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Trevelyan, Mary Katharine (1881–1966), political hostess and voluntary worker, wife of Sir Charles Trevelyan, Bt
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Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Julian is well; he says Wallington is 'a nice warm little house' whereas the Shiffolds is cold. He has gone to Cambo this morning; Charlie arrived yesterday and Mary, who was staying at Wallington, has gone home with him. Hopes Elizabeth's guests [Catherine Abercrombie and her baby?] are well and do not give her trouble. Asks if Robert is returning soon; he will find it dreary where he is if it rains. Sir George is well and very busy; good that his book is done. Graham has made Julian a 'little besom to sweep the leaves with'. Thinks Mrs Evans is good with him, but 'she is a talker'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

British Red Cross Society, First British Ambulance Unit for Italy, Intendenza IIIa Armata, Zona di Guerra. - Thanks Bob for the 'paper re Molly's moves', which he has signed and sent back to Sir Hugh Bell. Glad to hear where Bob was and what he was doing; expects the work of [the Friends War Victims Relief Committee] will 'come in more than ever' during the armistice, whenever that begins, and 'a library if well chosen may be very much to the point'. Sorry to hear about the death of Bass [Sebastian Burtt?] Meyer's brother [Philip?]; if Bob sees Meyer, he should tell him that George's unit 'hope to get the Star lorry on the road again before demobilization': he will understand. George's unit have had a 'quiet year', except for one week in June. He has started writing again, and the 'beauty of the sub Alps and Iuganeans [Euganean Hills]... is in itself a resource'. Notes in a postscript that the unit's base is 'within 2 miles of Petrarch's house' [at Arquà] which is as genuine as [Shakespeare's] house at Stratford, with the 'cat that was in his room when he died' stuffed and mounted over the door of the room.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Sorry that Elizabeth is having so much trouble with Julian; expects he 'likes his old nurse best', and resembles Robert in not being able to 'bear a change'; unlucky that he is also unwell. Elizabeth need not worry about deciding whether they should visit Wallington yet. It is very cold, but the house is warm and comfortable; perhaps the doctor should be asked if the change of air would be good. Hopes C[harles] and M[ary] will cheer her up - they will be 'excited about politics' - and that Elizabeth will be able to keep Nurse Catt a while longer so that things can settle. Sir George is anxious that she should not feel 'bound' to come to Wallington. Sees that '[Bessie's] old Judge is ill, & his old Report coming out!'.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Has looked through three volumes of the "Yellow Book" and agrees with Robert that there is 'a certain collective energy and enthusiasm' which makes all the contributors 'do more vigourously [sic], or at any rate more oddly, what they regard as their ideal'; [Henry] James's two stories are very strong; [Walter] Sickert's illustrations 'most curious - in a way better than Beardsley'. The Charles Adamses, 'a pleasant couple', are staying; he is enthusiastic about going on to Flodden; he is seventy one, and his great grandfather [John Adams] was 'deeply interested in the world' up till the age of ninety. Charles Adams has seen bigger battles than Flodden, and was 'asleep in his saddle during Pickins's [sic: Pickett's Charge] at Gettysburg'. The 'Cambo folk' [Charles and Mary] are coming for lunch, with the [Malcolm?] Macnaghtens and 'all the babies'. In a postscript, notes that he has had another letter from [Theodore] Roosevelt, with 'three new spellings'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Zermatt. - Thanks Elizabeth for her note and telegram; Caroline had written to 'the poor lady'. Glad the concert went well, and hopes next week will be good; Dolmetsch must appreciate Elizabeth playing. Zermatt suits Sir George very well and he is taking 'quite long walks'; they are staying an extra day, going to Martigny on Wednesday, then driving over the Tête Noire to Chamonix. They will spend three days there before travelling home, arriving in London on 25 June. Sir George is going up to Wallington; Caroline asks if she could visit Elizabeth and Robert on the way to Welcombe, bringing Pantlin, who could stay in the village. Glad Elizabeth is comfortable at Gr[osvenor] C[rescent]; hears Mrs Cooper [the cook] is back so hopes Elizabeth will take all her meals at home; she should also use the carriage, as Mary and Janet do. There are quite a few people here, but it must be 'horrible' in season.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Glad they can hope to see Elizabeth; thinks it is the best thing, especially as she is keeping Nurse Catt, which is very good news; the other nurse cannot have been very clever or she would have made friends with [Julian]. Charlie calls him 'a superb little chap'; he and Mary will be glad it is settled. Asks Elizabeth to tell Nurse Catt how glad she is she is staying, and that the north country air will do her good. Asks her to let Maria know when to expect them [at Grosvenor Crescent]; discusses travel arrangements. Sir Charles Dalrymple and his daughter [Alice?] are visiting on the 24th, and some neighbours are coming to dinner, but otherwise they will be quiet. Geordie [George Lowthian Trevelyan] has recovered from chickenpox and the girls show no sign of it yet; they have not been to Wallington so Julian will be safe. Politics is very exciting; was 'very glad the Conference failed'. Elizabeth's Dutch paper has begun to arrive. Sure she has done the best thing about the nurse, even if Mrs Catt only stays a few months. Good for the Liberal party to have the R[ussell] Reas at Tannhurst [sic: Tanhurst]; fears Elizabeth cannot fight the seat this time. Asks Elizabeth in a postscript to send a telegraph with their arrival day, as she may want to go to Newcastle.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Sorry that the journey to Rounton was 'so agitating'. Mary has written to say the wedding went well; Elizabeth's account is amusing. Expects she misses Julian, but they are glad to have him for a little longer at Wallington; he has been playing with his toys then was happy for Hearne [the butler] to carry him upstairs. Hopes Elizabeth and Robert have a good Christmas Day; asks to be remembered to the Enticknaps; hopes Gussie got home safely. Will be nice if Elizabeth comes to fetch Julian on Thursday. Sir George says there is a good review of Mrs [Janet] Ross in the "Nation"; she hopes Robert will lend her the book ["Lives of the early Medici as told in their correspondence"]

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Will write to Jan Hubrecht at once and invite him; sorry M. [Ambrosius?] and Mad. H[ubrecht] are staying for such a short time. Has had interesting letters from Robert about the Chantrey Com[mission]n, [Roger] Fry and so on; he will be glad when Elizabeth comes. C[harles] and M[ary] hope to get into their new house on 8 August; G[eorge] and J[anet] are going to see Aunt Annie [Philips] tomorrow. If Elizabeth thinks Mary can play well enough to accompany her, they can 'make her practice'; it is very kind of Elizabeth to say she will play at a party. Caroline has to organise the Tenant's party. Asks if Elizabeth's subscription to the G[rosvenor] Cr[escent] Club is due; Caroline will give her the money when they meet; believes the Club has changed management.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Sorry the 'pretty girl' [Hylkia Halbertsma, see 46/100] cannot stay with Elizabeth; wonders if she will have more success elsewhere; wonders whether, when Robert is settled with Madame Palumbo, Elizabeth could visit the Grandmonts at Taormina. Wishes she could have heard the concert [organised by Dolmetsch, see 46/100]; asks whether it was an artistic and financial success. Asks how she got on with the Arnolds; he [Ernest Penrose Arnold] 'had his faults' but both Robert and George owe much to him and his school [Wixenford]. The Arthur Severns have been visiting; she was Ruskin's niece [actually second cousin], and they live at Brantwood. Sir Courtenay Ilbert has also been; his daughters [Olive and Jessie] stayed with C[harles] and M[ary], as did F[rancis Dyke-] Acland and H[ilton] Young. George and Janet return to London on Monday; they want Robert and Elizabeth to dine with them and Caroline on 19 October, with a 'little party afterwards'; they could go to the theatre the night before. Amused by the idea of Elizabeth teaching a class; they are lucky to get her. Hopes [Helen] Fry is recovering; 'wretched for her' to be away from home as well.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Relieved all well about the measles; does not think it will spread and is glad the little girl [May Enticknap: see 46/174] is getting better. Would very much like to see Julian; expects he will soon be crawling. Mary goes home tomorrow; she has been very good, and much amused her grandfather, with whom she has long conversations. Sidney Lee stayed last night; the Ernest Trevelyans are coming from Oxford on Sunday. C[harles] and M[ary] cannot come till Sunday morning as it is 'the Ministerial ?Amusement'. She and Sir George will go up to town about the 22nd; she has a ticket for Elizabeth for the concert then. Sends her regards if Mrs Hubrecht [wife of Ambrosius Hubrecht?] is still there; had thought it was 'Mrs Jan' staying with Elizabeth. Glad her son's [Jan or Paul?] expedition is interesting. Hopes Mr Carter recovers soon. Sends love to Robert; hopes 'the musician with the striking name [Benvingut Socias i Mercadé, see 46/174] ' is pleasant. 'What praise of Strauss's new opera ["Elektra"]!'. A postscript saying she is glad 'Patterson succeeded'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Hopes the 'invalid' [Thomas Sturge Moore?] is better and can return home soon, though sure he is comfortable at the Mill House; Mrs Moore seemed 'such a nice creature, with her pretty French manners & sweet face'; sure Elizabeth likes helping her. Keen to hear whether Elizabeth got to Tunbridge [for the Conference, see 11/107]; admire her for having canvassed. She herself has had 'urgent telegrams' about a women's meeting in Horsham today; would be wonderful if Erskine won. Sir George is very pleased at [Theodore] Roosevelt's victory. Sir Charles Dalrymple and his daughter have been staying for a couple of nights. Mary's cousin Blanche Stanley has been staying with her, who has a 'lovely soprano voice' and has been well taught. Mary has also got Charles to sing better; they are away now. Sends love to Robert, asks if he would like his "1001 Gems [of Poetry]" to be sent. Looking forward to the play. Asks if Elizabeth would like to have a box of chrysanthemums sent next week, and whether Mrs [Helen] Fry would like some, or Mrs Moore when they get back.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad the invalid [Thomas Sturge Moore] has recovered, and that Mrs Moore is such a good friend; hopes he is not 'delicate'. Sir George has sent a hare and duck which he shot himself. Caroline sends part of a letter from Miss Jones and some newspaper reports; asks Elizabeth to destroy Miss Jones's note and return the reports to her at 37 Broadwater Down, Tunbridge Wells. Glad Elizabeth enjoyed the Conference [of the Women's Liberal Associations?]; Mrs [Eva?] McClaren is 'bold' and 'uncompromising', but also 'warmhearted... cultivated' and charming. Knows Mrs [Frances] H[eron] Maxwell from the Westminster Women's Liberal Association; her 'appearance is really terrible' but she is a 'very good woman', most energetic, and 'sympathetic with working women'. Mary wrote a paper on land value and read it at the [Women's Liberal Associations] Conference at Sunderland; Caroline is very pleased they are both interested in the work she likes so much. Sure Maria [Springett] will enjoy making Elizabeth comfortable; Aunt Annie will be at Gr[osvenor] Cr[escent] on Friday afternoon. Sir George has been asking how the [building of the new] house is going; perhaps Robert can write about it. Asks when they are going abroad, and whether Elizabeth has found anyone to go with her. Will send flowers on Monday. Hopes Robert's proofs are going well[ for "The Birth of Parsival?]. George's book ["England Under the Stuarts]" is just coming out.

Postcard from Florence Cacciola Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Very glad to hear of the safe arrival of Robert (whmo she calls 'Calverley')'s son Paul - has not been well, or would have written sooner, but is now better. Hopes Elizabeth is 'well and strong again' and that the weather is good so she can get fresh air. Sends love to Mary and Charles and thanks for their letter of 20 December. Has 'never known such an unnatural winter at Taormina': there is 'much sickness - diphtheria, scarlatina, meningitis'. Her husband is well, but worried about her; the servants are 'quiet & satisfactory', the animals are all well. Sends best wishes to Paul for a 'long & happy life, full of health & prosperity'.

Card from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Board of Education embossed card [possibly from Charles Trevelyan, appointed as parliamentary under-secretary]; dated 'Monday. - Molly has been telling them how much better Paul was yesterday; he is very glad to hear it. Read the last half of [Robert's] "Sisyphus" again, aloud to Jan and it read 'capitally'; they both like it all very much. Is giving it to many of his 'literary friends' and hears nothing but praise; he finds some of the metres are too difficult, which is his only complaint.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad to hear Elizabeth is comfortably settled at Florence; hopes she and Bob are enjoying their time with the Berensons; supposes they will reach Ravello around Christmas. Charles and Mary are back from 'ten days in their constituency with meetings every night'. There was a Women's Liberal Association meeting at Cambo on Wednesday; Charles chaired and Miss [Florence?] Balgarnie spoke, and it was an excellent meeting. Charles is now 'first rate' at public speaking, and Mary also can speak 'quite nicely'. Had a letter from Miss Somerville about the Westminster bazaar, which made forty pounds; she said the 'very nice things' which Elizabeth had sent sold quickly. Good to hear that Elizabeth and Robert's [new] house has got on so well; probably good for her to have a quiet time before she has to start thinking about moving, though it is possible to have so much. Caroline herself sometimes feels that at Wallington if she sees no one but Sir George for a week, though he - and Robert - are the 'best of company'. Hopes Elizabeth will come to Welcombe for Easter, when Robert is with his friends [on George Moore's reading holiday]. George is coming to them next week, and they go to Welcombe on 27 December. There is a 'great fuss' at the Grosvenor Cr[escen]t Club: the proprietress seems 'unsatisfactory', while the food and management have been 'very bad'; Caroline had decided to leave before she hear about the row. Julia seems to be the 'centre of it'; Caroline will send Elizabeth her letter. Julia is not 'very delightful or interesting, but she is perfectly respectable & not at all fast!'. Caroline paid Elizabeth's subscription on 17 January, so she had better write a resignation letter before then if she does not want to carry on; it is a great pity, as it 'was really a nice club at one time'. There will be a 'school treat' on Thursday, so she is hoping the mild weather will last. Is reading 'such a pleasant life of Burne Jones by his wife' ["Memorials of Edward Burne-Jones"]. Calls the Pre-Raphaelites 'an innocent high minded set, with all their absurdities'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Hopes Elizabeth is settled at Ravello and having a good Christmas day; expects it will be quiet, as theirs is. Had their 'very mild festivity' last night; George is staying, and C[harles], M[ary], and Mr Fitch came to dinner. They had music after dinner - Mary has greatly improved Charlie's singing - then 'played a letter game'. Most of their packing is done, and they leave [for Welcombe] on Tuesday; George will travel some of the way with them as he is joining Janet at Stocks for a week. The fogs in London, Manchester, Leeds and so on 'quite terrible last week'; hopes they will have gone. Asks if she may use one of Elizabeth's 'supernumeray [sic] silver inkstands' at Welcombe, as she is having a small room set up to use in the morning. George is well; he and Sir George discuss 'their respective works & the treatment of History &c &c &c at length & very amusingly'. Does not think George's book ["England Under the Stuarts"] has 'had a brilliant success', but it has been well reviewed. Asks to be remembered to Madame Palumbo; supposes Mrs Reid is still alive. Has received a postcard of Vesuvius from Heathcote Long so supposes he is somewhere near Naples. Asks if 'the diplomat' is any relation of Elizabeth's.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Hopes that the snow in Italy has melted. Spent one night and '2 busy days' in London; Sir George went up for the day yesterday. Spent that evening with Janet, since George was at a 'review meeting' [for the "Independent Review"?], who is very well and 'enjoys the situation to the full'; approves of her preparations [for the forthcoming birth]. Thinks Charles and Mary are staying at Cambo till the end of the month. Mary has 'thoroughly got up the subject of Taxation of Land Values' and has given several short speeches on it; she has also written a leaflet which Caroline hopes to get printed for the W.L.F. [Women's Liberal Federation]. Good that she can help Charles politically. Wants Elizabeth's advice about pianos: there ought to be one at Welcombe, and she would 'like to change the monster in London!'. Has a room at Welcombe to write in now, so Elizabeth can now have the drawing room to herself to practice in. Expects Meg Booth will arrive [in Italy] soon. Asks if Elizabeth is thinking of going to Taormina this year; hopes the Grandmonts are well. "The Times" is 'so hard up for an argument for the sugar tax that they say it is unhealthy and that people should not eat so much'. A party of neighbours came for lunch recently, and more will come. Has had a 'nice letter' from Mrs Enticknap.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Hotel des Alpes, Mürren. - Arrived yesterday and plan to stay for more than a week; it is a 'wonderful place' though the air is 'rather fatiguing' at first. She will rest today; Sir George is very well and 'walks a great deal'. The electric railway to Interlaken is pleasant and travels through some fine passes. Very sorry to hear from Elizabeth about the Russells; [their separation] is 'surprising and very sad'; sure Russell is 'difficult, & the family are rather uncompromising' but he is 'a quiet good fellow'; does not know her [Alys] well but thought she seemed 'to belong to another "monde"'. Likes to think of Julian almost walking; asked what is settled about the nurses, and whether Mrs Catt is going to the hospital; it is very sad. People must be very anxious about the weather [for the Coronation]; is glad to be 'out of it all'; Mürren is completely quiet, with no road for carriages, and Bob would love it. Glad Julian likes his cart. George says [he and Janet] are going on 12 July to the Lakes, and would like to come to Wallington in September; asks if Elizabeth and Robert could be there for some of that time. Is glad the [Lake] Hunt was a success once more, it is 'a wonderful institution'. Thinks C[harles] and M[ary] will enjoy themselves at the [Coronation] festivities. Sends love to Robert, and asks if Mr [Roger] Fry is coming.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Will be very pleased if Elizabeth brings Julian for a visit. Is going to see Annie from 21- 24 July, though unluckily Charles can come for that weekend so she will miss him; Mary is staying on with the children to look after Sir George; when they leave Julian can have the nursery to himself; can arrange the time for Elizabeth's second visit later, when they hope to see Robert too. Thinks Elizabeth is lucky to get Nurse Withers: it is rare to get two good nurses in succession. [Charles and Mary's] children are well and have 'a very satisfactory governess'. Asks how much help Elizabeth's nurse will need; would need to get extra help to provide the waiting on which Mrs Catt had. The Davidsons only have one young man lodging with them besides Gussie at the moment, so Mrs Enticknap could stay there; Caroline would pay.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Delighted that Elizabeth is 'enjoying the Booths' company'; very sorry that C[harles] Booth is so unwell, as heart problems are hard to deal with. She and Sir George agree with what she says about him: it is 'extraordinary' that he has such a 'knowledge of the working class' and yet 'his conclusions are so vague & formless, & so absolutely unsuited to practical politics'. Thinks something must happen soon at Cheyne Gardens; Janet [due to give birth] is well, but when Caroline took her on a drive yesterday she 'seemed less comfortable'. Charles and Mary are well and come to dine tonight. Politics very interesting: the Government have 'got into another disgraceful mess about Ireland' but obviously 'intend to stay in as long as possible'. She and Sir George went to a Court last night; she had a new grey dress, and Pantlin 'made up [her] last years train with grey chiffon'; they saw many friends and left early. Went to Broadwoods about pianos; they say they pay little for grand pianos since 'no one buys them now', so she thinks they must put up with the size of the piano in London and buy a small upright for Welcombe, in light oak to suit the room; Elizabeth can choose it. Asks if she will return to England much before Easter. Mr Gow [Thomas Gow, a Northumberland neighbour?] is very ill and may die; he is eighty-seven. Has written to Robert about his book ["The Birth of Parsival"?]. Janet likes it and quoted a passage she found beautiful. Annie [Philiips] is coming up this afternoon. Good that Elizabeth and Robert's new house is nearly finished; it has been a 'wonderful winter for building'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - If it suits Elizabeth to come later, will be glad to see her then. Mary is 'laid up' in bed on Dr [Ethel?] Williams' advice, though Caroline does not think 'anything will go wrong'. Has been sitting with her, and yesterday looked after 'a picnic party of Women Liberals' for her. Discusses the question of nurses; thinks that Mrs Catt should take a longer holiday. Hopes Elizabeth's 'suspicions' [of pregnancy] are true; she must not worry, and take care. She would like Mrs Catt to come back herself, but thinks Booa [Mary Prestwich] is doubtful. Mrs Davidson says that Mrs Enticknap is coming soon [to visit Gussie]. A postscript on a separate sheet says she is sending Elizabeth a blouse from Interlaken; has been to visit Mary and hopes she will be well in a few days; does hope Elizabeth is right [about pregnancy] as it would be 'good for Julian and everyone'; recommends again that Elizabeth should put off the decision about nurses to see whether Nurse Catt really is better.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Elizabeth will have heard that George and Janet's baby was born on Sunday morning. Janet stayed well despite the delay, and all went well for the birth. The baby is 'plump & peaceful & quite pretty', with grey eyes and lots of brown hair; Sir George went to see her yesterday and seemed pleased. George gazes at her 'in quite a sentimental way'. Caroline has not yet seen Janet, but will soon, and she seems to be comfortable; the baby is to be called Mary Caroline after her grandmothers. Has not asked 'what religious denomination she is to be brought up in!!'. Aunt Margaret [Holland] has returned from a visit to Brighton and seems fairly well again; Caroline thinks she is unwise to go to Court on Friday to see Margaret Smith and 'two other grand daughters' presented. Sends love to Mary [Booth] if she has arrived. Asks when Elizabeth and Robert will return to England. She and Sir George have been to see Bernard Shaw's "John Bull ['s Other Island]"; found it 'amusing' but not his best play. Charles and Mary are well. The Government is 'getting more & more discredited'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - The photographs [of Julian] are 'delightful'. They have been very anxious about Mary [who has suffered a miscarriage]; Dr Williams stayed two nights 'as there was danger of Haemerrage [sic] and then things would not come away entirely', but she is recovering now; it is very unfortunate and she hopes Mary 'will be more careful another time'. Is sure Elizabeth is 'not running the risks she has done'; hopes she is well and can confirm her news [that she is pregnant]. Hugo Bell has been visiting, and has seen [Donald] Tovey recently, who was 'very full of the opera ["The Bride of Dionysus"]; glad Tovey is working hard on it. George plans to visit soon 'by way of a walk'. '[G]reatly excited about politics'; wishes the '[constitutional] crisis were over'. Asks if Margaret V[aughan] Williams would like to visit towards the end of Elizabeth's stay at Wallington.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Glad that Elizabeth enjoyed the Petersfield Festival, and that Robert could be there some of the time; nice for her to meet 'Miss Davies & other musical people'. Will be 'very interesting at Dorking' [the Leith Hill Music Festival?]; asks to hear how things go. Amused to think of Elizabeth and Robert driving a horse; expects the one chosen was very safe. Busy with the meetings for the next three days, and expects to be very hot: hopes 'the debates will not be very excited!'. Charles and Mary have been away, but she has seen G[eorge], J[anet], and 'Little M[ary]'; they are soon going to the country, though have not been able to let their house. They say the review [of "The Birth of Parsival"?] and feared Robert would be 'vexed'; it does though 'speak very respectfully of him as a writer' and only criticises the subject. Longman [the publisher] is advertising it well, also for America. A postscript confirms they will put Elizabeth up on the 16th.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Glad that Mrs Enticknap got back safely; wanted her to stay till today but she did not want to travel without an escort; glad she was 'satisfied with Gussie'. Will send some fruit tomorrow and hopes it arrives in good condition; it worked for Janet, but the post is quicker there. Mary is recovering [after her miscarriage], but must stay in bed until the end of the week; she is 'very cheerful, & wants company', so it is lucky a cousin has come to stay, as Caroline found it very tiring visiting her every day. George came for three days; he is 'fairly cheerful now, but looks sadly older, & has times of silence and depression [following the death of his son Theo]'; was meeting Janet at Ellargreen [?]. Delighted to hear that Elizabeth's 'news [that she is pregnant]' is true; will be 'so good for Julian'. Knows she is always careful; Mary was 'very unwise' and it is kindest not to say too much about it. Sorry to hear that Mrs Catt still doubts she is strong enough to come as a nurse. Excited and uneasy about politics; it is a 'very serious crisis'. Hopes Mr [Donald] Tovey will soon be settled and that they have a good time with him. Going to a garden party at Hallington today. Loves the little photograph of Julian.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Elizabeth must be finding the heat very trying, as she is. Mary is recovering well [after her miscarriage]; C[harles] is coming this week. She and Booa think Elizabeth has made the best decision about the nurses, though it is very sad that Mrs Catt is not well enough to return. Thinks Julian may talk when he is sharing the day nursery with Mary and Humphry; Janet says Humphry 'chatters incessantly'. Asks her to thank Robert for sending the poem; is sorry that Robert has been worried about the opera ["The Bride of Dionysus"]; Hugo Bell reported that [Donald] Tovey was very interested in his work on it. Tovey must be a very pleasant guest; sends her regards. Glad Elizabeth has the Reas as neighbours; it 'makes so much difference to have one house where they are not just local'. Is not giving a party for her neighbours this year, due to Molly's indisposition, so is asking them to small tea parties. The E[xhibition] is on Saturday, and the tenants party on the 24th. Mrs Rea's puzzle was very difficult, and she had to come and help Sir George with it; it was 'so ugly too' but interesting. They are 'shocked and grieved' by the strikes and riots; finds it hard to understand; does not quite agree with Sir George about it. Glad the Peers gave way, or there would have been a 'great reaction'; the crisis is now over and the Tories divided, so something must be done. Sir George has inflammation they think must be gout in his finger. Glad the fruit arrived in decent condition.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Robert has just left; they have much enjoyed his visit and he was 'most helpful & cheerful with the guests'. Sir George is taking a few days holiday [from his book] so was delighted to have Robert to talk to. The weather was fine, and the [neighbours at the Welcombe parties] 'enjoyed themselves... thoroughly'. Has just had the piano moved into the drawing room, where it looks very nice; Mary is coming to stay for a fortnight in July so will 'have the benefit of it'; has heard how Elizabeth enjoyed playing with Lady Bell. The move to Wallington is on Monday; Booa [Mary Prestwich] is going to stay with some relatives for a week tomorrow, so there is much to arrange this morning. Elizabeth must be very busy, but it will be a 'pleasant excitement' to arrange their belongings in the new house.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Glad Elizabeth spends her evenings at Leith Hill Place; sure it is helpful to them [the Vaughan Williams family] and more cheerful for her; hopes that Robert will return soon and Julian will 'greet him affectionately'. Pauline has had influenza, but is recovering, and nobody else seems to have caught it; Mary was fortunately at home, and Charles away. They have decided to leave a week earlier, as Sir George is worried about strikes; he also wants a change, having finished his book. The school treat therefore needs to be put forward and she has a lot to do in a short time. They plan to spend the 7-18 December in London, then go to Welcombe. Miss [Lily?] Noble visited for a night; seems to know Elizabeth's friends the Oranjes well and like them; her engagement is off 'in quite a friendly happy way'. Says Elizabeth should 'get a shawl for "Hannah Priscilla"'; is sure she will like it; Julian can have a coat next year if Elizabeth likes, but not a fur coat 'as no one should walk in one'. Sends a diary for next year, and hopes 'pleasant things may be put down in it'.

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