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Sickert, Oswald Valentine (1871-1923) writer and salesman
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Letter from Marie Busch to R. C. Trevelyan

Hindhead. - Mrs Sickert and Oswald think she might be able to do the German translation of Trevelyan's play ["The Bride of Dionysus"] which [Donald] Tovey has set to music; she is doubtful, since the work would need to be done by someone who was an experienced writer as well as musician. Would be able to judge better if she could read the play. Mrs Sickert suggests they should meet at Pembroke Lodge; she could make next Tuesday, Thursday or Friday.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3 Hare Court, Inner Temple. - Apologises for not saying goodbye properly on the boat; hopes the stewardess looked after her, that she had a good crossing, and found everyone well at home. Asks her to thank Louisa [Hubrecht, who was staying with her uncle and aunt]. His hotel was very comfortable; had a good journey to London, reading more of "Arne" [by Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson?]. Is glad to return to his 'studious habits', but even more so to think that soon she will share them with him. Has enjoyed his day at the British Museum. Had supper with the Sickerts and a 'long talk with Oswald', one of the 'nicest' of his friends whom he thinks she will like very much. Will probably go to Highgate to see [Thomas Sturge] Moore tomorrow, then to Dorking next day. Has not yet seen [Charles] Sanger, who must be out for the evening. Has been to Curry & Paxton, who will have them [spectacles for Ambro Hubrecht?] ready in about a week. Is paying Luzac [?]. Saw his parents this morning; his father has almost recovered. Read the Gospel of Nicodemus and some [Matteo?] Bandello stories at the British Museum. Expects she will soon be discussing their marriage date with her uncle and explaining his parents' plans to travel over. Will write to Sir Henry Howard [the British ambassador to the Netherlands] when the date is settled. Sanger has just been telling the story of his friend Robertson's love affair with an American girl who has just died; Sanger is going to Greece, and has not had 'his bad headaches' recently. Was sent a guinea by the "Manchester Guardian" [for his letter on the Amalfi landslip]. Frank Holland has sent a letter [17/145] promising him a set of Anatole France [as a wedding present]; Bob thinks what he has read of France 'very good'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Has received the conditions of marriage from Bessie's uncle, which seem all right and which he will discuss with his father at the end of the week. Is not sure about coming over early in April [sic: May], as her uncle seems to expect; in his 'last month of freedom' he would like to have a few friends such as Phelps, Sickert, and MacCarthy to stay, and to go with the Frys to Roundhurst to see the bluebells. Also wants to get more work done. Appreciates that these reasons 'look a bit selfish', and that her uncle and aunt want to see them together; there will also be business to complete. Will certainly be there for her birthday, and if Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht] is coming on the 17th or 18th would come a few days before that. Bessie must say if she does not think this early enough. Asks whether the catalogue for the beds is at Grosvenor Crescent; asks what else must be bought, and whether the pillows will fit their pillow cases. Has written to Thuring [sic: Henry Turing] and Sir Henry [Howard]. Asks about the tie and footwear he should wear for the wedding; has a pair he wore for Roger [Fry]'s wedding he thinks are all right. The Frys are away for a holiday; when they return soon he will settle on colours for the bedroom and send them. Asks if she has thought about their return crossing. His mother does not think his father will want to see him for a few days.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3 Hare Court, Inner Temple, London E.C. - Glad to hear that [Joseph] Joachim was so nice to her; hopes she also enjoyed her evening with the Piersons. Has talked to his father, who has convinced him that they should invite Sir Henry Howard to the wedding, as a relative; admits that it would be strange not to do so in England. Told his father it may cause difficulties with the Grandmonts; but he replied that politics should not enter into the matter. In a way it would be a slight to his father, since he wishes it, not to invite them; he would in that case not come over. Thinks that the Howards would not be 'much in the way' at the wedding, especially as his brothers and parents will be there; does not think him 'a bad fellow, and she, though dull, was quite harmless'; will not deny it would be pleasanter if they did not come. More serious if the Grandmonts really object; understands their feelings, though thinks them 'wrong and unreasonable'; they are among Bessie's best friends and good friends of his too, and it is through them that he and Bessie know each other; would be a great pity if they did not come. Does not think the fact her uncle, who will send the invitations, does not know the Howards is 'essential'. She will have to explain the situation to him; then the Grandmonts should probably be told as soon as possible so that they can make a decision. He or his father could write to her uncle to explain if she prefers.

The marriage conditions are all right; both he and his father will write to her uncle about them. Is going to Cambridge tomorrow and will see Tom Moore; wants to read him the two finished acts of the play. Will probably 'take wings' on Saturday evening: become an 'angel' and 'cease to be an active member of the Society of Apostles'. [Oswald?] Sickert is probably coming to Dorking the Sunday after; has worked well recently, and a few visitors will not make much difference. Sanger is back and seems well again, from the little Bob has seen of him. Has been to the tailors and it is hard to find material of the kind she wants; sends some more patterns, which he thinks will look lighter when made up and were lighter than the ones he wore for Roger [Fry's] wedding. The travelling clock which the servants have given them is very good; there was a note with it in Booa [Mary Prestwich]'s handwriting, which he copies out. Wants to write them a thank-you note, but is unsure how to address it; had better ask his mother.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3 Hare Court, Inner Temple, London E.C. - It is very good of her to see the matter [his father's wish that Sir Henry Howard and his wife be invited to the wedding] the way she does; not possible for 'these sort of things' to be ideal; does not think the Howards will really spoil much, and hopes the Grandmonts will not be 'unreasonable' and come too. Had to tell his father of the Grandmonts' objections or he would been angry when he called on Sir Henry at the Hague and found he had not been invited. His father does not know Sir Henry well, but his aunt [Alice] Dugdale does, and in general his family 'are on very good terms with the Howards of Corby, though not very closely related'. His relations would very likely be offended if Sir Henry were not invited; does not particularly care about Aunt Alice, but his father does, and he does care for his Aunt Margaret and does not know how she would react. Sanger is engaged, and therefore quite recovered. True that she [Dora Pease] 'behaved so badly to him' and there is a doubt whether she is really in love with him, but Bob is optimistic; [Goldsworthy Lowes] Dickinson knows more and is reassuring; Bob has not yet seen Roger. Expects Sanger's wedding will be in July or August; wonders whether Bessie will like Dora, as people often do not and she has plenty of faults; yet she is not heartless. Splendid that Sanger is 'so miraculously cured'. Thinks he will go to Dorking on Thursday; MacCarthy and Sickert are coming to visit. Will write more later of what he did in Cambridge. Curious about Lily H[odgkin]; did know she was there [Dresden] and had just written to thank her for returning a book he lent her two years ago. Is glad to have her new photos, though does not think them very good.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Is sure things will improve and she must not worry; as his mother says, 'it is really rather... a storm in a teacup'; it is nothing to compare to the happiness that will soon be theirs. Though he often fails 'through weakness and idleness', his life 'has been passionately devoted... to the best and most beautiful things which [his] imagination can attain to' and hers will be as well; lists all that will be good in their lives. Will write again to the consul [Henry Turing] if he does not hear from him today, since they need to know whether he can come on the 7th [June]; has also not heard from Sir Henry Howard, through whom he sent the letter; will send the second letter direct to Turing. There has been some delay at the lawyers about the settlements; has written to tell them to speed up. Bessie should tell him if he need do anything else regarding the marriage conditions her uncle sent. Thinks he may come over on 12 or 13 June. Meta Smith, his aunt Margaret's daughter, has sent a silver inkstand, and Mrs Holman Hunt a piece of Japanese silk. Had a good time at Cambridge: saw Mrs McTaggart, a 'nice quiet sort of person'; Tom Moore read his play and thinks it should come out well though he has pointed out 'some serious faults and suggested alterations'; Moore is going to give him a lot of his woodcuts, and has begun an Epithalamium for them, though since he has not got on with it says they should defer the wedding for a month. Asks what he should do about the Apostles' dinner; it will be 'quite exceptional this year', Harcourt is president and everyone will come; would very much like to go but will not break their honeymoon if she does not wish it. Very keen to go to the lakes eventually, but they could spend a few days before the dinner at Blackdown among his 'old haunts'; Mrs Enticknap's aunt lives in a farmhouse a mile from Roundhurst, which would be perfect. Hopes [Alice and Herbert] Jones' visit has been a success. [Desmond] MacCarthy is coming tomorrow for a few days and [Oswald?] Sickert on Sunday for the day. Will see [the Frys] this evening and discuss colours for the walls. Thinks [Charles] Sanger is very happy; is not entirely sure [about the marriage], since 'Dora has behaved so strangely', but everything seems to be coming right. Has ben reading Emerson on poetry and imagination and thinks it 'amazingly fine and right'. Most people think "Pères et enfants [Fathers and Sons]" is Turgenev's best book; he himself does not like the ending but finds the book charming; has heard the French translation, the only one he has read, is better than the German or English one - Sickert says so and he is half-German. Has ordered the trousers, and found the catalogue so will order the beds and so on next week. Glad Bessie got on with her socialist sister [Theodora]. has just had a note from Sir Henry Howard saying 7 June will suit Turing; she should let her uncle know. Does not think there will be further delay with the legal papers.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3, Hare Court, Inner Temple. - Is glad that matters are resolving themselves, even if not in an ideal way; does not think her uncle 'had any right' to speak of them as he did, but since he has thereby found a way out of the difficulty, they must not mind, though it was he who caused the difficulty and did not write directly to Bob's father about his objections [to inviting the Howards to the wedding]. Thinks Bessie should not have written to his father instead of showing the letter to her family at once, but it was an understandable mistake. His mother was very sympathetic and wise about everything this morning. A shame Ambro [Hubrecht] altered the letter, but he might have been the one to 'bring him to reason'. He and his family do not want the religious marriage, neither does she, so there is no need for it; 'absurd' to suggest that Sir H[enry Howard] cares; his father will probably 'settle that difficulty in his letter'. There was a small delay with the legal papers, which are being sent today; would perhaps be best for him to stay in England until they are signed. Will probably go to Roundhurst with the Frys for a night on Friday. Must not take her uncle being hard on them too much to heart; he is wrong, so she can laugh at him privately; 'it is a great thing to laugh at people; it is much better than being bitter'. His father is very relieved and now wants to come to the wedding very much. Had a good time with MacCarthy and [Oswald?] Sickert, though he was anxious about Bessie. Is glad she likes the idea of going to Haslemere first. Thinks he told her that the [Apostles'] dinner is in London, not Cambridge, and they might stay the night there before going North. Berenson and some of his other friends have got together to buy the clavichord painted by Mrs Fry. He likes it very much 'as a work of art', as he likes almost all of her work; also as an instrument, though not as much as the Frys and Dolmetsch do. Will send her the list of contributors soon. The Holman Hunts have sent a 'charming piece of old Japanese print'. Will bring over his frock coat, new blue suit and new country suit; does not think he needs his London clothes, which are 'very old and shabby'. Needs a new topper [top hat]. Asks whether he should cross to Flushing or the Hoek.

Adds a postscript saying that he has been to a 'very amusing farce with [Henry Francis?] Previté', with 'lots of very good things in it about falling in love' which interested him more than would have been the case in 'the old days'. It was by [George] Bernard Shaw ["You Never Can Tell"?], whom Bessie may not have heard of. Will write tonight to Berenson and some of his 'clavichord friends'; his letter to the servants apparently pleased them very much. Sanger is 'at this moment writing to Dora on the same table'.

Letter from Marie Busch to R. C. Trevelyan

33 Ossington Street, Bayswater. - Returns Trevelyan's "Ode": does not think 'Jimmy' has 'done it very nicely'; she has changed a few words at the beginning to keep the alcaic stanza. Loved doing it, and says Trevelyan's poetry almost translates itself; he 'ought to have been a German poet'. Is delighted that he is still keen on German and continues to read and learn it by heart; they should do some more some day. Is working on the short History of Poland from the 'Aigle Blanc' ["Poland and the Polish Nation", by Drogoslaw?]; Mr Reade lets her read it to him which is a great help. Hopes Trevelyan had a good time in Scotland. The Sickerts are keeping very well; Oswald writes 'cheerful and amusing letters mostly about Japanese plays'; thinks he said he was sending Trevelyan some picture postcards of actors.

Letter from Arthur Waley to R. C. Trevelyan

Department of Prints and Drawings, British Museum, London, W.C.1 - Thanks Bob for [his translations of] "Theocritus", the letter about "[The Tale of] Genji" - the errata have now been incorporated into a second, US-only printing, as the 'demand is far greater than here - and his 'little book about the future of poetry ["Thamyris"].' Likes the [Theocritus] epigrams 'very much', but thinks the meter Bob uses for the "Idylls" goes 'too slowly'; however, the 'best judges' do not agree with him and he is probably 'eccentric' about this. Thinks that in the pamphlet ["Thamyris"] Bob does not discuss the things he himself sees as 'straws showing which way the wind will blow': sees 'European poetry' as a whole, with it being impossible only to discuss English, and believes that '[m]odern French poetry (Apollinaire, Reverdy, Tzara even) indicates what is going to happen as regards outward forms'. Regarding Oswald [Sickert's] writings, he himself does not know the Woolfs, 'save for one or two casual meetings'.

Letter from Arthur Waley to R. C. Trevelyan

British Museum, London, W.C.1. - Has just heard that Oswald Sickert has lost his job with the Encyclopaedia Britannica and will be in England in about a fortnight looking for work. Corrects an impression given by his last letter: only met Adrian [Stephen: see 17/25] once and liked him, does not know him well. Asks if Bob could translate Aeschylus's "Prometheus" for the Art Theatre" as requested by [Vera ] Donnet; thinks his way of doing the chorus would 'work very well' for recitation. Was greatly bored by the first performance by the Art Theatre [George Farquhar's "The Beaux' Stratagem"]: everybody 'connected with it is completely Philistine', and he does not think that any good will come of it, though it will be no worse than 'the Stage Society, Pioneers, Plough, Bel Espoir, Paddington Players, Malleson's Mimes or anything of the rest'.

Has arranged to publish his next book ["More Translations from the Chinese"] with Allen and Unwin; Constable's [who published his first book] is 'a nuisance to get to'. [Eugene] Morice has died of illness at Salonika and his bookshop [in Museum Street] is for sale; would be 'great fun' to run it, but he is afraid there is not 'enough sustenance in it for Oswald'. Has translated about thirty more poems of Po Chu-I for the new book, but may 'weed them out a bit', as well as a new version of Ou-yang Hsiu's "Autumn Dirge'. [Gordon] Luce's poems have been 'an appalling blow'; liked some of them at first, but now 'hate[s] them all'. Asks if anyone has seen [Charles] Vildrac and whether he is translating any more of Po Chu-I into French. Does not think he has seen Roger Fry since Bob went away. The Dickinsons [Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson and his two sisters] are soon to move into the upper storey at 13 Hanover Terrace.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Edward Marsh

5 Barton St (on headed notepaper for National Liberal Club, Whitehall Place, S.W.). - T. T. [Thomas Tettrell Phelps?] says that he is getting tickets for Bob and Marsh to see "His Excellency" [comic opera with libretto by W. S. Gilbert] if he can, otherwise they must trust to the 'tender mercies of his dramatic judgment'. Bob went last night to the Empire with the Sandilands [Harold and James?], saw 'Ivette' [Yvette Guilbert], and 'was enrolled among her vassals and servitors'. T.T. was 'not quite sufficiently magnetised', claiming 'ignorance of the language', but the rest of them could also 'not understand much of it'. [Oswald?] Sickert talked about 'buying the Empire for his friends next Saturday' for the matinee; advises Marsh to go if he can; he would himself but will have to play [rugby] football that afternoon. Has exams next Monday until Thursday, 'unlike false Sextus' [he quotes Macauley] he is in 'an agony of apprehension' that they should 'fail to be the last'. Saw MacT [Jack McTaggart] last Sunday, who thought Marsh's 'critique splendid'; Bob hopes Marsh has 'not made an enemy of Iphigeneia after all', who was not mentioned in [William?] Archer's piece in the "Pall Mall" at all.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Edward Marsh

Hotel Scapolatielli, Corpo di Cava (written on printed notepaper for the Hôtel de Londres, Gênes - crossed out). - Marsh's letter gave Bob much pleasure, since the 'stupid people at Naples' have not yet sent his first on; his address 'hints fascinating suggestions of rustic English scenery, and milk drunk and mild-maids beflirted in dairies'. Asks if Marsh is alone, or whether this letter is '"solus ad solum", as Flaubert used to write to Maxime Ducamp'. Read [William?] Archer's review of the plays produced by the Independent Theatre [Society] in the "Pall Mall Budget", and supposes it was 'in some slight degree inspired by' Marsh's; hopes this 'wonderful pale-faced black-haired [man: Lugné-Poe, see 15/322]' will still be in London when he returns at the end of the month; asks if it was Titian's portrait of Ariosto Marsh was reminded of. Has read Maeterlinck's "Intruse"; did not feel anything strongly for the writer, but would not like to have written the play: did not think the 'poetical or romantic element to which realism was totally sacrificed... was not quite good enough', that Maeterlink was 'not the right man to do it well, but that he could imaging 'a real poet doing something very wonderful in that line'. Glad Oswald [Sickert] 'has seen the last of those Beautiful Englanders' ["Beautiful Britain", published by the Werner Company]; remembers Marsh talking about Sickert's second novel a while ago and thought he had said it was finished, so asks whether this is a third. Asks whether [Stanley] Makower's book is out yet.

Marsh seems 'to have been going the round of our distinguished men pretty thoroughly'; makes Bob 'writhe with envy to read your account; would particularly like to see [Robert] Bridges, and means to make Roger [Fry], Bridges' nephew, take him one day. Has a book of Bridges' verse with him here, which is 'very readable and at times very beautiful'; Fry is 'enthusiastic' about him, and reads Bob passages aloud from "Prometheus [the Firegiver]"; Bob thinks 'a calmness and gentleness of tone and harmony about him... seems to make him a sort of painters poet'; hopes Marsh was 'not badly shown up' for his 'neglect' of Bridges' recent books. A man called [Henry Charles] Beeching lives with Bridges [he in the Rectory at Yattendon, Bridges in the manor house there; Beeching married Bridge's niece] and 'has just published a volume of milky poetry for which Roger has done a frontispiece' ["In a Garden and Other Poems"]; Roger says they quarrel with each other 'off and on in a mild chronic sort of way'. Asks whether Marsh saw Beeching.

Is living an 'ideal sort of life here'; describes his daily routine of exercise, study and meals; he eats omelettes, risotto, 'some wonderful things they call fritelli', for which he gives instructions and states his intention to continue making them in England. His work is 'just as mysterious' to himself as it is to Marsh; does not have the 'faintest idea what it is going to turn out' as; the plot is a 'puzzle' to him, the style is he knows 'vicious and unnatural as a rule' though he hopes it is good sometimes, and the important thing is to get it finished. Has the greatest difficulty finding names for his characters; his hero is called Benedict, 'an awfull name... which mercifully shortens into Bendy'. Badly wants a name for 'a sort of Jim Stephen who has not gone mad' but has achieved nothing due to 'an incorrigible laziness and want of enterprise'; he is in danger of losing his wife to the hero. Bob was just creating a character called Paul who was turning out 'without my intending it, uncommonly like you'; Marsh's letter has made him realise with 'horror' what he was doing and he may have to take Paul out. The character is engaged to a very charming girl who is like someone Bob knows. Hopes to be back in England in about three weeks; intends to 'plunge into an incredible carreer of gluttony [sic] and Pantegruelizing'.

Letter from Oswald Valentine Sickert to R. C. Trevelyan

12 Pembroke Gardens, Kensington, W. - Has been wanting to ask Trevelyan's opinion about starting a weekly magazine [the "Cambridge Observer"]; hears from [Eddie] Marsh that he is optimistic. Wishes he had been in [Arthur?] Tansley's room on the last day of term, when there was an 'air of keenness'. The plan is for a serious magazine, with 'no conventional fun about proginses & bedders & Newhamites"; admires Carr B. very much but thinks he is well represented already while 'more serious people' are not. Problem with finding a good editor; feels a committee would solve this problem, though he knows Trevelyan does not agree; discusses how it might work. The paper would consist of: remarks on events; reviews; poetry or a story; a political or philosophical essay; 'an article on the Town by a Townee'; Oxford correspondence; athletics; Newnham & Girton. The town correspondent is to be Mrs Rye, a 'very hard-working clever Liberal' and a member of the Board of Guardians, whom Trevelyan's brother knows. Hoping to get [Cyril Mowbray?] Wells to write on athletics. Is sending a prospectus to Tansley, [Bertrand] Russell and [Charles] Sanger, who are very keen, and hopes to distribute this (with their corrections) on the first day of term with the paper following the week after. Thinks Palmer will do the printing.

Letter from Edward Marsh to R. C. Trevelyan

Holly Lodge, Richmond Park, S.W. - Writes to tell Bob the 'awful news' that his mother died 'quite suddenly last night at dinner'; they had known 'there was danger', but had no idea of 'the end coming so soon', since she had 'been extraordinarily well & happy lately'. She had 'expected & wished to die very suddenly', and since she was unconscious from the start of the seizure, all was over in five minutes, and they were 'all with her and happy together' he thinks 'it happened as nicely as it ever could have both for her and us'. Bob 'always seemed to understand her so well', and he was one of the friends she was fondest of, with Oswald [Sickert], Reggie [?] or Maurice [Baring?]. Marsh and his mother had been 'such particular friends lately': she knew 'all about' him, they had not quarrelled for a long time, and he had of course not as spent as much time with her for years. Wonders if Bob saw he had come second in the Home Civil [Service examinations]; is very glad his mother knew, and that it was settled he would choose the Colonial Office. Only came home the day before yesterday; his visit to the Balfours 'didn't come off' so he had been staying with the Lyttons for ten days; it is a 'blessing' he came in time. Asks Bob to visit him if he is in London.

Postcard from Oswald Valentine Sickert to R. C. Trevelyan

Postmarked London W.; addressed to Trevelyan at Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Delighted to get Trevelyan's letter; apologises for taking it for granted that Trevelyan as 'a member of the coffee club' would not object to an undertaking [the "Cambridge Observer", see 5/32] decided upon in his absence. Wishes Tansley, Russell, and Sanger were in London to discuss the business side of the paper.

Letter from Edward Marsh to R. C. Trevelyan

Grimsby Farm, Long Lane, Coldash, Newbury. - Hopes Trevy has received the letter he wrote to Naples, otherwise he will think Marsh 'rather a beast'. Glad Corpo di Cava was not snowed under, since it has turned out to be 'so delightful'; he himself would have 'preferred Capri for the sake of Tiberius' [see 15/318]. Has just got away from London and finished his first day of work here; his 'flesh crept to such a degree' when he woke on Monday night and started to think about his tripos [examinations] that it 'must have moved on about an inch all round'. Stayed in London a little longer than he should have done because of a 'superior French company' who performed [Ibsen's] "Rosmersholm" and "Master Builder" and a play by Maeterlinck under the direction of M. [Aurélien-François-Marie] Lugné -Poé who 'seems to be a descendant of Edgar Poe'. He is 'a very beautiful man with a pale face & black hair', and reminds Marsh of a 'portrait of some poet', perhaps Poe himself; he 'acts very respectably' and played the Master Builder as 'an American with a straggling beard & a drunken complexion' and 'quite revolutionized' Marsh's idea of the part, since 'the rather vulgar arrogant manner he put on in certain parts' made the character seem more consistent than 'the suavity of Lewis Waller'. Asks if Trevy has ever read Maeterlinck, as it is 'useless to try and explain what he's like' if not; in the 'mixture of great simplicity with an entire rejection of realism' he thinks it goes back to 'the Burne Jones & Morris kind of thing'. Sat next to William Archer, who was 'very nice' to him. Saw many friends at the Ibsen plays: [Erskine] Childers, Crompton [Llewelyn Davies], Gerald Duckworth, J[ohn] Waldegrave, 'the Babe' [William Haynes Smith?] etc. Thinks the Independent Theatre must be 'the worst managed concern in the world': the performances usually begin late 'after the curtain has gone up two or three times, to encourage the audience. You're never safe from the irruption of a cat in the most moving scenes', the actors miss their cues, or the curtain does not go down at the end of the act. The man who is called the Acting Manager [Charles Hoppe] is 'the greatest crook [he] ever met with in a responsible position', who seems unable to sell tickets without asking for assistance and did not even know how many acts there were in "Rosmersholm". Marsh took the Verralls to that play; comments on Arthur Verrall's reaction to theatre: 'he never is, or lays himself out to be, in the least moved by a play' but responds to 'the cleverness or stupidity with which it is written'.

Very glad that George [Trevelyan] got his scholarship, though there was no doubt he and Buxton would; 'very hard luck on [Ralph] Wedgwood. Went to see [Charles] Sanger yesterday in his new rooms at Hare Court. No-one has heard 'anything of [Bertrand] Russell for some time'. Only saw Oswald [Sickert], who had influenza, not serious, once; he has just got 'free from the Werner Company, which has used up the Beauties of Britain, & gone on to Paris [ie, finished publishing "Beautiful Britain]'; hopes he will have time for his novel now. [Maurice] Baring took Marsh to supper with Edmund Gosse on Sunday: a 'most amusing man', whose conversation is 'described in Stevenson's essay on conversation ["Talk and Talkers"] under the name of Purcell. He was in the teakettle mood'. Met [Henry] Harland, the editor of the "Yellow Book" there; thought him 'an awful little man', but 'on getting accustomed to his manner' next day he thought him 'like-able on the whole'. Hopes to go to supper next Sunday with 'the even more distinguished [Robert] Bridges', though he has not read his recent works so 'feels rather ill-equipped'. Met John Davidson briefly recently; he 'seemed a genial and light hearted little man, with a nice Scotch accent'.

Letter from Edward Marsh to R. C. Trevelyan

Grimsby Farm, Long Lane, Coldash, Newbury. - Since, 'like Alice [in Wonderland]' he always takes 'a great interest in questions of eating and drinking', he is worried that Trevy is under-eating, unless risotto is 'very comprehensive and satisfying', like the dish described [in Aristophanes' "Ecclesiazusae/Assemblywomen" in a long compound word of which he quotes the beginning. Other than that Trevy seems to be having a 'perfect time', much better than he is himself. Wants very much to see Trevy's work; tells him to 'leave Paul as he is' [see 15/274] or just change the name so he will not recognise him; expects the book will be 'uncommon good'. Oswald [Sickert] nearly finished his book at Christmas, but did nothing more between then and Easter, as he was too busy with "Beautiful B[retain": published by the Werner Company]; he says a great deal work needs still to be done on it. [Stanley] Makower's book ["The Mirror of Music"] should be out soon after Easter. The 'great literary event' has been [Arthur] Verrall's "Euripides the Rationalist"; does not think he has ever read 'anything so clever'; will not say anything about it as it would spoil it, and it seems 'perfectly convincing'. Has been 'getting on very well with [Robert] Bridges': went with him to Oxford for a day last week; he seems 'the biggest man I've ever known anything of, perhaps equal with [William Gunion?] Rutherford'; cannot think of anyone else so 'thoroughly serious, thoroughly humorous, and thoroughly consistent', except perhaps Sickert who does not seem to be 'exactly "great" at present', though may be at forty. Bridges is bringing out an edition of Keats soon which will, for example see 'plain "Endymion" as an allegory". They went to the Bodleian, which is 'a delightful place'; Lady Shelley has recently given them 'a fine collection of Shelley MSS etc'. Roger [Fry] is coming to Yattendon soon after Easter, but unfortunately Marsh will have left by then. The 'great thing about Maeterlinck is the sound'; "L'Intruse" was a 'complete failure on the stage'; "Pelléas et Mélisande" 'delightful to listen to'; afraid the 'beautiful M. Lugné Poë' 'is gone for good, and won't come back, the theatre was so dreadfully empty' though the 'decent critics' were all in favour has not seen [William] Archer's articles, but Shaw 'praised the company highly' who has been in Fiesole, will soon go 'for a sail down the Adriatic', and return to England at the end of April. Asks if Trevy has seen the reports of Russell's brother [Frank]'s case; believes it will be settled on Tuesday week; thinks [Russell's wife] 'the Countess and her mother exposed themselves pretty fully'.

Heard from 'dear [Arthur] Shipley this morning, he's in solitary splendour at Cambridge'. Asks if Shipley is Trevy's 'idea of Horace', as he is Marsh's own, both physically and in character. Has also had a 'very gay letter from T. T. [Phelps?], furious' with Trevy for writing twice to Marsh and not to him. Has heard from 'the Seatollerites': George [Trevelyan] and [George] Moore both wrote last Sunday and the party seems to have been a success up to then. Has been 'working very hard' himself, but does not think he is getting on and worries about his Tripos [examinations]; the only reading he is doing apart from revision is de Quincey, of whom he is becoming 'very fond'. Thought the murder Trevy told him about at Wallington, '[William] Winter's murder [i.e., that committed by Winter]' was in "Murder as a Fine Art [de Quincey's "Murder Considered as one of the Fine Arts"]', but read that this morning and there is nothing about it there; asks where Trevy 'got all the details'.

Letter from Oswald Valentine Sickert to R. C. Trevelyan

12 Pembroke Gardens, Kensington, W. - The Index [to the "Encyclopaedia Britannica" ?] is not yet finished; has been reading proofs for the last fortnight; B-G and M-Z are still unread and proof-reading is more like editing. Does not think that the work will last longer, and hopes to get away towards the end of February, but cannot hope to get further than Venice. 'The Sicilian dream was a pleasant one': would have been 'charming' to see Trevelyan there. Is glad Trevelyan is reading [Richardson's] "Clarissa"; hopes he will go on to "Sir Charles Grandison". Has been reading the "Aeneid". Sends thanks from his mother and asks to be remembered to Mrs Trevelyan.

Letter from Oswald Valentine Sickert to R. C. Trevelyan

13, Hanover Terrace, W. - Has ordered a couple of copies of the poem, which sounds delightful from Goldie [Dickinson]'s account. The latest news of Stanley [Makower] 'astonishing and splendid': he is gaining weight and his temperature back to normal; his brother-in-law, visiting from Switzerland, agreed that the illness was the 'fatal one' [tuberculosis?] diagnosed by the English doctors, but thought more should be done, so he is being treated from Zurich. Going to Dieppe tomorrow with his mother, Leonhard and Robert to Dieppe. Lengthy postscript: has read and much enjoyed [Forster's] "Howard's End", but was a little disappointed with [Bennett's] "Clayhanger" and "Old Wives' Tale"; had previously much enjoyed Bennett's short story ["The Death of Simon Fuge"]. Is reading a 'charming' book given to him by Michel Bréal, his "Pour Mieux Connaître Homère".

Letter from Oswald Valentine Sickert to R. C. Trevelyan

Rock Hall, Uckfield, Sussex. - Thanks Trevelyan for his invitation; extraordinarily, they are out of town this weekend, and will be again next Saturday. Sickert's wife plays twice a year in Daniel [?] Young's orchestra at Letchworth. Is glad the weekends with Miss Busch at Pembroke Gardens [working on Marie Busch's German translation of Trevelyan and Tovey's "The Bride of Dionysus"] are going well.

Letter from Oswald Valentine Sickert to R. C. Trevelyan

The Encyclopædia Britannica, 125 High Holborn, London, W.C. - Expects Trevelyan is right, but is sorry that he does not want to write the Poetry article [for the Encyclopædia] as he would have been 'definite' in his treatment. Would be very good if [Lascelles] Abercrombie were to take it on; asks for his address so that he can write and suggest the sort of article needed.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Thanks Robert for "Thamyris [or, Is There a Future for Poetry?]"; had not remembered Sicket's [sic; Osward Sickert] death, which must have been a 'very real loss' to Robert. Has read the allusions to and quotations of Macaulay in [Robert's translation of] "Theocritus". Much appreciated Robert's birthday letter. He and Caroline are 'as fortunately situated as people of [their] time of life can be, and [they] fully appreciate it'; great age is very different to what is anticipated, as one 'feels like the same person as ever, in a body that every week seems less an less to belong to one'. Does not 'believe, or wish to believe, in its [emphasised] resurrection"'. Postscript saying it is 'very interesting having a Kingsman in the family' [was there a prospect of George Lowthian going to King's College, Cambridge rather than Trinity as he eventually did?].

Letter from Oswald Valentine Sickert to R. C. Trevelyan

Palaza de Oriente, 8, principal, Apartado 847, Madrid. - If Trevelyan wants something different, will not get it closer than in Spain; the country towns are 'the most attractive imaginable'; he must stay in Madrid with Sickert, who has three bedrooms, a bathroom and sitting room looking out 'on the prettiest place in Madrid'; will add to the change that he does not know Spanish; will only be warm if he goes south, but will probably be sunny. 'Nothing nice in Madrid but the pictures in the Prado' and friends. Tells him to come soon.

Letter from Oswald Valentine Sickert to R. C. Trevelyan

Madrid, Palaza de Oriente, 8, pral. der, Apartado 847, - Has not been to the apartado since Trevelyan left, but 'the good Mr. Angus' has been twice a day, and Sickert cannot explain 'the hush in correspondence addressed to you and.. the ebb in the tide of Manchester Guardians'. The flat has 'lost some of its style' since Trevelyan left: they 'eat off a table cloth and so never see any news'. Have seen Mrs [Alys?] Russell. They only go to lunch at the Universal, and for theatre, the Argentinita. Did not find [Manuel Bartolomé ?] Cossio boring when they went there, but they have only been once. Mrs Jimenes is a 'dear', she ought to be in Malaga with her husband but is still here with influenza. Has not seen Menendez [Ramón Menéndez Pidal] since Trevelyan left, but he gives Angus a lesson every day. Reports on the progress of the various strikes. The new Minister of War [José Villalba Riquelme] says he will dissolve the Juntas Militares, which Sickert has heard before. Has read only a little Quijote, which he likes better and better. Has had a card from Don Julio [Álvarez del Vayo] in Berlin; recognised his first article from its first word, 'Reinhardt', which might be expected from 'such a theatre-maniac' though it was another Reinhardt [probably therefore not the director, Max]. Ocaña met [Montefiore?] Follick at the club and formed a low opinion of him for thinking Lucretius was Greek. Hopes the lessons suit Julian. His wife 'has reached the advanced stage of not being able to listen to any music', and they have not yet found the Flamenco music Arthur [Waley] talks about, though Duran believes it exists somewhere. Parsifal is on at the Real, would go if a stall cost fifty centimos. A film of [Jacinto] Benevente's is being produced next week; knows Trevelyan claims never to have heard of 'the most famous contemporary Spanish man of letters'. Has an 'extra-ordinary feeling of satisfaction & gratification' when he thinks of Arthur being there [at the British Museum].

Letter from Oswald Valentine Sickert to R. C. Trevelyan

Diccionario Enciclopedico Hispano Americano, Fernanflor, 6 - Madrid - Apartado 847. - Very pleased Trevelyan has send him his Lucretius, and has much enjoyed reading it, especially as he has been reading 'a very competent book which accords modern scientific theories with Genesis'; praises the translation. Apologises for not replying to Trevelyan's letter of 5 June; is coming to the conclusion that he is 'not inordinately egoistic nor singularly selfish, but... a pig'. Since his wife went home he has 'lived off Duran' at the office 'where he is unusually competent', at lunch, and sitting outside for coffee; Alcalá, where they sit, is currently being resurfaced in an inefficient way, which elicits Duran's irritation, he believes communist government will solve such problems. Suspension of "El Sol" newspaper for refusing to either reduce its size or change its cost, as ordered by 'the hopeless Dato', who is premier again. Is surprised at the Spanish people's lack of interest or judgment in political affairs; they should not have allowed [Joaquin] Sánchez de Toca to be driven out of power by 'military intrigues'. Troubles in Barcelona. Goes to see dancing whenever he can, but the best dancer, Amarandina [?] comes on at midnight, so he has only seen her twice. Argentinita and Raquel Meller are in Buenos Aires, everyone else at San Sebastian. Ricardo Baeza is in London writing for "El Sol"; he managed the company which produced "La importancia de llamarse Ernesto" [Wilde's "Importance of Being Earnest". Cancha [?], the 'funny man' of 'El Sol', is also in London. Bagarria [sic: Lluís Bagaria i Bou ?] is in Toledo, 'talking 23 & painting 1 hour of the 24'. Brilleas has been going to the Cantabrian coast for a month, but Echevarría the painter, who was to accompany him, went to see his father for his birthday at the end of July and has not returned. Mrs [Luis] Araquistáin and Mrs Don Julio [Álvarez del Vayo] are in Switzerland; Don Julio is in Warsaw if he has left Berlin. Tells Trevelyan to write 'lots of good poetry quickly': his grandfather's advice to his father was 'mahl gut und schnell'.

Letter from Oswald Valentine Sickert to R. C. Trevelyan

Diccionario Enciclopedico Hispano Americano, Fernanflor, 6 - Madrid - Apartado 847. - Asks Trevelyan if he can look out of a young Chinese friend of his, F. P. Ling, who has recently come to London and is currently staying at the Chinese Legation. They worked together for a year in Shanghai; Ling is very young, affectionate and clever. Does not know what 'overlay of bright & vague Americanism' he might have acquired during his year in the States; Sickert feels it is wrong that so many Chinese look back with affection to America rather than England. Don Julio [Álvarez del Vayo] has returned to Madrid with his wife, 'very full of Bolshevik propaganda in Germany' but unsure how their methods would work in Spain; Duran is still 'a staunch believer in violence wherever & whenever', but fortunately, since Sickert does not know how he would manage without him, this resolution 'is somewhat in abeyance here'. The Liberal leaders totally insipid: they not been heard of since Dato called a new election early next year. Supposes that one reason for the Liberals' failure is that though they 'want things for other people - for Irish, Indians & working men... they have not for a generation & more wanted anything for themselves' and would therefore be content, 'selfishly & personally' with a regime they do not approve of. Sorry Trevelyan has, at least for the moment, put aside his work in which a young man went through 'a wonderful medley of adventures... embracing, like the encyclopaedia, the whole range of human experience.' Excitement in Madrid as Catalina Bárcena is returning to perform "Pigmalion" [sic: Shaw's "Pygmalion"]; does not know if Trevelyan remembers her from the Eslava [theatre]; says Margarita Xirqu is the only other actor worth talking about. Argentinita not yet back from the Argentine. [Ramón] Menéndez has suddenly returned from Toulouse: he does not like the French, which Sickert believes is generally the case with Spaniards. Ocaña is studying for a consular exam so Sickert has not seen him for months: cannot imagine a worse consul. Would like to see Cossio again: liked him and did not find him a bore. His wife has been reading "Howards End', the latest book by Pio Baroja, "Sensualidad Pervertida" and three new Russian grammars by Fowler; she liked "Howards End" as much as ever, and has always admired Forster. Sickert himself did read Corneille in the past, but he was either too young or 'not up to him'. Hopes to see Trevelyan's Swedish friend. Sends regards to Trevelyan's wife; his own enjoyed the Hague very much when she was on a conference in Flanders 'under false pretences'; says he cannot forgive [Walter] Jackson for not having a Dutch encyclopaedia instead of a Spanish one.

Letter from Oswald Valentine Sickert to R. C. Trevelyan

Apartado 847. - Has seen Pedredo [?] and told him Trevelyan does not want "España" any more. As for Trevelyan's offer to send books, and comments on 'what [he] should, or ought, to do and think of them', the suggestion of Tchekoff's letters was a good one, as Sickert got them for Durán for Christmas. He found them in the German bookshop. Durán will not know 'how unsympathetic her [Constance Garnett's?] translations are', or she may have improved; Sickert did not like her Turgenev, who he thinks the best Russian novelist. Don Julio [Álvarez del Vayo] and Luisa have returned to Berlin; he is back with "El Sol". Has finished his sale of the Diccionario and is trying to get on with a prospectus of 'a Geography in 20 volumes' but is feeling too lazy; this letter 'has been going on for days and days'. Saw Benavente's 'chef d'oeuvre', "Los Intereses Creados", which was 'very strange'; discusses the theatre and mime, including on the Japanese stage, at length. New parliament just assembling, so there is a 'pack of motor cars' outside the office; 'curious that it occurs to no Spanish politician to make bids for popularity'.

Postcard from Oswald Valentine Sickert to R. C. Trevelyan

Apartado 847. - Asks for a recommendation of a book on Latin prosody, and also what good things have been written on the other secret about poetry - the imagination...', perhaps by Bradley. Also asks if there is anything recent or 'more general book about rhythm' by any of those corresponding in the "Times Literary Supplement" and whether he would understand it.

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