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Gardner, Percy (1846-1941) classical archaeologist
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Letter from Alice Gardner to Nora Sidgwick

Refers to having mentioned to Nora her brother 'P[ercy]'s relation with Mr. Sidgwick', and to Nora having asked her if she had any letter 'giving impressions as to his teaching.' Reports that she spoke to her brother on this subject, and that the latter sent to her 'the enclosed' [see 103/44]. With reference to one sentence in it in relation to Henry's treatment of 'the undergraduates who came to the lectures', states that she is certain that her brother did not mean that HS did not pay them enough attention, and that he thought that 'discussion with a quite young man, at that time a very enthusiastic Kantian, might be as good for them as the reception of his own more matured ideas.'

Gardner, Alice (1854-1927) historian

Postcard from Alice Gardner to Nora Sidgwick

Declares that it strikes her 'that the action mentioned' by her brother Percy [see 103/44] 'is all the more generous in that P.G. must have been one of the very few Mor[al] Science men who were not in any way pupils of Dr S[idgwick.' Percy 'went down just after taking his classical degree... and read Philosophy a good deal alone and then with some coaching from Seeley's brother [perhaps Leonard Benton Seeley?] in London'. Declares that Dr Sidgwick showed 'peculiar generosity in this case.'

Gardner, Alice (1854-1927) historian

Letter from Alice Gardner to Nora Sidgwick

Says that she has often felt lately as if she were very lazy 'doing nothing but move about under a real Italian sky, looking at interesting things' while Nora is 'enveloped in work'. Refers to Edith Sharpley, from whom she presumes Nora has heard news of Gardner's visit to Italy. Reports that she had 'a delightful visit to Pompeii', and that her sister and one of her nieces have been there [in Rome] with her for the last week.

States that her brother [Percy Gardner's] lectures are very well attended, but laments the state of the British School in Rome. Expresses her gratitude for the copy of Henry Sidgwick: A Memoir., which she enjoyed reading it very much, and which Percy is reading it now. Would very much like to write a review of it, but fears that she does not have enough influence with any editor to secure its publication. Declares that one feeling that the book inspired in her was the desire for more. Remarks that some of Henry's traits, which were very noticeable to those who knew him less well, seem to be 'kept too much in the background': gives as an example the manner in which he tried to ignore his stammer. Refers also to 'his freedom from conventionality in small things.' Claims that the above all belonged to the characteristic that 'is made, in the Memoir, the key to his whole life: his persistent preference in all things for perfect truthfulness.'

Recalls the 'rather critical occasions' in her life when she had a private talk with Henry, 'which helped in determining [her] subsequent course'. Includes in these occasions her first arrival at Newnham, and recalls that it was Henry who interviewed her and 'who interpreted [her] desire as for the study of Kulturgeschichte', and also when she was unsure whether she should leave Bedford College to come to Newnham. Refers also to having, at Nora's suggestion, consulted him as to whether she should write about John the Scot. Adds that she would have to write at much greater length if she wanted to say in what ways both his teaching and his life as Nora records it are among the greatest possessions she [Gardner] has.

Gardner, Alice (1854-1927) historian

Letter from C.A. Goodhart to Nora Sidgwick

Reports that he has been reading and re-reading Henry Sidgwick: A Memoir; says that it deepens and extends his influence, and is the best assurance that those who knew Henry can have 'of his continued presence and unfailing sympathy.' Recalls that he first became acquainted with Henry in the late 1860s, and states that he writes to draw attention to 'a phase of his work which is not noticed' in the book. States that about that time Henry and others introduced a system of inter-collegiate lectures 'which were of inestimable value to impecunious students.' Refers to his own experience of this arrangement and to the benefits that he derived from it. Mentions the names of several men from whom he received tuition, including Mr Beatson at Pembroke, Henry, Mr Levine, Mr Percy Gardner, Mr [Henry?] Jackson and Mr Marshall. Claims that he owed his first class to Henry's lectures and the papers that he did for him. Refers to The Methods of Ethics, and also to Henry's lectures on metaphysics, Whewell, Hamilton, Bentham, Mill and Kant, and relates how he convinced him on the question of Utilitarianism. Refers also to Henry's stammer, without which, he claims' 'note-taking would have been impossible.'

Goodhart, Charles Alfred (1844-1919) clergyman