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Stuart, James (1843–1913) MP and Professor of Mechanism, Cambridge University
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Letter from M. A. Lewes (George Eliot) to Henry Sidgwick

Reports that her illness is preventing her from seeing any of her friends. Expresses her desire to 'institute some sort of Educational instrumentality which will be a help to poor students of the subjects in which [her] husband was most interested...to be called by his name.' Seeks advice on this project from Sidgwick and Professor [James?] Stuart. Refers to a report in the Times on the meeting on University Teaching at the Mansion House, and concludes that a greater knowledge of the work of the London Society for the Extension of University Teaching would assist her in her plans. She intends to devote four or five thousand pounds to the purpose. Asks Sidgwick to discuss the matter with Professor Stuart, and with 'any Cambridge man' whom he thinks likely to 'aid with ideas'; mentions Michael Foster as an example. Refers with affection to a letter she received from Sidgwick. Sends her 'best love' to Mrs Sidgwick, and expresses the desire to carry out the project during her lifetime, and not as a matter of bequest.

Cross, Marian (1819-1880), née Evans, author, pseudonym George Eliot

Letter from M. A. Lewes (George Eliot) to Henry Sidgwick

Refers to the letter she received from him as 'a precious light'. Claims that it assisted her with her plans for the institution of a scheme to benefit to poor students. Agrees the 'condition of the Laboratory' to be all-important, and that consideration of the Land in Society should be excluded. Asks Sidgwick for further advice, now that the 'right path' has been struck out. Reports that she is not yet seeing even intimate friends, but is prepared to meet those who can aid her with her project. Refers to the question of which university or college offers the best machinery for the purpose, and also what conditions should be fixed 'as checks on the idle abuse of the studentship'. Expresses the hope that Sidgwick, Professor Stuart, Dr Foster or Frank Balfour will give her some advice when they come to town, and gives details of her availability.

Cross, Marian (1819-1880), née Evans, author, pseudonym George Eliot

Letter from Laura E. Stuart to Nora Sidgwick

Letter [118/1]: Encloses 'a copy of a little magazine', because it contains a reminiscence concerning Henry Sidgwick, which she thought might interest Nora. Sends regards of herself and her husband.

Printed extract from the Carrow Works Magazine [118/2]: including James Stuart's recollection of having drawn up a letter 'to a learned body in Cambridge asking its members to extend its privileges to the outside world.' Gave Henry Sidgwick the draft to read, and the latter's corrections impressed upon him 'the great advantage of not overstating a thing.'

Stuart, Laura Elizabeth (1859-1920) writer, wife of Professor James Stuart

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Asks her to forward [James?] Stuart's address. Reports that he has obtained permission to read in the library in Berlin, and intends to stay some days, after which he plans to go to Halle or Göttingen. Claims that he is reading no English, and that 'the immersion in a different set of words and ideas is entertaining enough', but that the main object of his visit will not be realised. Asks if people are afraid of war in England, and reports that they 'are taking it very coolly' in Berlin, and that the papers 'affect to be amused [with] the French.' Transcribes an advertisement from a German newspaper. Asks her not to read the letters addressed to him, as 'the writers might not like it always', and asks her to just send on all but bills and printed circulars. States that there is a word in Stuart's address that he cannot read, and suggests that perhaps Arthur knows it.

Letter from Mary Sidgwick to Henry Sidgwick

Asks Henry, on behalf of Miss Clough, for his opinion of 'a Mr. James Stuart as to his qualifications for a Lecturer on Historical, literary and scientific subjects', adding that he was mentioned to Miss Clough by Mrs George Butler. Reports on the weather, and to Henry's hay-fever. Says that Arthur is well, and that he enjoyed his Yorkshire visits, where he saw Uncle Robert and Uncle Christopher; he was in Bolton on a lovely day, and was 'charmed with it', and went to Leeds also. Arthur saw Wordsworth Donisthorpe at his father's house, and 'thought him pleasant and clever.'

Thanks Henry for his letter, and refers to his reflections on bachelor life therein. Claims that she would like to have one of Mrs Paul's books some day. Announces that is has just been settled 'at a Master's meeting that a Tercentenary meeting and dinner of Old Rugbeians is to be held at the Town Hall on the 20th June, and that the Speech day is to coincide with it....' Asks Henry if he will come. Reports that Mrs Jex Blake has a seventh daughter [Bertha], and that Mrs [ ] has a daughter also.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

Explains that the reason that he would like her to come to Cambridge is so that she may see Newnham Hall with 'the first bloom on it.' Reports that the house is full, and that everything is going on satisfactorily so far. Assures her that she may come any other time, but informs her that he goes away for the vacation on 10 December. Reports that Edward came up to Cambridge to elect Stuart professor [of Mechanism and Applied Mechanics], but he did not see him, as he was only in town for an hour. Hopes that her dental arrangements 'are going on as well as can be expected', and that her Rogers 'is not the real Rogers'.

Letter from Henry Sidgwick to his mother

[Written in response to 101/174]:- States that he does not think Stuart so good a man as Hales, who is older and has had much more educational experience than the former. Declares that 'if they [Miss Clough and associates working to further female education] do not mind [Stuart's] age...his inexperience, and...want of any special qualification in the way of reading, - in every other respect the choice would be an admirable one.' Refers to his qualities; 'bright, eager, clever', etc.

Does not think he [Henry] shall be able to stand a speech-day and a dinner [at Rugby] on 20 June, 'much as [his] feelings are of course moved by the tercentenary', as he predicts his hay fever shall be bad. Announces his plan of spending a fortnight or so in London around that date, and plans to read at the British Museum in the day-time, and by night to 'prowl about the streets and observe human nature'. Remarks that none of Mrs Paul's novels are in the University Library. Asks her to tell Arthur that he will answer the letter he forwarded. Reports that there is a conspiracy [at Trinity College] now to call him 'A. Sidgwick', which, he remarks, 'is one of the inconveniences of having a brother better known in the world than oneself.'