Showing 15 results

Archival description
Jones, Alice Margaret (b 1875) sister of Herbert Gresford Jones
Print preview View:

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Penmenner House, The Lizard, Cornwall. - Likes the sketch of Bessie's wedding costume; quite Watteau-esque as she says. He is 'no judge of silks' but the piece she sends looks good; encloses samples of cloth for his trousers and for a tweed suit and asks her opinion. Will probably stay in Cornwall till next Wednesday; [George] Moore and MacCarthy are the only others there at the moment; [G.H.?] Hardy left yesterday, and he hopes both 'Llewelyn Davieses' [Crompton and Theodore?] are coming tomorrow. Describes the place; Moore 'played a lot and sang yesterday after tea', then they played cards and talked. Is reading James's "Daisy Miller", which is 'charming'. Discussion of the music box; has written to his mother to suggest having the partitions taken out; it is from both George and Charles. Expects it would be best to invite the consul [Henry Turing, at Rotterdam, to the wedding celebration]; he may not come. Did not mean that Sir Henry [Howard] would arrange all the legal marriage business, but he offered to arrange the ceremony and invitation of the consul; expects he could do this most easily but it would not matter if they or her uncle should arrange it. Will write to Sir Henry or Turing when he hears from her uncle, though is not sure what to say. Would prefer to invite Sir Henry to the wedding, especially as Bob's father and mother are coming, feels he should ask his parents what they think. Sir Henry is a relation, and has 'shown great good-will and readiness'.

Does not see why Bessie should cut herself off completely from her Dutch musical friends; she will 'often be in Holland', and will 'surely stay at Mein's [sic: Mien Rontgen's] in Amsterdam'; in England, she will of course have 'complete freedom to make her own friends' and must keep up and develop her own talents as much as she can; he will enjoy hearing her play, but also going to hear others and getting to know her friends, but that does not mean she should not have independence of interests and friendships. Thinks that women 'have not enough respect for their own intellectual lives' and give it up too easily on marriage, through their husband's fault or their own; she should 'quite seriously consider going to settle in Berlin for 5 or 6 months' for her music. Mrs [Helen] Fry's marriage has made her more of a painter. Her pleurisy is better now; thinks Bessie exaggerates the importance of her cigarette smoking, and that any ill effects it does have are balanced by the help it gives her to create art. Has never 'been in danger of being in love' with Helen Fry, but always found her 'more interesting and amusing than any woman [he] ever met... with a completely original personality', and would not think of criticising such a person's habits but would assume they are 'best suited to their temperament'; in the same way, Moore probably 'drinks more whisky than is good for his health, and smokes too much too', but he would not criticise him. Bessie is also 'an original person' with a 'personal genius of [her] own', but in addition he loves her; has never felt the same about any other woman.

Continues the letter next day. Has finished "Daisy Miller"; and is doing some German, getting on better than he thought he would. Part of the reason for saying he would 'never learn German' was an 'exaggerated idea of the difficulty', but more because he thought, and still thinks, it will be less of a 'literary education' than other languages; is chiefly learning it for Goethe, though being able to read German scholarship will be useful. Has read Coleridge's translation of "Wallenstein", which Schiller himself claimed was as good as the original; thinks English and [Ancient] Greek lyric poetry is better than the German he has read. Very sorry about Lula [Julius Röntgen]; asks if it [his illness] will do more than postpone him going to Berlin. Has heard from Daniel that Sanger is 'getting on quite well'; hopes he will return from Greece 'quite himself again'. Will be nice for Bessie to see the Joneses [Herbert and Alice] again; he has 'become a little parsonic perhaps' but very nice; has seen little of him for the last few years. Bessie should certainly get [Stevenson's] "Suicide Club" for Jan [Hubrecht]; will pay half towards it. Will certainly come before Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht] returns. Has grown 'such a beard, finer than Moore's and McCarthy's, though they have grown their's for weeks'. Describes their daily routine. Is encouraged that Moore likes several recent poems he himself was doubtful about; is copying out the play and will show him today or tomorrow. The Davieses are coming this afternoon. Signs off with a doggerel verse.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Is sure things will improve and she must not worry; as his mother says, 'it is really rather... a storm in a teacup'; it is nothing to compare to the happiness that will soon be theirs. Though he often fails 'through weakness and idleness', his life 'has been passionately devoted... to the best and most beautiful things which [his] imagination can attain to' and hers will be as well; lists all that will be good in their lives. Will write again to the consul [Henry Turing] if he does not hear from him today, since they need to know whether he can come on the 7th [June]; has also not heard from Sir Henry Howard, through whom he sent the letter; will send the second letter direct to Turing. There has been some delay at the lawyers about the settlements; has written to tell them to speed up. Bessie should tell him if he need do anything else regarding the marriage conditions her uncle sent. Thinks he may come over on 12 or 13 June. Meta Smith, his aunt Margaret's daughter, has sent a silver inkstand, and Mrs Holman Hunt a piece of Japanese silk. Had a good time at Cambridge: saw Mrs McTaggart, a 'nice quiet sort of person'; Tom Moore read his play and thinks it should come out well though he has pointed out 'some serious faults and suggested alterations'; Moore is going to give him a lot of his woodcuts, and has begun an Epithalamium for them, though since he has not got on with it says they should defer the wedding for a month. Asks what he should do about the Apostles' dinner; it will be 'quite exceptional this year', Harcourt is president and everyone will come; would very much like to go but will not break their honeymoon if she does not wish it. Very keen to go to the lakes eventually, but they could spend a few days before the dinner at Blackdown among his 'old haunts'; Mrs Enticknap's aunt lives in a farmhouse a mile from Roundhurst, which would be perfect. Hopes [Alice and Herbert] Jones' visit has been a success. [Desmond] MacCarthy is coming tomorrow for a few days and [Oswald?] Sickert on Sunday for the day. Will see [the Frys] this evening and discuss colours for the walls. Thinks [Charles] Sanger is very happy; is not entirely sure [about the marriage], since 'Dora has behaved so strangely', but everything seems to be coming right. Has ben reading Emerson on poetry and imagination and thinks it 'amazingly fine and right'. Most people think "Pères et enfants [Fathers and Sons]" is Turgenev's best book; he himself does not like the ending but finds the book charming; has heard the French translation, the only one he has read, is better than the German or English one - Sickert says so and he is half-German. Has ordered the trousers, and found the catalogue so will order the beds and so on next week. Glad Bessie got on with her socialist sister [Theodora]. has just had a note from Sir Henry Howard saying 7 June will suit Turing; she should let her uncle know. Does not think there will be further delay with the legal papers.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

8 Grosvenor Crescent, London S.W. - Has come to London to be nearer to Bessie in her 'difficulties'; his train was late so his parents were out when he arrived, but will talk to them later. Does not think they will yet have had a letter from her. 'Grieved' she reproaches herself for writing as she did [about her uncle's reaction to the idea of inviting Sir Henry Howard]; does not think he was wrong to tell his father but understands why she might think he was. As for his mother's letter, he understands why Bessie has appealed directly to his father. His father has sent him a copy and he thinks it may hold out 'a hope of his coming' to the wedding after all. Thinks the best solution is for the Howards to be invited and his father come; is now anxious about how her uncle will take his mother's letter, which is meant to be conciliatory; her uncle has no right to be angry with her. His father is not offended; even less so than when he first learnt of the Grandmonts' possible reaction to Sir Henry being invited. Further discussion of the situation. Will come over earlier if she wants him to, otherwise will cross next Monday and stay in the same hotel. If this matter is settled, may go to Roundhurst with the Frys on Friday, where he wants to take her before the [Apostles'] dinner. Is glad she does not mind him going; it is not in Cambridge but London, where they could perhaps stop the night at a hotel. Will bring over her underclothes and the spectacles. Is sorry Alice Jones minded so much about the civil marriage; 'Church people in England are often very difficult on such matters, but Alice is 'evidently very nice, and very fond' of Bessie. Tells Bessie to get Dutch books with their [Alice and Herbert Jones's] present; would not have her 'unDutched for the world'. Glad his last letter gave her 'so much joy and confidence'.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, Hague; addressed to Bob at Penmenner House, The Lizard, Cornwall. - Thinks Bob must not have got her letter of Tuesday [9/46]; hopes someone will send it on. Thanks him for writing his note before setting off and for the drawing of the eye. Hopes he does not mind that she is writing so frequently; asks him to say what he thinks of the music box, for which she has written to thank Mrs Price [Bob's aunt]. Alice Jones and her brother Herbert are coming to the Hague on the 26th, after a trip to Dresden; has not seen Alice since 1895, and Herbert since 1893 when he came home from the holidays and ate all her 'hopjes' [Dutch sweets] 'in one sitting' (he later sent her a box of Cambridge ginger sweets at school). Is going out for a slow walk with her aunt soon as the weather is 'heavenly'. Tomorrow is Jan [Hubrecht]'s birthday; she wants to order [Robert Louis] Stevenson's "Suicide Club" for him, and will tell him it is a present from them both. Will probably have another lesson with [Bram] Eldering next week, then may go to see an aunt at Hilversum and her [half] sister who is married to a doctor [Henriette]. Poor Lula [Julius] Röntgen has been very ill and cannot go yet to Berlin to start work. Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht] does not plan to return before 20 or 25 May as she wants to spend time at Florence on the way back; perhaps Bob could come over just before she arrives.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, Hague; addressed to Bob at 3 Hare Court, Inner Temple, London. - Returns the samples of cloth, with comments on which she prefers for Bob's travelling suit; for his [wedding] trousers thinks he should find a light blueish grey cloth and encloses a sample of the colour she recommends; tells him not to get the coat of his travelling suit made too short as her aunt thinks he looks as if he is growing out of his old one. Has looked up the address at the British consul at Rotterdam, Henry Thuring [sic: Turing]; her uncle remains of the opinion that Bob should write to the consul and she agrees this is much more courteous; suggests he send the letter to Sir Henry Howard with a note informing him of their plans. Her uncle has been reading the marriage contract to her; it goes now to the notary 'for a last polish' and will soon be sent to Bob for his approval. Asks him to tell her when he does the shopping in London for the beds; discusses the things which his mother is kindly going to send some things from Welcombe. Will write to Charles and George [Trevelyan] to thank them for the music box. Goes for a lesson in Amsterdam [with Eldering] on Friday, and will stay the night with 'cousin [Gredel] Guye'; then goes to stay with an aunt at Hilversum till Sunday; will spend Sunday with her [half] sister [Theodora] who 'lives in the farm with her husband the socialist', and return to Amsterdam to [her sister] Mien, who has invited her to stay for the evening entertainment after Joachim's concert to meet him. When Joachim plays at the Hague next Friday, she will go with Alice Jones, who is staying a little longer than [her brother] Herbert. Cannot fit in a visit to Almelo [to see her friend Jeanne Salomonson Asser] and her other sister [Henriette] before May. Asks Bob to bring 'the gold spectacles' with him when he comes over. Tuttie [Hubrecht] is coming on May 17 or 18; her own birthday is on 21 May, asks if Bob could come before that. Encloses a newspaper cutting with a poem by Vondel's contemporary Hooft, translated by

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

c/o Mrs Salomonson, 49 Wierdensche Straat, Almelo; addressed to Bob at the Mill House, Westcott, Dorking, Surrey. - Has been a week since Bob last wrote; hopes he is all right, and that he is in the country enjoying the sun. Went for a long drive yesterday to a place with an old castle and 'lovely wood' where they sat outside and had lunch; Jeanne [Salomonson Asser] seems well and happy and is very kind; gave Bessie a 'wonderful piece' of imitation Venice lace which she had worked herself, as well as an antique copper basket for flowers or fruit; Jeanne's husband went away yesterday, and Bessie is not sorry that she will see little of him again since she does not like him much, though he and Jeanne are happy and seem well suited. Jeanne has confided some little worries about her marriage which Bessie will tell Bob about later; does not think Jeanne ought to reproach herself as her husband does not seem to completely understand her. Received a telegram from Alice Jones this morning asking if she could come two weeks later; this will not be possible as they are repainting the rooms then and Bessie will be too busy; hopes Alice will still come. Writes later after receiving Bob's two letters. Discusses the material for Bob's wedding clothes again. Is glad he has written the letters to Sir Henry [Howard] and the consul [Henry Turing]. Would love to go to see Dan Leno with Bob some time. No reason why Bob should not go on sending letters to Irene Locco and writing letters to her, as long as Bessie and Bob love each other 'in the right way'. Tomorrow it is 'Venus day', as well as birthday and death day of Shakespeare. Is reading Turgenieff's "Väter und Söhne" [Fathers and Sons], which she thinks Bob has talked about, having read it in English translation as "Generations"; thinks it wonderful.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

The Hague. - Agrees with Bob that he should not come over till mid-May, and does not think her uncle seriously wishes him to come earlier; does not understand why he is having friends to stay and going visiting again if he wants to get some more work done, but is glad he is going to see them. Thinks there will be plenty of time for business or visiting; they might go to Utrecht, Amsterdam and Rotterdam, and would love to go with him to Heerde in Gelderland where her sister [Henriette] lives; will have to go there to see the children and her husband the doctor before she leaves, though her sister is probably coming to the wedding. Does not know where Bob left the bed catalogue; thinks she remembers seeing it last in Charles's room at Grosvenor Crescent; asks if they can order a softer mattress. Will measure her Dutch pillowcases tomorrow and send him the measurements; further discussion of fittings and furniture, and arrangements for packing and unpacking her things. Bob should ask his mother about what tie he should wear with his frock coat; Dutch husbands always wear white tie with their evening dress; thinks blue or green suit him if he is to choose a coloured tie. If the patent boots he wore to Roger [Fry]'s wedding are still good he can wear them again. Hopes he will soon hear from Mrs Pepper; 'what a name for a honeymoon lady!!'. Spent two nights at Almelo which were enjoyable but so hot she had difficulty sleeping; Jeanne [Salamonson Asser] very kindly tried to 'read her to sleep out of "Pilgrim's Progress"'. Then went to Amsterdam, where she helped Mien [Röntgen] arrange the flowers and table, before they went to the [Joachim] concert which was 'delightful beyond words'; they did a Haydn, Brahms and a Beethoven quartet. Then they returned for the supper party, at which '[Bob's] friend young Harold Joachim, the Oxford fellow' was present; he sat next to her at supper and seems a 'very nice fellow'; they had met once before at St Andrews when she thought him 'a strange odd person & was in great awe of him'. Thinks Harold wants her and Bob to come and see them at Haslemere when 'Uncle Jo' is staying with them; Bessie was at school with his sister. Tomorrow the quartet are in the Hague, and Harold is crossing by night so she has invited him to lunch. When healths were being drunk at the end of the meal and she went up to Joachim to touch glasses, he at once proposed 'Ihr Bräutigam' ['Your bridegroom']; he remembered that Bob's father had once taken him home in his carriage. On Tuesday she went to see her 'socialist sister [Theodora] and her husband [Herman Heijenbrock]' on their farm and enjoyed her day with them more than she had expected to; they are very happy together and she admires their convictions though they do not convince her.

Returns to the letter next day, before going to meet [Alice and Herbert] Jones. Is sure Bob would be 'amused' to meet the socialist couple, but he [Heijenbrock] does not know English so it would be no good. Then went to stay with the aunt who lives nearby; she is not a 'favourite' in their house and they do not see her often, but several of her sisters see her often; the aunt was very friendly but it is never pleasant to be there. Fortunately her daughter, Bessie's cousin, was also there. Found her uncle and aunt fairly well when she returned, but the house is in 'a horrible state' due to the repainting, and they both have a slight cold. Went to the station to meet the Jones and they did not appear; English visitors 'always change their plans at the last minute or miss trains... or don't wire in time' as is the case for the Joneses, who are now coming tomorrow. [Harold] Joachim also cannot come to lunch and is calling in the afternoon. [Joseph] Joachim is staying tonight with Mr [Nicolaas] Pierson, the Finance Minister, and his wife, who has invited Bessie to a select party this evening. Is going to the concert tomorrow night with Alice Jones; the Röntgens may also come. The cellist [Robert] Hausmann is 'a charming person, so refined and artistic'; talked to him the other night and he admired Bob's ring. Bob will get this letter when he comes up to London to see his father. She thinks he should bring any work she has not seen on their honeymoon, as they might not have much quiet time before the wedding. Understands that his 'literary ambition is not connected with [his] love' and thinks this is right. Last half page with pillowcase measurements.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht. - Originally enclosing a new photograph of herself, wearing a green dress and Bob's 'favourite hat'. Had an excellent evening at the Piersons' last night; [the Joachim Quartet] played a late Beethoven quartet she had never heard before, which made her 'nearly jump into the sky', and then a Schumann one. Talked to [Joseph] Joachim; hopes they will meet him again, perhaps at Harold Joachim's family's house at Haslemere. Alice and Herbert Jones arrived this morning; since Herbert is returning home tonight he has done lots of sightseeing with her uncle, then Bessie took him to the Mauritshuis picture galley. She and Alice are going to the Joachim concert tonight. Felt 'quite schooly again' seeing them; they talked lots about Bob. The Joneses were staying in the same pension at Dresden as Lily Hodgkin and 'her brother (the Oxford one); the brother is studying German and Lily music; Lily wanted Alice to send her Bob's address so that she could send a wedding present. Herbert 'seemed rather astonished if not shocked' that the wedding was not to be in a church; supposes the idea is rather 'awful' for an English clergyman. He is 'very bright & cheerful... & humorous as ever', though she does not think he is 'ein feinfühlender Mensch [sensitive man]'.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, the Hague. - Has just received Bob's letter with the long explanation about his father's request; she understands, and had already said she would withdraw any objection [to inviting Sir Henry Howard to the wedding] if his parents wished it. She had made an objection 'long before the Grandmonts thought of it', but did not realize the Howards were 'so much & friendly related' to Bob's father. Has resolved not to be as worried about these things; it is not possible to insist on 'an ideal day'. Will talk to her uncle and ask him to send the invitation; hopes the Grandmonts will not decide to stay away, and agrees they should be told at once; Bramine knows how much it would hurt her if they did not come. Hopes they have forwarded the letter with her photograph to him. Originally enclosing the pattern she prefers for Bob's trousers. Tomorrow, she and Alice [Jones] are going sight-seeing in Amsterdam; they have talked a great deal about their school days; went to the English church with her this morning and did not enjoy yourself. Would be nice if Bob wrote a letter to thank the servants; thinks it would be best to send it to Booa [Mary Prestwich], but he should ask his mother who 'knows her people better'.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

Hague. - Talked to her uncle this evening, but he did not respond as well as she thought he would to the suggestion that [Sir Henry] Howard and his wife should be invited to the wedding; these days he cannot grasp a new idea 'without making a difficulty, an obstacle out of it'; this time he said the character of the occasion would be changed and it would become a 'state party', and she assured him she did not mind. Since he has never met the Howards he felt he could not invite them; she told him to think about the idea until Bob came over, when he may get to know them and ask them. Thinks it will all come right; his habit of making difficulties is 'infectious' and she asks Bob to help her resist this tendency in herself.

Returns to the letter on Tuesday morning [1 May]: wishes Bob were there to ''help & comfort her' since her uncle has been 'raging' at her for suggesting writing to the Grandmonts to tell them about perhaps inviting Sir Henry. Her aunt has just talked to her about it: they are 'very much against ' being obliged to ask someone they do not know and do not really care to ask; tells Bob this privately and thinks it best to wait now until he comes over and can talk to her uncle himself. It might be even better, if Bob's father strongly wishes the Howards to be invited, that he write and say so himself to her uncle, and give him an introduction to them. She only wanted to be totally frank, and thought telling her uncle how strongly Bob's father felt would persuade him; instead she has made him 'feel offended' at the idea of Bob's father 'wishing to govern' his invitations and 'threatening' that he would not come over if the Howards were not invited. Feels very helpless; hates to 'make a "stand" against people'; her uncle is very hard to deal with and her aunt just supports him. Poor Alice Jones must know something is going on, but she cannot discuss this with her.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, the Hague. - Is writing early in the morning because of Alice Jones's early departure; her uncle is taking Alice as far as Gouda to help her into the carriage to Flushing [Vlissingen]. Has generally much enjoyed her visit and talking over old school days; Alice is the only one of her old friends who knows something of Bob through her brother [Herbert] and the Hodgkins. She is 'very sensible about the [Second Boer] war'; though since she is 'very penetrated with English Church Christianity', is much pained by the thought that Bessie and Bob are not to have a church wedding; Bessie has tried to explain that it is 'a matter of custom & individual opinion', Alice tried to find out everything Bob thought and believed, but Bessie did not reveal anything. May have written too strongly in her last letter [about whether Sir Henry Howard and his wife should be invited to the wedding]; Ambro [Hubrecht] was here on Wednesday and her uncle and aunt talked it over when she was out of the room; thinks he may have influenced them in the right way but does not know as her aunt would not discuss it until her uncle was there; they may discuss it when she returns from Amsterdam tonight. If her uncle's view is still not 'satisfactory', they had better wait until Bob comes over. Her last letter was 'very unkind & ungentle'; she remembers saying it was private and hopes he has not acted on it. Discussion of his crossing, which is now very soon; will come to meet him at the station. Asks him to ask Booa [Mary Prestwich] to give him a parcel of clothing she is keeping for Bessie, and to unpack it and put the contents amongst his things to escape notice at customs; he must also bring the gold spectacles for Ambro. Asks if they could deposit some of their belongings somewhere in London instead of taking them all on their honeymoon. Tuttie [Hubrecht] is coming between 20 and 25 of May. The Hodgkins [Lily and Robert] are crossing today, with Alice; is sorry she could not persuade them to come to the Hague as she would have liked very much to see them. Alice has given her a pound to buy some books as a wedding present; asks if Bob has any suggestions, or whether she should get some Dutch books. Asks if he has ordered his trousers. Asks whether [Desmond] McCarthy and [Oswald?] Sickert are staying with Bob, and whether he is enjoying his 'bachelor party & manners for the last time'. Starting for Amsterdam, and her last but one lesson [with Bram Eldering]; will read Goethe's "Faust".

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, the Hague. - Things are looking 'a little brighter': if Bob is at Grosvenor Crescent he will have heard from his father about her letter to him and his response; asks whether his father or he thinks it was wrong of her to write. Sir George said she ought to tell her uncle at once about his wife's letter; was glad he seemed not to have entirely made up his mind not to come. Has had a long talk with her uncle, which resulted in him writing a draft letter to Bob's father that she thinks 'will entirely clear up the matter'; he was 'very distressed' when he realised the possible consequences. Her uncle writes that if Bob's father writes a few lines saying he would like to see [Sir Henry] Howard and his wife at the wedding, this will serve as an introduction and he will go and call on them; he also writes that in his son Ambro's view, the presence of the Howards means that the wedding should be celebrated in the English church, and Bessie was 'so astounded' she forgot to tell him the Howards are Roman Catholic so she does not think they 'care a hang'; she told him this morning. Her uncle has sent Ambro the draft letter to see what he thinks. She has felt very lonely and distressed, but now everything is all right and she is looking forward very much to Bob's arrival; feels 'incompleteness' without him, as if her '"moitié", as Grandmont always says' had been taken away. Hopes he has had a good time with [Desmond] MacCarthy and [Oswald] Sickert. Thinks the idea of going to stay near Roundhurst for a few days at the beginning of the honeymoon is 'delightful'. He seems to have had nice [wedding] presents; she is keeping a list of them. Mentions again that Alice Jones wanted to give her a book; her aunt at Hilversum has sent an antique silver clothes-brush. Tried on her wedding-dress the other day and felt 'enormously grand with a train'. Is doing her accounts for the year.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, the Hague. - Her uncle received Bob's letter with 'all the legal papers, settlement etc.' last night. Asks if Bob read through the settlement; she tried to last night but did not understand everything, nor did her uncle, so he has sent it to his lawyer to have it explained and they will return it as soon as possible. Her uncle was surprised not to find the marriage contract enclosed; thinks he expects Bob to write saying he approves and sending the contract back. Does not now feel 'bitter' about the earlier tensions as she loves and understands her uncle too much. [Sir Henry] Howard and his wife called yesterday and left cards, so the 'bridge' is formed. Is busy with packing and clearing; tonight she will look through an interesting old collection of papers relating to her mother's life and marriage with her uncle; she will certainly want to keep her mother's own letters. Tomorrow she is lunching with her 'only Dutch co-senior of St. Andrews, a girl from Rotterdam whose mother was an old friend of Bramine [Hubrecht]'s. Likes the clavichord present all the more as she thinks of it; thinks it very nice of Bob's friends; asks if Mrs [Helen] Fry [who decorated it] is pleased, and what 'poor Dolmetsch' will do without it. Teases Bob for having 'wedding presents from nice young lady friends [Lily Hodgkin] sent over from Dresden' and keeping it secret from her; she found out from Alice Jones. Tells him not to forget the parcel Booa will give him, nor the gold spectacles; he should also bring his play and any other poems he likes.

Letter from Edith Cropper to Caroline Trevelyan

Tolson Hall, Kendal; dated 'Tuesday'. - Carrie has reached the time she herself dreads: a son's engagement. Curious that Elizabeth should have stayed in this parish with their cousins: she and Alice Jones were at St. Andrews together. Remembers her as a 'girl with a sweet dignified manner - tall & not apparently foreign' and as a 'charming violin player'. Sends Robert good wishes.

Letter from Mary Wakefield Cropper to Caroline Trevelyan

Ellergreen, Kendal. - Congratulates Caroline on Robert's engagement to Elizabeth van der Hoeven, whom she remembers as a 'most attractive & rather impressive girl of 19' who played the violin 'delightfully' and whom they all admired greatly; she knew one of Mary's 'young cousins' [Alice Jones] from school at St Andrews. Very glad to think Caroline will have 'a daughter so loveable and interesting and accomplished'; also good to have 'a link of peace with Holland just now' [at the time of the Second Boer War]. She and her father much enjoyed their Sunday with Caroline; he is ill with a fever at the moment, though she does not think seriously.