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Marshall, Elizabeth Anne (1847-1940) cousin of Henry Sidgwick, known as Annie
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Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Remarks that he has not heard from her in a long time, and reports that lately he has been lying on his sofa 'from inflammation of the ancle [sic].' States that it is better now. Reports that he found 'a tolerable suitable house' for his young ladies [a hostel for female students]. States that he then went to stay with the [Thomas Fowell?] Buxtons on the borders of Epping Forest, and then to London, where he found 'portentous heat and equally portentous hayfever.' Claims to hate London in heat. Reports that he was introduced to Miss Octavia Hill, whom he has long wanted to meet, ever since he read an article of hers in Macmillan's on her work among the poor in the East of London. Calls her 'a very interesting woman', and vows that if he ever takes 'a vow of asceticism' and gives away all his goods 'to feed the poor', he will give them to her, 'as the person who is likely to make them do - the least harm'. He then went to see Mrs Clough, and made his final arrangements with Miss Clough for their proceedings the following term. Spent 'the suspensive day between the rejection of the Army Bill by the Lords and Gladstone's "coup d'état" [the Royal Warrant on Purchase] ' with Trevelyan. The latter 'had had notice given him privately of what the Ministry was going to do and was in proportionately good spirits.' Reports that he saw his friend Patterson, 'who was also cheerful as a translation of a Hungarian story by him is to appear in the Cornhill.' Since London he has been in Cambridge, 'trying to get a little reading done', but complains that he cannot shake off his laziness. Informs her that [his cousin] Annie 'is passed in P.E' [political economy]. Asks for her news, and whether she will be staying by herself at Rugby during any part of the vacation, as he may come down there.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to F.W.H. Myers

Regrets that he did not see him the previous day - owing to the Marshalls [Stephen and Annie?] not having come back - as he would have liked 'to talk over Mrs Fay etc.' Is considering calling on Crookes on Monday evening to tell him what has happened and to see what he says. Asks Myers for his opinion on the matter. Suggests that it may be better to wait until they can find out through Yorke or otherwise 'something more of the relations of R and N.' Announces that he shall be at 4 Carlton Gardens again on Monday. Offers to send back [ ] book.

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Reports that Minnie 'prospers daily', and describes her progress over the last few days. Adds that the baby [E. F. Benson] is also doing well. Relates that they received news by that morning's post of Edward from Carmarthen, from where he was to go on to Tenby, and then to Pembroke, Milford, and St Davids. Reports that Arthur wrote from the [ ] of the R[ ], 'where he and his friends Kitchener and Mr. Robertson betook themselves to escape the heat of Lucerne', and announces that she writes to him today at Grindelwald.

States that William went to Oxford the previous Wednesday, and that that day 'he goes on to the Raikes [home of Robert Hodgson Sidgwick and family]. She will be glad to hear of Henry's going out of London. Reports that Annie Sidgwick wrote to Minnie some days previously, and that she is very happy that William is going to see them, and wonders if he will bring Henry; she is also delighted with Henry's article on Mr [M] Arnold in Macmillan's Magazine 'but seeing, as she says, that his article on "Culture and its Enemies" is far less "cosy" than money', she asks why Henry chooses that to come down upon him for. Mentions that Minnie would like a letter from him.

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879), mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Refers to her recent visit to Cambridge, which she fully appreciated and very much enjoyed. Describes having been received by Dr Lightfoot after Henry was gone on the Saturday, and their meeting with Mr [Robert] Burn and Mr [Ralph] Somerset. Describes how they were entertained by 'Professor Sedgewick' [sic], who was 'as merry as ever, full of kindness....' Refers also to their visits to Mrs Prescott, Mrs Millar, and to Mr Somerset's rooms.

Reports that after they left Cambridge Annie [Sidgwick?] and she parted at King's Cross, and presumes that the former is now at Hastings. States that the 'London Expedition' with Henry's Aunt Henrietta was a failure because the heat caused Mary Sidgwick to be ill, and she came home to Rugby the previous day, while Henrietta went to Wellington College. Wonders if Henry is angry with her for having brought away 'the manuscripts', and assures him that they are safe and that she will send them back if he desires to have them. Reports on her rose tree, and claims that Arthur looks well. Admits that she does not feel up to going to 'the Schoolhouse Lunch and speeches that day' and has decided to stay at home. Reports that she met Henry's old friend Edmund T[ ] at the station some days previously, who asked after Henry. Explains tht the books 'were all taken back with the bag and the key the man at the Porter's Lodge took.'

Sidgwick, Mary (d 1879), mother of Henry Sidgwick

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Writes to say that he is pleased with her news [of his cousin Annie's engagement]. States that his recollections of Stephen Marshall 'are altogether pleasant', and asks why she should be surprised. Thinks that the marriage seems to be 'in every way most suitable.' Declares that he is very busy in various ways, and is occupied with the investigation of Spiritualism. Undertakes to send the Examiner if he can find it. Claims that he is very well and as he is still 'taking a holiday from hard brain-work', nothing disagrees with him.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from Broadstairs]:- Reports that he is settled in the same house with Isabel; he arrived the previous Friday, and has secured rooms there until Saturday 3 July. Intends to go to London early on 5 July, and they are going to being a new series of experiments on 6 July. Will be in London until 20 July, and is considering paying one or two visits until about the middle of August, when he plans to settle down in Cambridge. Reports that [Broadstairs] 'seems very salubrious', and that Nevil [his nephew] appears to be in excellent health and spirits. Declares that Isabel is very kind and does her best to make him comfortable. Reports that his book has sold as well as [Alexander?] Macmillan had expected, and a second edition is being discussed. Reports that two-hundred and fifty copies have gone to the United States, and he sends her the enclosed card [not included] to prove that is fame is 'More Than European!'

Is at present 'in a lazy state working languidly at an article [he has] to write for a new journal on Philosophy [Mind]'. Intends to be relatively idle for a few months, and does not feel inclined to work on a new book just yet. Is glad that [his cousin] Anne's wedding went off well. Reports that his uncle Robert wrote to him to say that [his cousin] Chris was considering coming to Cambridge to study Moral Sciences, and asks if she has heard anything about this. Does not feel sure that it is a wise scheme. Supposes that he has been stimulated by Stephen Marshall's example, 'and perhaps thinks home will be dull without Annie'. Hopes that she has a good visit at Lincoln [to the Bensons]. Informs her that 'H P. goes back to London early on the 5th July' and tells her to write to him before that.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Sent from Whittingehame, A. Balfour's house in Lothian]:- He and Nora were very busy up to the end of the previous year, until they escaped to Prestonkirk on New Year's Eve. They arrived in Cambridge on 26 December, on Thursday morning they were completing their arrangements for the Conference of Schoolmistresses on the following day, and their friends arrived that evening 'and educational talk began lasting without intermission till Friday evening...' On Saturday he began to prepare his answers for the Cambridge University Commissioners, and finished them on Monday morning, before his journey to Scotland.

Reports on the conference itself, which 'made up a compact and business-like meeting at the Townhall.' States that he was impressed with the schoolmistresses, who 'said what they had to say in a clear, short, practical way'. They 'fixed a limit of ten minutes for the speeches, but the only speaker who showed the least desire to exceed it was a Man..' Mentions that among the speeches made was one by Professor John Mayor. A short paragraph about the conference was sent to the newspapers, and got into the Times. Among those who came were James Wilson from Rugby with his sister Annie, who is head of a school at Grantham; Annie Marshall from Leeds, Professor Green from Oxford 'with his professorial honours fresh upon him', and Eve 'who used to be at Wellington College. States that Arthur was not able to come because Charlotte was not well enough to be left.

Reports that they have 'delightful weather' there in Prestonkirk, and that his brothers-in-law are all assembled. Claims that he has got the burden of his article pretty much off his mind. Describes the 'lovely winter view' from his window. Sends on Nora's love. Adds that they did not hear any political secrets at Hatfield, but reports that Myers, whom they had seen in London 'had seen Dizzy at Windsor Castle and reports that he bore a remarkably swaggering and triumphant aspect', and they are afraid that 'that Hebrew has been brewing some ill for his step-native land!'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Thanks her for her letter. Is sorry that she takes 'so gloomy a view of [his sister] Mary's state.' Agrees that her mental state is unusual. Asks when the school reopens, and states that he would be very glad to come to Rugby for a night or two; suggests that he could come at the same time as William and Isabel. Asks her to tell Annie Sidgwick, or his aunt Mary Jane, 'that she could not possibly get more than a 3rd class according to [their] regulations'. Is glad to hear of [E.A.] Scott's reinstatement. Mentions that it has not taken place yet, but does not suppose that 'H. H[ayman]' can gain anything by interposing obstacles now.' Remarks that the latter appears to have got into very strained relations with the Board, and speculates as to Hayman's possible tactics in the matter. Concludes that 'if Rugby can once get rid of him, it does not matter much what he says'. Sends his love to [Mary's] children.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson

Announces that he is in the midst of scenery [in Carnarvon], 'which is not first-rate but very pleasing...', and comments on its similarity to the Lakes. Predicts that he shall enjoy himself much, as they have 'much exhilarating good fellowship and good talk at breakfast and in the evening: George Trevelyan, especially, being a well-spring of both.' States that he intends to be there for at least a week, returning to London probably early in September. Claims that he is behind with his work, and thinks that when the holiday is over, he shall have to work hard on till Christmas.

Asks her to thank their mother for her letter [101/176], which he intends to answer soon. Refers to [his cousin] Annie's remark as 'discriminative', and explains that the reason he chose to comment on 'that particular essay of Arnold's was not because it was the most impudent, but because it seemed the most complete and decisive enumeration of his theory of life.' States that he was glad to get Arthur's address, but does not think he will be sending a letter to him in Switzerland. Is glad to hear of her progress. Encloses 'a little poem' [not included], which he cut out of a magazine, and also 'a German effusion' of his [not included]. Advises her to get hold of Rückert's Selected works if she ever feels inclined to break new ground in German poetry. [Incomplete?]

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his sister Mary "Minnie" Benson

States that he has been very busy of late 'about the enclosed' [not included]. Reports that Annie [Sidgwick, their cousin] did not do well in Political Economy. Explains that he gave her paper to a friend of his who has examined in the subject, and he decided that she would have been let through if she had been an undergraduate. Asks her tell Edward that he is to breakfast with Henry on the following Sunday, and adds that '[a]ll sorts of swells are coming to meet him - Canons, Regius Professors, University Librarians, Public Orators etc....'

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mary "Minnie" Benson

Announces that Mrs Offley [Carey] has forgotten to send him a [ghost] story, which she had undertaken to do, and asks Minnie to remind her. To facilitate matters, he sends the story in the form in which it has already been communicated to them [not included], and refers to certain elements for which he desires evidence. Reports that he and Nora have been visiting relations in Yorkshire, and that they received many enquiries in relation to Minnie. Reports that they were all very cordial. They stayed chiefly at the Raikes [home of Robert Hodgson Sidgwick], and also with the Stephen Marshalls, and went over to Riddlesden [home of Sarah Hannah Sidgwick] to dine. Remarks that 'Aunt Sidgwick' was 'much changed (since /71!) but wonderfully well...for her age.'

Hopes that Minnie is enjoying her 'Park'. Sends his and Nora's love to all, and asks Minnie to remind Arthur [Benson?] that he thought he could get some stories for them from the Dean of Windsor. Adds that his uncle informed him of the earliest forms of the name Sidgwick - from 1379. Remarks on the presence of an 'l', as in 'Syggleiswyk', and 'Seglewyk', and states that a version from two centuries later is the one he is thinking of adopting: 'Seeggeswyke'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Reports that his nerves have got a little depressed 'not by hard work, but by too continuous a strain'; thinks hard work is healthy 'if one can enjoy leisure', but that 'What is trying is a Care perpetually haunting one, of whatever sort it may be'. Announces that his work will end about 6 June, and hopes that she may be able to come to visit him around that time, 'or else when the interesting events (boat processions, flower shows etc...) take place'. Reports that Cambridge is 'charming' at that time, and hopes that it may continue so. Claims that his rooms 'are those of an anchorite.'

Asks her view on 'the great "Spiritual" case'. States that he is writing for the summing up. Feels that he has been very neglectful of her. Reports that he has not been very well, and fears breaking down before the end of the term. Tells her that the week of the May examinations, from Saturday 6 to Saturday 13 June would be the best for a visit from her. States however that he will be very busy, that 'Cambridge will be frightfully full and it will be difficult to find lodgings.' Confirms that there will be balls on that week, and suggests that she might bring Annie [his cousin]. Reports that Lord Russell is there, and comments that 'he looks a very inferior sort of great man.'