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Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Lewes Ho[use], Lewes. - Has been to Paris about a Renoir ["Madame Charpentier et ses enfants"] which he has succeeded in purchasing for the [Metropolitan] Museum, which 'is quite secret'. This is the only time he has left Helen, who 'wants someone to walk with her all day', but hopes to get away for a few days and to 'look at the various houses'. Their own landlord is to turn them out at Christmas so they must find something, and it is 'evident that H[elen] ought to be in the country'. Encourages Bob to read Ferrero's "La Grandeur et Décadence du Rome", though he has the London Library's copy at the moment. Adds in a postscript that he is up for election at the Reform Club on 18 Apr; asks Bob to mention this to his father.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Queenstown. On board S. S. "Celtic". - Did not try for the concert, then could not get a berth [on a crossing to the US] till yesterday, but had a week full of Museum [Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York] business. Will try on the crossing to write a 'real letter' about Spain. Asks Trevelyan to look Helen up: they both feel bad about parting again so soon.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

The Reform Club. - Looks forward to seeing Trevelyan in town, though he cannot make the Joachim [Joachim Memorial Concert]. Jokes about his title [at the Metropolitan Museum of Art]: 'I'm European adviser... (to the whole United States of course)'. The children are very well; he goes to see Helen often and can't feel hopeless yet though Savage is pessimistic. Is glad Paul is well and hopes Bessie is too. Met "the dear [Julius?] Röntgen" who 'plays divinely'.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

L.B.S.C.R [London, Brighton and South Coast Railway?]. - Apologises for not writing: has been very tired and Helen 'in the difficult exalted mood'. Is going to Paris for two days, 'museuming' with a Trustee [of the Metropolitan Museum of Art]. Is sorry not to have seen Trevelyan; hopes Helen's phase will pass soon as it is 'far more trying than the depression'. Asks to see Trevelyan's "Sisyphus". The Frys have taken a house at Guildford for nine months, then hopes their own will be built. Hopes Paul is well again.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Chantry Dene, Guildford. - Wishes he could get to the concert: he is an admirer of 'orange jelly' [Jelly Arányi], whom he heard at Haslemere a while ago, but he has promised to take over MacColl's lectures at the Slade this term and travelling to see Helen at Crowborough takes up much time. Asks Trevelyan to apologise to Miss Weisse. Goes Paris after his lecture on Friday to meet Burroughs and see things for the [Metropolitan] Museum. Helen seems to be doing well, but is anxious to return home. His show [at the Carfax Gallery] a qualified success, with rather poor notices of his new style but a good review from Claude Phillips. Hopes Bessie is better for their time in Holland [after the death of the Trevelyans' son Paul].

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Chantry Dene, Guildford. - Possible arrangements for meeting after a trip to Paris [for the Metropolitan Museum of Art]. Goldie [Dickinson] wants to visit: asks if Trevelyan can send him a wire; suggests bringing Logan [Pearsall Smith] over on Tuesday so Fry can show them the new house. Thinks Trevelyan will like it: the neighbourhood regard it as 'the most hideous thing ever produced'. Will try to go to some of the concerts. Has been with Helen at Bourton-on-the-Water and has left her there; Mr Bowhay still has hope, but she 'still despises the whole world... if once that could be overcome she would be almost completely well.'

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - They 'rejoice with' Robert at Roger Fry's success [his appointment as Curator of Paintings at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York]; glad that Robert will not lose his friend but see so much of him when he comes to England. Thinks Fry's father [Sir Edward] did a 'very fine thing' in returning money [part of his remuneration, to the Metropolitan Water Board] the other day; the 'disinterestedness' it demonstrated has much declined recently. Glad that Campbell-Bannerman's government has taken the step of 'revindicating honesty and public spirit'; was 'disgraceful' of Balfour to reverse the last Liberal government's veto on [ministers] keeping directorships. Agrees with Robert in looking forward to the parliamentary session, especially to the Budget. Sir George and Caroline want to give Robert and Elizabeth a 'minute interest in the Budget' by paying them fifty pounds twice a year instead of making good the income tax on their allowance. Went to the British Museum on Saturday and found a 'Liberal atmosphere' everywhere in London; Welby and Sir Courtenay Ilbert 'seemed to breathe very freely in it'. Has finished Catullus and will read the "[Appendix] Virgiliana" today.

Draft or copy letter from Elizabeth Trevelyan to Virginia Woolf

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Bob thought Virginia might like to have 'some additional memories of Helen Fry' [to help with the writing of the biography of Roger Fry], since she perhaps saw her 'from a slightly different angle'. Saw a 'great deal' of Helen when the Frys' children were born and they lived in Dorking, while the Trevelyans were 'two miles away at Westcott'. She was friendly, but they 'never became intimate then', and Bessie 'always felt slightly in awe of her mysterious aloofness'. Their relationship 'suddenly seemed to change when the return of her illness approached', when Helen 'began to talk more intimately about the children', one day visiting Bessie 'to talk about her fear that the doctor and other people would think she was not a good enough mother to the children or wife to Roger'; believes 'this anxiety was a constant trouble'. Saw her 'more rarely' when they moved to London and Guildford. The Frys stayed at the Shiffolds when 'Roger had been disappointed about the post in America [atthe Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York]'; was clear Helen 'took this morbidly to heart', and seemed to Bessie to think 'she herself had been at fault'. Even when their relationship was 'more easy and confidential', Bessie 'still felt her charm as aloof and mysterious'. Goldie Dickinson used to talk about Helen to Bessie 'years afterward', and though he was 'perhaps, their closest friend' and Helen had been 'very fond of him', he always felt Helen 'so mysterious' and wondered 'what she really thought and felt'.