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Mazzini, Giuseppe (1805–1872), Italian nationalist leader
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Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Darjeeling. - They have been here three nights, and are leaving this afternoon; they have had fairly good weather, and have 'seen the mountains quite well'. Originally enclosing a photograph, though this gives 'very little idea'; the scenery is 'much vaster than anything in Europe'. They will be met at Sara [?] on the Ganges by 'young [Nagendranath?] Ganguli', son-in-law of one of the Tagores, who will take them in his steam launch to the Tagore country house, where he is an estate manager. They will spend a night there, the next in Calcutta, then start south on 8 January, reaching Madras on the 10th; they plan to stay about a week, before spending around three weeks seeing South India and Ceylon [Sri Lanka] and leaving Columbo for Java on 7 or 8 February. Very glad to hear his family are all well; expects his parents are still at Wallington, but that Julian has gone home. Is 'amusing' himself learning Persian in order to be able to read the poetry; it is 'not a difficult language, except for the alphabet'. Glad to hear that Robin Mayor is 'really married' [to Katherine Beatrice Meinertzhagen]. Does not seem to be much news lately from Europe; supposes that 'the Turks will come to terms soon' [First Balkan War]; the [British] government seems 'to be getting on quite well now'. They just missed 'Montague' [sic: Edwin Samuel Montagu, secretary of state for India] at Benares; he seems to have 'made a fairly good impression' at Calcutta, and at least 'seems anxious to learn'.

Hears the Christmas tree was 'a great success'. Bessie says Julian's Nannie is 'fairly cheerful', which is good; of course she thinks Booa [Mary Prestwich] 'spoils Julian'. Bessie thinks Julian is getting on well and is 'usually quite easy to manage'. He and Dickinson have had a 'very interesting time' at Calcutta; not likely to meet 'so many clever and entertaining Indians elsewhere'. Will be glad to leave India and get to Java. Their plans about China and Japan are still 'unsettled'. He wants to get back early in May if possible. Everyone in Calcutta has read George's 'Garibaldi books', but he doubts this 'will produce a Bengali Garabaldi [sic]'. 'Mazini [sic: Mazzini] is more of their kind... the young men seem to have a great admiration of him'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Reports that he has read Myers' article [on Mazzini] and found it very interesting. Refers to a particular passage in relation to 'M's views on income-tax' being used as a justification for calling him an assassin, and suggests that this charge actually rested on a specific accusation of having prompted an assassination attempt on Charles Albert [King of Sardinia]. Reports that his sister 'writes with serenity - even with a bright intensity of resignation [after the death of her eldest son, Martin]', but he claims to be 'half afraid of a reaction'; does not know what to write to her and finds his own 'ignorance as to το μέλλον [what is to come] appalling'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Observes that he has left more than one of her letters unanswered. Reports that he has been seeing friends chiefly 'and walking to and fro in a great city.' Relates that he has been working at an essay for a volume, and suggests that an article of his may appear 'in next Macmillan['s Magazine]'. Fears that his work will hardly pay for his expenses. Reports that he has been inquiring into Spiritualism, but that it has not come to much. Declares that he can 'get to see and hear very astounding things in the dark with people [he does] not know', but can never get conditions to satisfy him.

Claims that he can never get enough time to read at the Museum, and although he feels well, he cannot get enough sleep. Is considering writing an essay for the Quarterly Review the following term, but does not know if it will be put in. Reports that he has plenty of work on his hands, as he has 'an entirely new subject to prepare' for the following term. Feels that he could write literature if only his mind was 'less chaotic'.

Remarks that London is a stimulating place, and that one meets stimulating people there, including Mazzini, whom he had met some nights before at dinner, and who 'attacked' him about Spiritualism, and 'bore down upon [him] with such a current of clear eager argument'; was 'overwhelmed', as people usually either treat it as a joke or have' nothing to say but the shallowest commonplace'.

Reports that he is staying in lodgings between two visits; has been staying with Symonds, whom he thinks his mother knows, as he has been at Rugby; describes him as 'also stimulating, though... a great invalid'. He is also going to stay with Cowell.

States that he will certainly come and see his mother at Wellington College: Edward [Benson] has asked him to come and that he has promised to do so. Cannot remember when, and asks her to find out when Edward is to go away. Remarks that he would just as soon come in the holidays as in the school-time, 'except for seeing [Henry Weston?] Eve.' Sends his love to all.

With regard to books, claims that he has not read any lately. States that the 'Cornhill of July is good: there is Matthew Arnold on culture, and an article on the Alps 'which makes one want to go there'.