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Sidgwick, Eleanor Mildred (1845-1936) Principal of Newnham College Cambridge
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Arthur C. Benson to Nora Sidgwick

Reports that the 'N.P.P.' was returned to him the previous night, and he sends her a copy of it [not included]. Declares that he enjoyed very much seeing her the previous day. Remarks that it is such a comfort, 'on this Greek question, to be able to see and to say, without reservation, how foolish and ignorant everyone is who does not agree with oneself.' States that he is glad that she is making progress with the book, [Henry Sidgwick, a Memoir] and looks forward to its publication. Desires that, through it, Henry 'should speak to a wider circle than his letters and talk could do.' Refers to Henry's humility, sympathy and intellectual power.

Benson, Arthur Christopher (1862–1925) poet and college head

Brown envelope with notes

With MS notes, including 'Chiefly about Nora's engagement and wedding and some written afterwards and some letters of mine to her'. Accompanying 105/1-19.

Card from Arthur Sidgwick to Nora Sidgwick

Sends Nora a letter, which seems to him 'a sincere and touching tribute' [not included]. Hopes that she is well, and has had some rest. Explains that he is still tied [to Oxford] by an effort to reduce his arrears. Wishes her well for 1907.

Card from Arthur Sidgwick to Nora Sidgwick

Returns letters [written about Henry Sidgwick: A Memoir; not included], and states that they are all very gratifying. Reminds Nora that 'of the pleasure and the praise 601/633 (exactly)' is hers. Remarks that those by 'ACB[enson], GOT, [James?] Ward, [Sir George] Young, and Tennyson were all good to read, and of course Cornish.' Says that he knew about William Sidgwick of Skipton having given evidence before the Faculty Committee [see 103/94], but that it was outside his drama. Has some duplicates of hers and a few more, and undertakes to send them to her when they reach 'a batch'. Note added in red ink saying that for real criticism they must wait for 'the unbribed Reviewer', but that 'it is a great thing to please the old friends'.

Sidgwick, Arthur (1840–1920), educationist and classical scholar

Card from Arthur Sidgwick to Nora Sidgwick

Thanks Nora for the reviews of Henry Sidgwick: A Memoir, which he returns to her [not included]. Agrees that the people who did not know Henry or his work are the people who disapprove of the book. Adds that they could not accommodate everybody. Also returns [letters from] J.B. Mayor, 'O[scar] B[rowning]' and Lady Rayleigh [not included]. Lists the publications from which he has reviews of the book, and undertakes to send Nora any that she has not got. Has already given away five copies of the book, and has 'not quite finished yet'.

Sidgwick, Arthur (1840–1920), educationist and classical scholar

Copy letter from Henry Sidgwick to Elizabeth Bryce

Typewritten copy of letter. Her letter has just reached him at Var on their return from the island [the Île Roubaud]. Regrets that he and Nora will not be able to join her, as they have two necessary visits in Switzerland, and he must be in England again on 17 September. He and Nora are to attend two more 'experimental evenings' [involving Italian medium Eusapia Palladino and some prominent members of the Society for Psychical Research]. Wrote a letter to her husband, James Bryce, the previous morning, but fears that it will have just missed him. Their stay has been longer than had been previously anticipated, but believes that the prolongation has been of use. Refers to the Mediterranean island on which they have been staying, which is a delightful place to live, apart from the presence of mosquitoes. Wishes her and her husband a successful tour, and expresses his regret that he and Nora cannot join in it. Sends Nora's kindest remembrances.

Copy letter from Henry Sidgwick to Helen Gladstone

Typewritten. Explains that this letter 'is a kind of postscript' to Nora's. Discusses whether or not Gladstone should go to work at an educational establishment for women at Holloway. Has always thought it desirable that Holloway 'should succeed and become a really effective part of the organisation of academic education for women', and refers to it as a place where experiment is desirable. Adds, however, that he does not think that it is interest of the movement for the promotion of women's education that Holloway 'should take the first place and put down Newnham and Girton and the Oxford Colleges into subordinate positions.' Believes that in the future it will be a successful institution for the purposes of examination preparation, but that at Oxford and Cambridge they aim to give to the élite of the students 'the interest in knowledge for its own sake and the independent grasp of the methods by which it is being advanced in different departments'. Believes that this 'can only be given in an institution where an active prosecution of original research and thought is being kept up', and does not think that this can be attained at Holloway. Discusses whether Gladstone's going to Holloway would be a gain to that institution 'sufficient to counterbalance the loss that it would undoubtedly be to Newnham', and finds it difficult to say. From a personal point of view wishes her to stay at Newnham, but urges her not to be influence by any sense of obligation.

Copy letter from Henry Sidgwick to James Bryce

Typewritten copy. Thanks Bryce for his criticisms [of Sidgwick's Elements of Politics?]: will think over his advice in relation to the last chapter. If he does not take Bryce's advice, will introduce his '"questiuncules" with an apology'; he will also add a statement on his view of the question of sovereignty. Confesses that he despairs of the general reader, but undertakes to think over Bryce's suggestions. Says he has little to say of concrete interest, and that to conceal his 'barrenness of practical wisdom', he takes refuge in analysis. Sends the spare proof of chapter thirty-one [not included]. States that he is inclined to agree with him that the legal and practical questions have been confused in the discussion. Adds that he and Nora were sorry to miss the Bryces on the previous Sunday.

Copy letter from Henry Sidgwick to James Bryce

Typewritten copy. Believes that he is 'progressing in convalescence', but is having his 'ups and down '. Has read with much interest the report that Bryce sent, and thinks it to be 'decidedly improved' by the additions. Awaits the result with interest. Presumes that the report will be published at some stage, and asserts that 'even if the Council decides against action, it will be a good thing to have some discussion of the matter....' He and Nora return to London for a day or two on the following Monday or Tuesday, and then go to the Rayleighs for a few days, and then to Cambridge. Adds that 'it still seems very uncertain what degree of working faculty' he shall get back to when his convalescence is completed.

Copy letter from Henry Sidgwick to James Bryce

Typewritten copy. Nora hoped to have had an opportunity yesterday to explain to Bryce the sudden change in their foreign travel plans. There is a crisis impending in the affairs of the Society for Psychical Research: three chief members of their group of investigators, F.W.H. Myers, O. J. Lodge and Richet, 'have convinced themselves of the truth of the physical phenomena of Spiritualism', and have been experimenting with an Italian medium called Eusapia Palladino on a small island in the Mediterranean. The Society has for some years had a reputation for 'comparative sanity', and fears for it now if its most representative men 'come forward as believers.' He and Nora, therefore, feel bound to accept Richet's invitation to go to the Île Roubaud and, if possible, obtain personal experience. The length of their stay is indefinite, but they hope to have time to go to Switzerland afterwards. Suggests that Bryce send him a postcard when his plans are fixed. Gives his address on the island, and undertakes to write to Bryce from there. They intend to return to Cambridge on the following Saturday.

Copy letter from Henry Sidgwick to Lady Victoria Welby-Gregory

Typewritten copy of letter dated 19 January 1894. Decided not to send her paper to [Bernard] Bosanquet because he believed that there was a danger of his not understanding the exact aim of the criticism. Offers to send it, but suggests that if [Samuel] Alexander knows him and could see him it might be better to give it to Bosanquet through him. Is glad to hear that she is well enough 'to go on with this laborious task.' Sends greetings from Nora, who is in the midst of organising domestic matters, from which he says he takes refuge 'in Philosophy.'

Gregory, Lady Victoria Alexandrina Maria Louisa Welby- (1837-1912) Lady Welby, philosopher

Copy letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mrs Clough

Typewritten. Regrets that he cannot put into his review [of A. H. Clough's Remains, for the Westminster Review] any notice of Symonds. Explains that the rule he tries to observe in anonymous writing is to write always of people exactly as he should do if he knew nothing of them. Since he hardly speaks of the edition at all, it would not be natural for him even to mention Symonds. In relation to another point that Clough had asked him about, states that he has altered a sentence in which refers to Mr Palgrave's preface to an edition to Clough's poem, and quotes it as it now stands, claiming that it is 'a very mild retort for the poem in the Spectator'. Refers to the death of his friend J.B. Payne. Hopes that Clough's children enjoy themselves on the Tenby sands, where he himself used to play nearly thirty years previously.

MS note by Nora Sidgwick: 'This letter did not reach us till the biography was printed off'.

Copy letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mrs Clough

Typewritten. Thanks Clough for her new year's wishes. Since returning to Cambridge he has been making arrangements for the 'Lectures for Ladies'. Has discovered that it is much more easy to offend women than men. Encloses a programme [not included] which should demonstrate how they are extending their operations. They are now trying to arrange for the accommodation of girls 'who are gradually dropping in or proposing to drop in from other places.'

Refers to her tour, and reports that in September he came to England instead of going back from Switzerland to Germany. In relation to the Franco-Prussian war, his sympathies are thoroughly French, but he cannot join in the attacks on the Germans. Feels profoundly disappointed in Germany, which he had regarded as a nation advanced in morality; it is the liberals with whom he is most indignant, as the German Tories 'know no better'. The German liberals 'swallowed their constitutional principles in 1866...but they have now eaten their international principles too'. Hopes to see her in London, and expresses regret about 'Miss Clough's school'. Asks to be remembered to her, and to Mr and Mrs Smith [her parents?].

MS note by Nora Sidgwick: 'This letter did not reach us till the biography was printed off'.

Copy letter from Henry Sidgwick to Mrs Clough

Typewritten. Thanks her for sending him 'a copy of Clough's Remains'. Explains that he asked for it through [Godfrey?] Lushington because 'to no one, out of the range of his personal friendships, could Clough be an object of more intense individual interest than to' him [Henry]. Declares the great value he places on Clough's poems, and calls him 'the one true disciple of Wordsworth, with a far deeper interest than Wordsworth in the fundamental problems of human life, and a more subtle, more cultivated intellect.' Speaks of Clough's blending of irony and sympathy in his poetry, and his 'judicial fairness in balancing conflicting influences'. States that the volume sent to him will be very precious to him.

MS note by Nora Sidgwick: 'This letter did not reach us till the biography was printed off'.

D. Neligan to Nora Sidgwick

It was with 'a sense of crushing loss' that she read of the 'wholly unexpected announcement' of Henry Sidgwick's death. First learned to appreciate Henry through her niece, who was his pupil. Predicts that he 'will live long in the hearts of those who knew him, and this is not to die.' Assures Nora that she is one of the many who mourn with her.

Neligan, Dorinda (1833-1914) headmistress and suffragette

Draft MS lectures on Shakespeare

Marked in red crayon A, B, C, F and J, with accompanying explanatory pages. Lectures contain emendations, annotations and amendments. Lecture on Coriolanus accompanied by a letter dated 22 November 1909 from A.W. Verrall to Mrs Sidgwick. Lectures and notes are accompanied by an envelope labelled 'Henry Sidgwick Shakespearean Lectures', with notes on lectures A-J inclusive. With envelope.

Sidgwick, Henry (1838–1900), philosopher

Henry Sidgwick: notebook containing additions incorporated in the sixth edition of Methods of Ethics

Note on first page by E[leanor] M[ildred] Sidgwick explaining that Methods of Ethics was being revised when Henry Sidgwick died, and that the 'additions etc are in his handwriting and have been bound [she thinks] by Miss E. C[onstance] Jones who helped him with the revision and completed it after his death'.

Sidgwick, Henry (1838–1900), philosopher

Letter card from Alexandrina Mayor to Nora Sidgwick

Forgot to mention in her last letter [104/69] that Mr Aldis Wright was the other member of the original group making up the Philosophical Society [later the Grote Society]. States that her husband will write to her when he arrives home.

Mayor, Alexandrina Jessie (1830-1927) wife of Joseph Bickersteth Mayor

Letter from A. Campbell Fraser to Henry Sidgwick

In relation to Locke's Essays, states that it is difficult to name a satisfactory edition. Suggests that the fourth edition - published in 1700 - might be taken as the standard. Mentions a four-volume edition of Locke's works, by Law, published in 1777. Sends his regards to Mrs Sidgwick.

Fraser, Alexander Campbell (1819-1914) philosopher

Letter from A. Dorothea Sanger (née Pease) to Nora Sidgwick

Does not wish to intrude upon Nora, but wishes her to know what a real personal sorrow she feels at the death of Henry Sidgwick. It was he more than any other person who made Cambridge what it was and is to her: 'a source of the best sort of inspiration', which she got from his lectures. Says that he made her love him personally, 'as well as almost reverence him.' Adds that her husband wishes Nora to know that he too 'had all this feeling for Dr. Sidgwick'.

Sanger, Anna Dorothea (1865-1955) wife of Charles Percy Sanger

Letter from Albert Venn Dicey to Nora Sidgwick

Writes on the death of Henry Sidgwick. Assures her what a terrible loss it is to him, and of how great a value to him Henry's friendship and advice have been over the years. Claims that he was 'the most truthful, the most searching and the most sympathetic of critics', and then when he was last at Cambridge he read through Henry's article on Bentham in the Fortnightly [Review], and looked forward to discuss it with him. Claims that he was 'all a professor ought to be and can be in England', and how he himself, and many others, have profited from Henry's example, and trusts it may continue to help him while he teaches at Oxford. Claims that he owes thanks mainly to Henry for 'the Cambridge L. L. D.', and that the latter gave him [Dicey] encouragement when he was out of heart about his work. Also expresses his thanks to Nora and Henry for their having come to him [and his wife] for the previous Ad. Eundem meeting, and realises now that that visit to Oxford 'must have been a fearful strain and effort'. Mentions with fondness 'the Sunday with Sidgwick and...the bright meeting to hear his essay on Green.' Claims that these memories, and his last few minutes of conversation with him in London will now remain with him as cherished memories. Concludes that Henry's life 'has been a joy as well as a blessing' to all who knew him.

Dicey, Albert Venn (1835-1922) jurist

Letter from Albert Venn Dicey to Nora Sidgwick

Thanks her for the copy of Henry Sidgwick: a Memoir, which he has just received. Is sure that it will 'be of such intense interest to any one who cares for originality and beauty of character....' Does not believe, however, that any writing 'can convey all that made [Henry's] conversation so delightful to his friends.' Asks her to send him the letters from him to Henry, to which Nora refers, and states that he shall probably destroy them. Presumes that they are mainly about Home Rule, and remarks that he doubts that the Union will now be maintained. States that he will probably be in Cambridge the following term, and hopes to meet her.

Dicey, Albert Venn (1835-1922) jurist

Letter from Albert Venn Dicey to Nora Sidgwick

Reports that he has just received a 'cheering account' of Henry Sidgwick's progress from H. Jackson, and so ventures to write to her. Assures her of how grieved he has been 'in common with so many other friends...at Sidgwick's illness and the consequent resignation of his professorship, and of the value he and others place on Henry's friendship. Thanks her for her letter to his wife, in which she refers to his having undergone the operation successfully. Refers to the Sunday that the Sidgwicks spent with them as one of two or three days in his life which he would not have missed for anything, but fears that it must have been 'a day of fearful anxiety and depression' for them. Sends Henry his love, and asks her to tell him that all his friends are thinking of him and hoping to see him again. Apologises for having typed the letter, claiming that his writing is illegible.

Dicey, Albert Venn (1835-1922) jurist

Letter from Alexandrina Mayor to Nora Sidgwick

Writes to express her and her husband's [J.B. Mayor's] sympathy to Nora on the death of Henry Sidgwick. Says that they have been sad to know that the end was approaching, and have felt very much for Nora. Declares that her husband 'grieves sorely over the loss to Cambridge and to the world besides this private loss to himself of a friend on whose kindness and judgment he was even now relying with regard to the publication of [her] uncle's new vol[ume] [John Grote's Exploratio Philosophica: Part II], and that he intends to write to her himself.

Mayor, Alexandrina Jessie (1830-1927) wife of Joseph Bickersteth Mayor

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