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Welby, Reginald Earle (1832-1915) 1st Baron Welby
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Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford upon Avon. - Amused by Elizabeth's letter, and glad Robert is returning so soon. Both Lord Welby and Lord Davey are 'very good talkers', and Lady Davey is 'charming' so their visit has been very pleasant; she tells Caroline that there is a house to be let at Fernhurst called "Ropes"; just built, by a Miss Coats, who now thinks there is 'not enough view & is going to build another'. Lady Davey also says that Blackdown Cottage is very damp and has no foundations; Mrs Frederic Harrison [Ethel Harrison] was 'very ill there with Rheumatic gout' and two people died in the house while they lived there. Likes to think of Elizabeth and Robert both at home again, 'with the good Enticknaps'. S[idney?] Colvin is not coming; she is glad as the 'row in Stratford seems to be growing, & he is in it' while they wish to keep out of it. Was very good to have Elizabeth to visit them; Sir George sends his love, and 'much appreciated' the letter from Robert.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - The Leith Hill hotel is a 'very ideal caravansary' and must bring Robert and Elizabeth good company; glad Sidney Colvin admired Paul; is very keen to see him again. Met Jan [Hubrecht] in the street in London and 'mistook him for Hilton Young... no ill compliment'. Jan said it happened to him 'constantly' at Cambridge. Is halfway through his proofs [of the last volume of "The American Revolution"]; glad they will be alone until it is finished. Staying with them have been: Welby; Tom Brassey and his wife; 'the beautiful Lady Carew'; Lady Reay; Bernard and Mrs Mallet; Alfred Lyall. Is halfway through "Dombey" [Charles Dickens's "Dombey and Son"] and is reading other things such as Beugnot's "Memoirs", placed first in interest by Ferdinand de Rothschild 'the great authority on French memoirs'; Beugnot knew '"at home" the Diamond Necklace gang'.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S. W. - Saw [Edward] Chandos Leigh recently, 'a sad wreck after some terrible medical experiences'; he is old enough 'to have played against Winchester at Lords, when the Winchester eleven wore tall white beaver hats!', and spoke in a most friendly way about Robert. The "Manchester Guardian" praises "Winter", by C[harles] Shannon, at the Academy; does not know whether it is he who is Robert's 'principal friend' or J. J. Shannon. Had a 'famous' lunch at the Courtneys' on Saturday: Lord Courtney, Henry James, Lord Welby and himself, as well as 'the grand figure of old Lady Airlie'. Caroline looked 'quite juvenile', as she always does to him. The Sargent portrait of Henry James is 'very fine indeed'. They look forward to seeing Elizabeth.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Interested to hear about the Hunt; read something in a London newspaper about a hunt at Wastwater, but it mentioned undergraduates and may have been an 'imitation party'. Amused to hear about Phil [Morgan Philips Price], who is a 'Trojan'. Very pleasant about the [Lascelles] Abercrombies whom Bessy has written more about. Has enjoyed a three night visit from [Lord] Welby and Courtenay Ilbert. Ilbert is 'wonderful company', having the 'vigour and vitality' of his 'Alpine comrade' [James] Bryce, but also 'something more ideal about him'. Both good and bad for 'a very able man to be under authority to the last'.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - They 'rejoice with' Robert at Roger Fry's success [his appointment as Curator of Paintings at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York]; glad that Robert will not lose his friend but see so much of him when he comes to England. Thinks Fry's father [Sir Edward] did a 'very fine thing' in returning money [part of his remuneration, to the Metropolitan Water Board] the other day; the 'disinterestedness' it demonstrated has much declined recently. Glad that Campbell-Bannerman's government has taken the step of 'revindicating honesty and public spirit'; was 'disgraceful' of Balfour to reverse the last Liberal government's veto on [ministers] keeping directorships. Agrees with Robert in looking forward to the parliamentary session, especially to the Budget. Sir George and Caroline want to give Robert and Elizabeth a 'minute interest in the Budget' by paying them fifty pounds twice a year instead of making good the income tax on their allowance. Went to the British Museum on Saturday and found a 'Liberal atmosphere' everywhere in London; Welby and Sir Courtenay Ilbert 'seemed to breathe very freely in it'. Has finished Catullus and will read the "[Appendix] Virgiliana" today.