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Adams, Charles Francis (1835-1915) soldier, businessman, civic leader, and historian
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Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Has looked through three volumes of the "Yellow Book" and agrees with Robert that there is 'a certain collective energy and enthusiasm' which makes all the contributors 'do more vigourously [sic], or at any rate more oddly, what they regard as their ideal'; [Henry] James's two stories are very strong; [Walter] Sickert's illustrations 'most curious - in a way better than Beardsley's. The Charles Adamses, 'a pleasant couple', are staying; he is enthusiastic about going on to Flodden; he is seventy one, and his great grandfather [John Adams] was 'deeply interested in the world' up till the age of ninety. Charles Adams has seen bigger battles than Flodden, and was 'asleep in his saddle during Pickins's [sic: Pickett's Charge] at Gettysburg'. The 'Cambo folk' [Charles and Mary] are coming for lunch, with the [Malcolm?] Macnaghtens and 'all the babies'. In a postscript, notes that he has had another letter from [Theodore] Roosevelt, with 'three new spellings'.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent. - Glad Robert is having a 'satisfactory' time; they are enjoying occasional meetings with Bessy. Is going by car to Harrow for an outing, and will try to get acquainted with the Headmaster [Lionel Ford]. Thinks Robert's ["Bride of] Dionysus" 'stately and dignified', appreciating 'the conditions under which it is written [as a libretto for Donald Tovey's opera]. Has had a long letter from Charles Adams; it is 'sad about Henry [Charles Adams's brother, who had suffered a stroke] but not intensely. Roosevelt has written a 'delightful little prefatory notice' for [George Cabot] Lodge's two volumes of poetry, which Senator [Henry Cabot] Lodge has sent him; praises [Henry] Adams's biography [of George Cabot Lodge].

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Sir George Trevelyan

The Park, Prestwich, Manchester. - Is staying here for a weekend on his way home; Aunt Annie has a 'bad cold' and does not well, but he thinks the cold is getting better and she will 'have a quieter time now than she has had for the last few weeks'. They have had a 'very successful Hunt', with fine weather most of the time, and 'some good runs each day'. Charles seemed very well, though 'was careful about going down hill too fast'; he and George seemed very cheerful, and 'Molly kept us all very lively in the evening'. Robert 'was hare twice, and was caught twice each day', though he 'gave them two very good runs'. A 'young Cadbury, fresh from Cambridge [Laurence John Cadbury?]' came for the first time and 'is quite an acquisition, as he is a great runner, and also a thoughtful and interesting young man'.

Thanks his father for sending Charles Adams' letter [originally sent with 12/194]; his brother [Henry]'s illness is 'very unfortunate', but it looks as if he will fully recover; 'had no idea' that Adams was so old. Is just going out to call on 'old Mr [Edward?] Broadfield, whom Aunt Annie tells me I shall probably find in bed' though happy to talk; will go to London tomorrow, and home on Tuesday, since Bessie does not want him back till then as their 'domestic changes [the replacement of the Enticknaps, cook/housekeeper and gardener at the Shiffolds, with the Elmses] will not be completed until then'. She and Julian seem to be very well. Aunt Annie joins with him in sending love to his parents.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

The Shiffolds. - Forgot to return the enclosed [a letter from Charles Adams, see 12/194] to his father in his last letter; hopes Mr [Henry] Adams is now recovering. Returned home on Tuesday, and 'found Bessie and Julian very well'; Bessie was 'a little tired by the moving [the replacement of the Enticknaps as cook/ housekeeper and gardener by Elms', but now seems all right. All seems to have gone smoothly, and so far Elms has been 'satisfactory'. Mrs Enticknap was 'not in the right frame of mind evidently, but Enticknap all along has been very nice, and has made things easier'. It is 'really a relief to have got rid of Mrs E[nticknap]'.

Spent a weekend with Aunt Annie; she did not look well, but seems to be recovering from her cold, and will have an 'easier time'. Thanks his mother for her present of the teak seat, which is now on the lawn, it 'looks splendid, and will be a great thing to have in the garden in the warm weather'. Is 'very sorry to hear that Booa [Mary Prestwich] is ill', and hopes to hear good news about her soon.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Thanks Elizabeth for her letter and J[ulian]'s; he seems to have a great deal of imagination, 'sometimes about "Jesus" sometimes about the sea'. Glad Elizabeth changed the book; it was the only one she had as her stock of presents is very low. Lucky that there were no complications in Julian's illness; expects they are not in quarantine. Good that C[harles] and M[ary] so like having the twins [Hugh and Florence]; hopes the boy develops well as he 'must be very small'. Still recovering slowly [from shingles]. The oldest and biggest poplar tree 'snapped in the middle' last week, and is being cut up to carry away. Thanks Elizabeth for the paper about the peace conference in Holland; fears the war 'will go on for a very long time' and is very anxious: 'the next few months will be terrible'. Does not think she knows Mr [Harry?] Norton. Sir George has just heard that Charles F. Adams has died; he had not heard from him for a while; the older brother [Henry Brooks Adams, in fact a younger brother?] is still alive; he was here two years ago. Has had news of a great snow storm at Cambo last week, causing trains to stop and many other difficulties.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Glad Robert is reading his book [the last volume of "The American Revolution] 'at the pace a true author wishes to be read'; discusses printing errors. A thousand copies were sold in the first nine days, excellent 'under the circumstances'; no reviewers now question his presentation of the war and [Lord] North's government.. Sends a letter from Dolly Thompson, and a belated one from Charles Adams, which went by mistake to Wellington in New Zealand.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Sometimes thinks Robert had 'almost a strong a feeling' as his own for Charles Francis Adams [who has just died]. Sends an interesting letter from the Hon George Duncan, Caroline's relative, who married a 'very nice woman, now dead' [Laura Dove Blanchard], a relative of the Adamses; the letter gives a 'very pleasing impression of Duncan himself'. George sailed [back to his Red Cross unit?] in an American liner. Thoughts on the best way to keep the mind 'tolerably tranquil in thes world-pervading times'. Thoughts on what the sinking of the Falaba, and the death of 'one obscure American citizen' [Leon Chester Thrasher] may lead to; hopes the practice of blowing up non-combatant ships will not be a 'precedent accepted and established'. Has been thinking a great deal about Lord Nelson recently [due to an injury to his hand], 'especially at breakfast time'; has little sympathy with his 'personal history', but wonders 'how he managed to eat a boiled egg. Perhaps Lady Hamilton helped him'. Knows there are people worse off, who do not grumble.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad that Elizabeth enjoyed the visit of her friend [Miss de Natrys]. Sorry to hear she has nettle rash, which is a 'horrid thing'; she herself had it for several weeks on her return from therr travels this year. Glad Robert is better and hopes he will soon make progress; asks if he is working on the novel. Asks if [Roger Fry's] illustrations [for Robert's "Polyphemus and Other Poems"] are finished, and if the arrangement has been made with the publisher [Johnson]. Theo [Llewelyn] Davies is here today, as are Mr [Charles Francis, Jr] and Mrs Adams; the Adamses are American, and he has corresponded with Sir George for a long time so they are keen to meet each other. Tomorrow they are expecting the G [?] Buxtons and two daughters. Asks Elizabeth to write from Pinewood to say how Aunt Margaret [Holland] is. Hopes Robert and Elizabeth will be able to make their landlord do the repairs.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Glad to hear good news of Elizabeth, and that she got all her shopping now; if the 'elderly nurse seems suitable' when they meet, she will feel settled and ready for 'the event' [giving birth]. Helen Verrall is here; Mr Hunsfield [?] and his son are arriving today, then Sir George's American friend C[harles] F[rancis] Adams and his wife come on Saturday. Mary and Pauline return tomorrow; hopes the troubles [local illness?] are over. George arrived 'over-worked & looking ill'; is taking a real holiday and seems to be getting better. Sir George is well, and much enjoyed his days shooting yesterday at Catcherside. Sends love to Bob; was 'flattered' at him liking her article. Sure Elizabeth is enjoying Mr [Donald] Tovey's playing. Pantlin is finishing the flannels, which will be sent soon. Hopes the lane [at the new house] will soon be 'all it should be'.