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Trevelyan, Hugh Patrick (1915-1916) son of Sir Charles Philips Trevelyan and Mary Trevelyan
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Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Hopes that Julian is well again. They were 'taken aback by the arrival of the Twins [Hugh and Florence], but C[harles] and M[ary] seem very pleased; if Elizabeth visits, asks her to report on how strong she thinks the babies are: the boy seems small. Nurse Robinson is good and experienced. Offered to have the older children at once, but have not had a reply. Asks if Elizabeth would like to visit at the end of April or beginning of May, when it is very pretty here with the blossoms. Still recovering slowly [from shingles], with much pain and irritation; it is dull for Sir George, but they are better quiet; the 'daily anxiety [about the war] is very wearing'. Hopes Elizabeth will have her music competition; asks if she has been playing much.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Thanks Elizabeth for her letter and J[ulian]'s; he seems to have a great deal of imagination, 'sometimes about "Jesus" sometimes about the sea'. Glad Elizabeth changed the book; it was the only one she had as her stock of presents is very low. Lucky that there were no complications in Julian's illness; expects they are not in quarantine. Good that C[harles] and M[ary] so like having the twins [Hugh and Florence]; hopes the boy develops well as he 'must be very small'. Still recovering slowly [from shingles]. The oldest and biggest poplar tree 'snapped in the middle' last week, and is being cut up to carry away. Thanks Elizabeth for the paper about the peace conference in Holland; fears the war 'will go on for a very long time' and is very anxious: 'the next few months will be terrible'. Does not think she knows Mr [Harry?] Norton. Sir George has just heard that Charles F. Adams has died; he had not heard from him for a while; the older brother [Henry Brooks Adams, in fact a younger brother?] is still alive; he was here two years ago. Has had news of a great snow storm at Cambo last week, causing trains to stop and many other difficulties.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

The Shiffolds, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking. - Thanks his mother for her letters; is glad to hear that his father's hand is 'getting better without too much trouble', and that she herself is better [after shingles]. Hopes to visit before long, but his and Bessie's plans are 'not quite settled yet'. Went to London yesterday and saw 'Mr [Stanley] Unwin of Allen & Unwin', who is going to publish two of Robert's books. Robert will bear part of the costs, but Unwin is 'much more likely to push them and make them successful than Longmans, as he takes part of the risk himself, and is generally enterprising'. The first [The Foolishness of Solomon] will probably be published early in June.

Bessie and Julian are well. Robert 'lunched with Charles, and saw Molly and the twins'. All seemed 'quite well and cheerful'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Thanks Elizabeth for her letter, which tells her much more about the babies [Hugh and Florence] than she has yet heard; they will be 'an anxiety' for a few months and she hopes the nurse understands how to feed them, since she does not think Mary can usually nurse for long. Sir George has done 'wonderfully' so far, recovering well from the chloroform, with not much pain in the wound. The Birmingham doctor, Douglas Heath was 'a very clever energetic man'. Looks forward to seeing them all; hopes Robert will come for a visit and leave Elizabeth and Julian there as long as he can. Janet may come on 2 May to take M[ary] and H[umphry] away; no-one else is coming. Glad Elizabeth is not going to Holland, which would be very interesting but 'too dangerous'. Janet saw George off yesterday; will be a very interesting visit to America if he gets there safely. Returns to the letter to say that the doctor has been and is happy for Sir George to get about, as long as he keeps his hand still. Is glad Nannie [Evans] is well.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Has just heard by telephone about Mary [the birth of her and Charles's twins]; thinks that Miss Clarke [the governess] will bring the older children here in a few days. Booa [Mary Prestwich] is a little better and will be able to 'superintend' them, and he thinks Caroline will be happier to have them; she is still very weak after her illness, which she has not yet got rid of. A good article in the "Nation" last week on "The Bible and popular language and tradition" made him think of 'Julian and his Bible studies'. The 'Irish pieces' by Miss [Maria] Edgeworth are 'excellent'; reminds Rob of the pleasure she felt when Uncle Tom [Macaulay] complimented her in a footnote to the 6th chapter of his "History"; Macaulay used to say that the 'revelation of Lord Calambre' [in Edgeworth's "The Absentee"], like the return of Sir Thomas from Antigua in [Austen's] "Mansfield Park" were the true parallels to 'the discovery of Ulyssess to the suitors'; he also said the discovery of Tom Jones's parentage [in Fielding's novel] was the 'real parallel to the revelations in "Oedipus Tyrannus". Used to read Edgeworth's novels with 'great delight' when young, but cannot now; she wrote in 'more simple and elementary days'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Sir George's hand is much better; he can use it at meals now. Aunt Annie [Philips] is coming on Saturday; thinks this will do them both good; they have been very sad not to see the children. They are busy, but it is still good to see someone occasionally; she has people to tea sometimes though Sir George does not like afternoon callers. Hopes Elizabeth enjoyed the meetings; Mary would be disappointed 'not to take part & hear C[harles] speak, but 'twins are a great tie'; asks if she thinks Mary will be able to go on nursing them. Pleased to hear good news of Julian; wishes there were nearby children who could join in a class with him, but 'perhaps play is as good'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Hopes Elizabeth is 'getting on with the Quest' [for a new governess]; wonders whether the two candidates Annie says she has suggested will be suitable. Hughie has been 'very ill'; Lady Bell is also ill with shingles, so they are 'a sick household'; does not know whether the elder children have gone to Cambo this week as planned. The lambs here are 'charming' and Julian would love them. Sir George is well, though '"up & down"', probably due to 'anxiety & excitement' [over the war]. Have just had an interesting letter from Lord Reay, who is good at keeping up correspondence with his friends here and in America. Is reading a 'long but interesting' life of Wordworth by [George Maclean] Harper; asks if Bob has seen it.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Very sorry to tell Elizabeth that 'the poor little twin [Hugh] cannot live'; his illness is meningitis; Dr Still [?] came from London but could do nothing. The one comfort is that he 'sleeps & has no pain'. Mary has little time to write; she and Charles will be deeply grieved as 'they are so wrapped up in the children'. Glad Julian is well; sure he will be 'more free & active' [after his operation] which will 'keep his liver in order; nice that he gardens. Hopes the 'Scotch governess' is suitable; thinks they are 'generally more ready for country life'. She and Sir George are both very busy; Dr [Cyril?] Burt has called on Sir George and thinks him 'wonderfully strong'. The 'Hawtry's' [sic: Ralph Hawtrey and his wife?] must be 'an amusing pair'; glad they are happy. Janet and the children are visiting next week; does not know if she has let her house.