the week before. Janet and the children [Mary and Humphry] visited yesterday; they leave on Friday and have not yet ben able to let their house. Has had a letter from Mad[emoisel]le [Adila?] Aranyi suggesting what sounds like a 'very attractive' programme; has sent out many invitations. She and Sir George walked in the gardens of Holly Lodge [Campden Hill] this afternoon; the [Edmund] Lambs were not there. Asks if Elizabeth will be back on Monday, and sends regards to her sister [Mien]; asks if she has heard much music. Mary was due to 'be on the sofa today, which is very good progress' [after the birth of her daughter Marjorie]

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Hallington Hall, Newcastle-on-Tyne. - Has talked to Humphry: thinks they both feel that if Bob would like to leave the Greek classics [books which once belonged to Macaulay] to Humphry for his life, it would be much appreciated it. If Humphry ever became unable to house the books, he would make them over to Trinity at once, or Wallington if Bob decided that way, otherwise they would go there on his death [see also 14/137].

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon - Glad to hear that all is well; hopes the extra nurse will stay until the A[bercrombies] move as she thinks the large party is too much for Elizabeth's nannie's nerves, though she is very good for Julian alone. Mary and H[umphry] leave today, to general regret. Thinks people are 'very foolish to take Belgians into there [sic] own families'; the money they spend would be much more efficiently used by the Committee. '[Q]uite wonderful how far Janet makes it go'; never realised she was so capable; hopes she will not over-tire herself, though understand why people do too much as the war is 'so pitiful & ghastly'. Finds it hard herself to stay at home and do so little, and 'one's power of helping in money is rapidly diminishing'. Nothing yet settled about No. 8 [Grosvenor Crescent], but it is not too expensive now. 57 men from Snitterfield have joined the army; they see 'a good deal' of the regiment based at Stratford. Lucky that Elizabeth is not nearer the sea because of the bombing. Charlie seems well; the little girls [Marjorie and Kitty, perhaps Pauline?] are to come to London soon.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Hallington Hall, Newcastle- on-Tyne. - Thanks Bessie for her letter; has written to [Herbert Mayow] Adams, the Trinity Librarian, asking him to communicate with her, though he may be on holiday and thus not able to write at once. Very glad Humphry is going to act as [Bob's] unofficial literary executor; is sure he will do it well. Sorry that Bessie's arthritis has been causing her pain; Janet has no pain but is 'dreadfully incapacitated'. Would much like 'the "homely" photo of Bob'. They do not come south until 16 October.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

23 West Road, Cambridge. - Sorry to hear that Bessie has been ill again; Janet 'keeps much the same from day to day'. Interested and pleased by the letter Bessie quoted from her German friend; has instructed Longmans to send a copy of his "Autobiography and other essays" to Bessie for her. Glad Humphry and Molly are going to see her.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Garden Corner, West Road, Cambridge. - The "Abinger Chronicle" is 'quite delightful'; V.W.'s piece [Ralph Vaughan Williams "Local Musicians", Vol 1. No 3] was 'first class and so characteristic of him'. Sends on a magazine he has received with a review of Bob's ["Collected"?] works. He and Janet are going to Hallington for a fortnight on Thursday. Molly [and Humphry]'s new baby, Mary Harriet, 'seems quite a success'.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Thanks for Elizabeth and Robert's letters; has written to Bertrand to ask for the address. [George and Janet's] children are 'very good and happy'; the little girl [Mary] is 'awed by the empty part of the house' but likes this part of it, and the garden in snow, and has a good appetite, while Humphry is 'a little dear'. Robert can keep [Montagu?] Butler's verses; was pleased by 'the tribute to his sympathetic and inspiring mode of teaching'; interested by his accounts of trees falling, as there has been 'sad havoc' played with the shrubs in the carriage way.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Garden Corner, West Road, Cambridge. - Thanks Bob for his "Horace" ["Translations from Horace, Juvenal and Montaigne: with two imaginary conversations"]: liked the two dialogues at the end best; glad that Bob's idea of Horace matches his own. Asks if Bob has read John Buchan's biography of Augustus, which he thinks 'so good if true, and the ancient historians say it is true and accurate'. Is going to Wallington for a week at Christmas, since Hallington is occupied by the R.A.F., while Janet visits Humphry and Mary. Then they have a 'hectic fortnight' moving into the Lodge [at Trinity], where the workmen are currently very busy: 'If Hitler doesn't put in a bomb, it will... look better inside than it has looked for many a long year'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

2, Cheyne Gardens, S.W. - He and Janet heard about Bob's 'trouble' yesterday, with 'the deepest concern'. Cannot come down this weekend easily, but can do so any day next week and stay for a few nights at a neighbouring hotel, go out with Bob, and see Bessie too if he can. Would bring things to do so he could occupy himself when not wanted. Bob only needs to write or send a telegram, not only if [Paul] is 'taken desperately ill again', which he trusts will not now happen, but if Bob feels 'low' and thinks George could be 'any comfort or even amusement' to him or Bessie. Assures him in a postscript that Jan is 'quite all right' [after the birth of their son Humphry?] and he need not stay with her.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

The Master's Lodge, Trinity College, Cambridge. - Is also sending this letter to Aunt Annie [Philips], Humphry and Mary. Charles, largely on his wife and George's advice, has decided to hand over the Wallington house and estate to the National Trust at once, reserving a life interest for himself in its management; he requests the National Trust to allow Molly, or one of his children, to stay in the rent for a nominal amount after his death, and for the NT to vest the management of the estate in one of his children; the NT have agreed to declare their intention to do so, though they cannot put themselves under legal obligation without also incurring death duties; George states that the Trust will 'certainly fulfil its promise'. He himself approves of the arrangement, having as Executor of Charles's Will urged it on him since it avoids death duties. Did 'not take a decided view' on whether Wallington ought to be left to the Trust, but when he saw that Charles was determined to do so he became his Executor to 'make it easy as possible for all concerned'; the war and 'probable state of things' afterwards make him 'more favourably disposed towards the plan', as he is convinced that neither [Charles's son] George nor anyone else would be able to 'run the estate burdened with death duties without selling the treasures of Wallington or large parts of the estate or both', and so on 'from generation to generation'. A lengthy handwritten final paragraph acknowledges that the younger George has been 'hardly treated in not being more consulted and given a more definite place in the arrangement'; yet he previously 'showed no interest in Wallington' and his father is determined 'not to treat him as "an eldest son"; given that, the new arrangement is much the best for George.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

The Master's Lodge, Trinity College, Cambridge. - Encloses a letter [14/169] which he is also sending a copy of to his children and to Aunt Annie [Philips]; expects Charles will tell Bob himself, but thought that since he himself was 'mainly responsible for it being done now and in this way' he would write. Feels that in 'the general ruin that is falling on us all', that handing Wallington over to the N[ationa] T[rust] now, thereby avoiding death duties, is the only way to save it

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

2, Cheyne Gardens, S.W. - Did not telegraph yesterday, as they were 'too uncertain about the life of the little boy [Humphry]'; now both he and Janet are all right; it was a 'very anxious time', and he thought a lot about Bessie, 'expecting... a similar misfortune' [a reference to the early death of her and Bob's daughter Susan?]. Janet was 'very sensible and calm'. Hopes to have good news of Paul.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

The Master's Lodge, Trinity College, Cambridge. - Is 'delighted' to have the other copies of the portrait by Max [Beerbohm of Bob]. Desmond [MacCarthy] is staying this weekend, and is reading H[umphry]'s "Goethe [and the Greeks]" and will review it; he 'admires it', and George is pleased Bob does too. He and Janet are going to Hallington from 19 Dec - 6 Jan, and will stay in the gardener's house: the big house has ceased to be an R.A.F. 'scientific base' and is being turned into a hospital. Looking forward to a visit from Bob next term. Sends Christmas wishes.

Letter from Janet Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Stocks Cottage, Tring. - Thanks Bessie for her letter; was afraid it 'might be so with Nurse Godwin' and is not surprised 'she doesn't want to take on other people's babies at 4 months old'. Is very grateful for Bessie's 'noble offer' to come and stay with Janet herself for part of the time, and would be 'delighted' to have her for as long as she can manage; can easily put up Bob too if he wants. Asks which part of the fortnight from 26 June - 10 July Bessie can come for; will know 'at any rate during those days my baby's bottles will be properly washed!'.

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