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Wixenford School
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Letter from E. P. Arnold to Caroline Trevelyan

Wixenford, Eversley. - Not worth while sending the 'usual formal Report of Bobbie's work', but thinks his mother will be glad to hear about his health and progress; the school will break up on 1 August. Bobbie now 'looks in perfect health', as Mr Sellar [Alexander Craig Sellar, father of Bobbie's schoolfellow Gerard?] will testify. He did two hours a day less work than usual when he first returned, is now only missing one hour, and Arnold hopes that by next week he will be doing the same as the other boys. Cannot yet give a 'decided opinion' on Bobbie's work: he is obviously 'a remarkably sensible boy' and will be 'easy to interest in anything worth learning'; he seemed 'slow and unmethodical' at first but has been much quicker in the last couple of days and when 'completely settled' should do even better. Seems to have covered 'a good deal of ground superficially' rather than having 'accurate knowledge' of any of his work, but 'one is liable to forget the fewness of his years in contemplating the multitude of his inches' so Arnold does not yet think he has fathomed his 'mental powers yet'. He is currently behind the third class, and in Latin will have to work temporarily in the one below; will bear in mind Mr Trevelyan's wish and not keep him back 'a day longer than necessary'. He is 'remarkably docile', 'cheerful and bright' over both work and play. Discusses his work and class placement in History, Geography and Arithmetic. He enjoys cricket and 'plays heartily', but seems particularly keen on his butterflies; thinks he is happy and will soon have many friends at school.

Heard from Mr Sellar that Mr Trevelyan was looking 'tired'; sends sympathy for his 'gigantic task' [as Secretary of State for Ireland]. Notes in a postscript that Bobbie does French with him; as with other subjects, he thinks he will soon do well, but currently has 'very little accurate knowledge'. Bobbie got his letters from his parents today and sends 'special thanks' to his father for writing'.

Letter from E. P. Arnold to George Otto Trevelyan

Wixenford, Eversley. - Will follow Mr Trevelyan's suggestions: the only time Bobbie would out of sight of a master would be while butterflying, for which boys are allowed to 'roam about at will', though only inside the grounds. Will make sure, 'without exciting any notice if possible' that Bobbie is never 'without someone strong enough to protect him'. Had had the same thoughts himself [that Bobbie may need to protection due to his father being Secretary of State for Ireland], since 'no scheme of wickedness seems too far-fetched or diabolical for these men'. Bobbie seems well, and is getting on in his work; hopes he will soon be 'altogether fit for the upper division'. Sorry to hear that Mrs Trevelyan was worried about not hearing from Bobbie as usual; has told him that his mother was disappointed and does not think he will forget again.

Letter from E. P. Arnold to Caroline Trevelyan

Wixenford, Eversley. - Asked Mrs Arnold to write yesterday with details of Bobbie's train home, as he was too busy to do so properly. Thinks they should be pleased with Bobbie's progress considering the 'long interruption to his work at the beginning of term'. Since his parents like him to do some work in the holiday, give some suggestions. Has done better in several examinations than in his class work, showing that he had 'understood and remembered the work better than anyone'; he tends to lose marks in class due to 'his slow manner and mumbling though not unintelligent way of reading'; gives an example of him understanding a grammar exercise better than older boys.

Letter from E. P. Arnold to Caroline Trevelyan

Wixenford, Eversley. - Has just returned from abroad; thanks Mrs Trevelyan for her recent letter and that of 6 August saying that Mr Trevelyan had paid a cheque into Arnold's account. Glad to hear how Bobbie has got on; will 'thankfully receive suggestions' if Mr Trevelyan finds time to test Bobbie, and expects that if his term is not interrupted by illness he will make 'marked progress'. Did not expect Bobbie to complete all the work he suggested for him over the holiday. Will expect him on 20 September, and let Mrs Trevelyan know if she hears of anyone else coming from London that day. Hopes that her summer has been 'comparatively free from anxiety'; saw notices about the 'tour in Ireland' in the newspapers, and hopes she enjoyed this; she must be glad to see 'difficulties gradually disappearing' there and the results of her husband's work [as Secretary of State]. He and Mrs Arnold send their regards.

Letter from E. P. Arnold to George Otto Trevelyan

Wixenford, Eversley. - Glad that Bobby's report [originally enclosed] is again 'a satisfactory one': he has done 'well all round' and would have done very well with a 'little more briskness'. Feels his 'continued rapid growth' may be slowing progress, so has suggested to the Matron [Elizabeth Bartlett?] she should ask Mrs Trevelyan if he can take the tonic he took last year for a few weeks. His conduct has been excellent, and 'with the approval of all the masters' he has been given the senior boys' 'little privileges of walking alone etc'; thinks he has 'just the kind of character that grows with increasing responsibilities'. Thinks Bobbie intends to work hard and be higher in class by the end of term; he 'did decidedly best' in the Greek exercises they are just beginning.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

[On headed notepaper for 8 Grosvenor Crescent, S.W.]:- Is 'so very sorry to hear about Grandpapa Trevelyan [his illness or death?], it is very sad indeed'. Thanks his mother for the hamper, which he and Blackwood greatly enjoyed. Thinks he and Charlie are getting on very well; they both went to tea with Mr [J. W.?] Cunningham, who Robert thinks has the house G. O. Trevelyan stayed in when he first went to Harrow. Mr Cunningham is old and 'very pleasant'.

Thinks there will be a rehearsal of the speech day tomorrow. It is 'very cold', and if the weather continues he thinks he will 'not go to ducker [the outdoor swimming pool]'. Has received a letter from Mr Arnold, who says they [Wixenford School] have won a match against Mortimer: the school seems to be 'getting better at games'. Hopes Georgie is well.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Chief Secretary's Lodge, Phoenix Park, Dublin. - Thanks Bob for his 'very nice letter'. Glad that he likes Alexander, and has scored some goals; his father is pleased that Bob is working so well and hopes he make much progress this term. Last night was very windy, and there has been a snowstorm today; it is very cold. Some of the photographs that have arrived, and are very good; will send Bob one. Has not yet been able to get Bob a hymn book, but will send one before next Sunday. Asks how many boys there are this term.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Chief Secretary's Lodge, Phoenix Park, Dublin. - Is leaving early tomorrow to go to Welcombe; Bob's father is staying until Wednesday night. Has been very busy packing; the 'soldier boxes' will travel in the carriage. Charlie has written in 'very good spirits': he received good marks for his 'holiday task'. Hopes no more boys have got ring-worm, and asks whether the doctor has been to examine them. He must have had some days with good weather for football; asks if he will soon 'go into the big game'. They hope that some of the [Phoenix Park] murderers have been caught, and will be convicted. Hopes Bob gets on well with [Gerard Henry Craig] Sellar and Alexander. Georgie is very well; he is coming to Welcombe on Tuesday. Bob's father sends his love.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

40 Ennismore Gardens, S.W. - Wanted to visit Bobbie [at school] this week, but since it is Ascot races thinks it will be best to avoid that railway line until next week. Sorry there is whooping cough at the other school, which she expects is Mr Moreton's. Will bring him a pair of cricket shoes; supposes he wants them to have spikes. Asks if he can swim better this year: he should learn to if it does not tire him. It is 'very hot & dusty' in London, but is sure the butterflies are enjoying the weather. Bob's butterfly book has 'come home very nicely bound'; asks whether he wants it at school. Georgie sends his love; she is reading to him about Croesus, which he is enjoying.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Chief Secretary's Lodge, Phoenix Park, Dublin. - Thanks Bobbie for his letter: is very interested to hear about the 'new boys and masters, & who are ill'. They have had 'great gales' recently, but there is frost today. Asks him to send his Sunday letter to Welcombe, as she will leave here early on Monday. They will soon pack up here; the 'soldier boxes' will go into the book box [see also 22/72]. Hopes Bob is enjoying his football. Bob's father attended a levee at the Castle yesterday, and 'carried a big two-handled sword before Lord Spencer [the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland]'; he will carry it again at the drawing room, and she thinks it will be 'very funny'. Asks Bob if he would like any 'crests' sent to him. Will write again soon. Asks if he has got the hymn book.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Someone knocked him under the chin by mistake during football [rugby], which they have now begun to play regularly, and made him bite his tongue 'rather badly'; it is almost better today. Does not know whether his 'privet is alive or dead'. The Douglasses [sons of the Marquess of Queensberry, at Wixenford School with Robert?] have come back.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Is not going to school until Thursday. Booa [Mary Prestwich] thought of taking them to the Zoo today, but the wind is too cold so they are not going. Went to the Baker Street Bazaar; Robert bought his mother a paper basket; Booa bought '6 unbreakable tumblers' and a mat for Sir George's room. Is doing lessons every day with Miss Martin. Mrs Stephenson invited him and Georgie to tea, and to play in the Horticultural Gardens afterwards, but they are not going.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Had to 'go in to the liberary [sic]' on Saturday since it rained. They go butterfly-hunting between four and six on half-holidays. There are '7 hours work [at school]' and he does five; he goes to bed at seven and gets up at half seven in the morning. Everyone says his 'poison bottle [for butterflies] is very strong'; one boy said it 'almost knocked him down'; Archie borrowed it to 'poison a white'. Asks his mother to tell Miss Martin that the 'beautiful brimstone' broke in two when he was putting it in a 'relaxing pot'. Asks if he can have a 'breathing case for caterpillars'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Thanks his mother for the book, stencil plates and cake. News of caterpillars and chrysalises. Guest came second in his exam to go into the Navy. Mr [Ernest] Arnold says Robert may go into the third form in about a week. Played another school [at cricket?] on Friday, who beat them; they are going to play the Farmborough school this week.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

[Gerard Craig?] Sellar came back yesterday. He, [D.R. or W.H.?] Napier, Bright, and Van de vi [Veen?] Porter have been to tea with Mrs Haines; they played in the hayfield before tea, and rounders afterwards. The masters have won a match against the 'big game and the eleven'. The 'grandsons of Runjeetsing [Maharaja Ranjit Singh, ie, the children of Duleep Singh?] were here once'. Some Eton boys who had been at Wixenford came last week and played [cricket] against the eleven last week.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Mrs Barlett [the matron at Wixenford] wants to know whether Robert should continue taking his medicine. There is a boy 'who is a landleager here called Hugo Montgomerie' [Hugh Montgomery]. He goes 'up the backboard' twice a day. The 'fourth class has been destroyed by measels [sic]'.'Gest' [Guest] is the head of the school, who is going to be a mid[shipman]; Borne is at the bottom. Asks her to ask 'Boar' ['Booa': Mary Prestwich] and Miss Martin for his seeds.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

It 'snowed hard last Sunday, and no one could go out'. Has had a stiff neck and cold, but neither have been very bad. Sorry to hear Charlie has a bad cold and hopes he gets better soon; asks Caroline to thank him for his letter. They had a 'grand set out last Tuesday', which they had as half holiday instead of Wednesday. Mrs Lyell and Mrs Stirling came, and they had charades; will tell his mother 'all about it' in the holidays.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Had a match with Cameron [Lovett-Cameron's school at Mortimer?] yesterday, which was a goal-less draw but a good game. Would rather come home on the 2nd as Mr A[rnold] does not like people to leave early, and Robert likes staying for the last day. Has found he has another pair of shoes in his locker. Notes in a postscript that 'the holls [sic: holidays] are very near.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Thanks his mother for her letter. Has read [his father's] "Holiday among some old friends" and "Horace at Athens", which are 'very interesting'; does not think he can understand the others yet. Thinks they will have a match with Mortimer next Saturday week. Hopes Grandpapa [Sir Charles Trevelyan or Robert Philips] and Sophie [Wicksteed?] are better, and that Georgie is well now. Thinks that everyone has recovered from the chicken pox now. Glad that Charlie is getting on well. Has given the note to Mrs Bartlett [the school matron].

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to George Otto Trevelyan

Thanks his father for his letter. Thinks G[eorge] is happy and 'quite at home' [at Wixenford]. Mr Arnold has told Robert to ask Charlie how much he will have to know when he goes to Harrow; wrote to him a few days ago. Likes the Virgil and Euripides' "Iphigenia" very much. Hears that Welldon has been chosen for Harrow [as headmaster]; hopes he is a 'nice man'. He and George are getting on well in their work. Asks his father to thank his mother for her letter and the umbrella. Tomlin 'took Up[p]er Shell'. [Nugent] Hicks is going to Harrow next term. Has written to Grandpapa T[revelyan]. Sends love to all, 'Spider included'.

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