Mostrando 86 resultados

Descripción archivística
Fondo
Imprimir vista previa Ver :

2 resultados con objetos digitales Muestra los resultados con objetos digitales

Papers of Richard Monckton Milnes, Lord Houghton

  • HOUG
  • Fondo
  • 1779-1951

Houghton's archive includes: Cambridge papers, 1827-1830; a voluminous correspondence; literary papers; publications, 1834-1873; political papers, 1837-1880s; business papers; papers relating to travels, 1828-1885, papers relating to clubs and societies; commonplace books, 1838-1865; press cuttings, 1801-1878; diaries of Lady Houghton, 1855-72; papers of Houghton’ father R. P. Milnes; other family papers.

Milnes, Richard Monckton (1809-1885), 1st Baron Houghton, author and politician

Papers of Sir Peter Shaffer

  • SHAF
  • Fondo
  • 1940-2016

The papers consist of correspondence, writings, diaries, photographs, and printed material which document the life and work of playwright Sir Peter Levin Shaffer.

Shaffer, Sir Peter Levin (1926–2016), knight, playwright

Pethick-Lawrence Papers

  • PETH
  • Fondo
  • 1825-1970

This collection contains the surviving contents of the Pethick-Lawrences’ correspondence files, including letters from, and copies of letters to, a wide range of politicians and public figures; papers relating to the Lawrence family and the early life of F. W. Lawrence; articles and scripts of talks by Lord Pethick-Lawrence; correspondence between the Pethick-Lawrences themselves; papers of Lady Constance Lytton; papers relating to the separation of the Pethick-Lawrences from the Women’s Social and Political Union; and papers relating to prison conditions. The collection contains particularly notable material on the subjects of Indian independence, the suffrage movement, and other aspects of social reform.

Lawrence, Frederick William Pethick- (1871-1961), 1st Baron Pethick-Lawrence, politician

Papers of Lord Layton

  • LAYT
  • Fondo
  • 1902-1966

The papers consist of correspondence, writings, printed material, documents, photographs and other materials covering all aspects of Layton's career and interests. Amongst them are papers about the setting up of the Ministry of Munitions in World War I, and the Ministry of Production in World War II; reparations negotiations; the development of 'The Economist' and the 'News Chronicle'; the first conference of the League of Nations after World War I; the beginnings of the Council of Europe; the Simon Commission; and the Liberal Industrial Enquiry.

Layton, Walter Thomas (1884–1966), 1st Baron Layton, economist and newspaper proprietor

Papers of Sir Henry Babington Smith

  • SMIH
  • Fondo
  • 1833-1942

The archive contains school and University papers 1871-1905, diaries 1881-94, Education Department and Treasury papers 1883-93. Papers relating to India 1891-1904, the Natal finance 1899-1900, the Ottoman public debt 1893-09, the General Post office 1903-09, the National Bank of Turkey 1903-17, the Royal Commission on the Civil Service 1912-15, wartime finance and trade 1915-21, the Indian Exchange and Currency Committee 1914-20 and the Railways Amalgamation Tribunal 1921-23. Correspondence 1873-1923. Papers of Lady Elisabeth Mary Babington Smith 1894-1935. Bruce family correspondence 1861-1938.

Smith, Sir Henry Babington (1863–1923), knight, civil servant and financier

Papers of Robert Calverley Trevelyan and Elizabeth Trevelyan

  • TRER
  • Fondo
  • 1865-1958

The archive contains papers of both Robert Calverley Trevelyan and his wife Elizabeth (née des Amorie van der Hoeven, known as Bessie), though the majority relate to R. C. Trevelyan and comprise personal items 1872-1951, publications 1898-1950, publications 1989-1950, reviews of publications 1898-1953, photographs 1876-1949, family material.

This archive is in the process of being catalogued: the majority of the correspondence has been catalogued at item level, while around fifteen boxes predominantly containing working notebooks and photographs remain; work on these and revisions will follow.

Trevelyan, Robert Calverley (1872-1951), poet, dramatist, and translator

Papers of William Whewell

  • WHWL*
  • Fondo
  • [16th]-19th cent.

The papers consist of correspondence, diaries, subject files, writings, other Whewell papers, family papers, and later papers of others. The family papers include those originally gathered by Whewell's first wife Cordelia (née Marshall) and his second wife Lady Affleck (née Ellis). The papers of Lady Affleck's brother and Whewell's friend Robert Leslie Ellis now form a subset of this collection.

Whewell, William (1794-1866), college head and writer on the history and philosophy of science

Mayor Papers

  • MAYR
  • Fondo
  • 1664-1949

The Mayor Papers comprise papers of three intermarried families, the Mayors, Grotes and Bickersteths, all of whom had some connection with Cambridge. The vast majority of the material is correspondence with family and friends on subjects such as health, bereavement, faith and the like.

The earliest member of the Mayor family represented in the papers is John Mayor, vicar of Shawbury in Shropshire. Of his sons, Joseph became a Fellow of St John's College, Cambridge and later Rector of South Collingham in Nottinghamshire. Another son, Robert, became a missionary for the Church Missionary Society and spent much of the 1820s in Ceylon (Sri Lanka) with his wife Elizabeth Bickersteth, before returning to England and eventually becoming Rector of Acton near Nantwich. Robert and Charlotte's missionary work and their life in Ceylon is well represented in the archive by many detailed letters home to family.

Three of Robert and Elizabeth's sons became Fellows of St John's, Robert Bickersteth Mayor, who later became Mathematical Master at Rugby and Rector of Frating, John Eyton Bickersteth Mayor, who was University Librarian and Professor of Latin at Cambridge and Joseph Bickersteth Mayor, who became Professor of Classics at King's College, London. Their letters home and to each other give a vivid view of college life in the mid-nineteenth century. Joseph Bickersteth Mayor married Alexandrina Jessie Grote, and their children included Robert John Grote Mayor, always known as 'Robin', Fellow of King's College, Cambridge, and Flora MacDonald Mayor, author.

The Grote family came over to England in the eighteenth century. By profession they were bankers and a few early letters of Andreas, Joseph and George Grote senior are preserved, giving some idea of their banking business and financial links to mainland Europe. George sen. married Selina Mary Peckwell, establishing a link with the Peckwell, Blossett, de Salis and Le Coq St. Leger families. They had 11 children, the eldest of which, George, followed the family business before becoming MP for the City of London and later writing a history of Ancient Greece. Four of his brothers joined the Indian civil service; one, Andrew, married Isabella Macdonald and the correspondence with members of this family give a view of nineteenth century Scottish life. Another brother, John, was a Fellow of Trinity College, Knightbridge Professor of Moral Philosophy, and vicar of Trumpington.

Much of the correspondence representing the Bickersteth family is from Henry and Elizabeth Bickersteth to their son John Bickersteth, a student at Trinity and later vicar of Acton. Henry and his son Robert were surgeons in Liverpool, and there is comment both on life in Liverpool and in Kirkby Lonsdale, Henry Bickersteth's original home. There are also some letters from Edward Bickersteth, secretary of the Church Missionary Society, and Henry Bickersteth, Baron Langdale, Master of the Rolls. Robert, Edward, and Henry the younger were brothers of Robert Mayor's wife Charlotte.

The Mayor family

Papers of Sir Richard Claverhouse Jebb

  • JEBB
  • Fondo
  • 1874–1905

The archive comprises Jebb's 'Servanda': scrapbooks of material 'to be kept'. Press clippings, correspondence, printed parliamentary and academic material, ephemera and so on are pasted in to numbered pages, sometimes with MS annotations by Jebb; loose material, such as correspondence, is interleaved. The first volumes are disbound and have been weeded, with remaining pages preserved in paper wrappings within 'transfer cases'.

Transfer case 1 contains papers from 'Servanda' scrapbooks I (Jul 1876-Nov 1879, with loose letter from 1874), II (Jan 1880–Nov 1881) and III (Nov 1881-Apr 1883); separate gatherings in paper covers also seem to have come from this volume: Nov 1881, ‘Mahuffy v R.C.J. (scant contents)’, ‘R.C.J.’s Life of Bentley’, 1882; ‘Controversy with Sayce, 1881-1882’; Transfer case 2 contains papers from 'Servanda' scrapbooks IV (Nov 1883-Jun 1884) and V; Transfer case 3 contains much loose material and scrapbook pages, presumably from 'Servanda' VI and VII, as well as papers from 'Servanda' VIII (1889).

The intact 'Servanda' volumes cover the following dates: IX, Mar 1890-Oct 1891; X, Oct 1891-Oct 1893; XI, Oct 1893-Aug 1894; XIA, 1894-Jun 1896; XII, Sept 1894-Nov 1896; XIII, Nov 1896-Jul 1898; XIV, Jul 1898-Jul 1899; XV, Jul 1899-May 1900; XVI, Jun 1900-Mar 1902; XVII, Mar 1902-Jul 1903.

There are also two bound volumes both labelled 'Newspaper Cuttings', one containing similar material to that contained in the 'Servanda' scrapbooks from 1903-1905, the other containing press cuttings relating to Jebb's death, letters regarding this mainly to Lady Jebb, material relating to Jebb's funeral service, and reviews of his edition of Bacchylides (1905-1906).

Jebb, Sir Richard Claverhouse (1841–1905), knight, Greek scholar

Papers of Sir Geoffrey Taylor (G. I. Taylor)

  • TAYL
  • Fondo
  • 1777–1975

These surviving records are variable - even capricious - in content and time-span, for reasons inherent in Taylor's temperament, interests and methods of work. For most of his career he held research posts, especially the Yarrow Research Professorship of the Royal Society, to which he was appointed in 1923; he was thus almost wholly absolved from routine teaching, administrative, departmental or institutional tasks, and free to pursue whatever research suggested itself, or was suggested to him. He had the help of his technician, Walter Thompson, and a room in the Cavendish Laboratory, originally made available by Rutherford, who described Taylor as being 'paid provided he does no work'. This lack of formal establishment obligations, though ideal for Taylor's research, meant that he had no office or secretarial help. He worked with rough notes and drawings, often on any piece of paper that came to hand; even when he used a notebook of more conventional kind, the content is somewhat heterogeneous and lacks dates or headings (see B.2, B.3, for examples). Several of the official committee reports in Section C originally took the form of personal letters which were then typed out in a more acceptable official style (see, for example, C.37, C.41, C.42, C.45, C.49, C.50). Conversely, several letters in Section D are statements of research in progress, and were typed up and used as such by the recipients. Furthermore, it should be remembered that Taylor did much work at home at `Farmfield', whence most of the surviving letters are addressed.

The general consequences of these conditions of work are often mentioned in biographical articles about Taylor, and are best summarised by Batchelor in his Memoir (Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society, 22, 1976), p.597

Perhaps I should explain here that, so far as I know, at no time in his life did Taylor employ a secretary or have his letters typed. The documentary evidence of what he did throughout his life consists wholly of incoming letters and papers (including, of course, his own in published form), and since his filing system was rudimentary, and dependent more on his wife's wish to contain the papers in one room than on his need to find something later, I am sure there are some gaps. He did make an effort to retain one copy of every published paper in a set of boxes, but typed or duplicated reports, by him or by someone else, often remained in the envelopes in which they were delivered, and incoming letters were collected in large brown envelopes marked only with the year. Periodically Stephanie had a clearing-up operation which led to some documents being thrown out in order to make room for new ones, and few of the letters and documents that come in before about 1960 have survived.

The result is that very little now survives by way of notebooks, experimental records or laboratory observations to document Taylor's scientific research (see Section B). In order to supplement these scanty resources, Batchelor assembled from some of Taylor's correspondents copies of letters which might permit the reconstruction of a collaborative piece of research, joint publication or substantial scientific discussion. Successful examples of this enterprise are enumerated in the introduction to Section D and itemised in the relevant entries. Because of the paucity of surviving material by Taylor himself, a list of all items in that Section which include his letters or draft replies to correspondents is also given in the introduction to Section D. In addition, Batchelor assembled many of the reports and committee papers by Taylor, and these, together with other drafts and papers found in the collection, constitute the considerable body of unpublished work brought together in Section C.

A word may be said here about Taylor's handwriting. Although he wrote a fairly standard legible hand until about 1913 (see the manuscript of the Adams Prize Essay in C.2), the `Scotia' notebook of the same year (see B.1) is in the characteristic script, resembling the waves and eddies it often describes, of most of his subsequent letters and papers. It has certain similarities with his mother's hand, especially in her later years, and is not easy to read. Most of the recipients of his letters had typed copies made.

The personal material in Section A includes documents relating to a little known episode in 1911 when Taylor was obliged to spend several months in a sanatorium with a lung infection (see A.17 - A.23), and a considerable amount of information relating to Taylor's family, and particularly to the Boole connection. Taylor's mother, Margaret, was the second of the five daughters of George Boole, and Taylor both inherited and contributed to a sense of family continuity (see especially A.79 - A.135 and introductory note). The numerous photographs in E.1 - E.15 are a useful additional record of Taylor's family, career, travels and interests.

Probably the most widely known of Taylor's achievements is the CQR anchor. Material relating to this can be found in A.157, A.160, B.6, C.22, C.23, C.79, D.26, D.63, E.14.

Taylor, Sir Geoffrey Ingram (1886–1975), knight, physicist and engineer

Papers of Sir Walter Lamb (W. R. M. Lamb)

  • LAMB
  • Fondo
  • 1882-1961

Diaries 1867-1960 (mostly relating to Royal Academy business), correspondence

Lamb, Sir Walter Rangeley Maitland (1882–1961), knight, classicist and Secretary of the Royal Academy of Arts

Myers Papers

  • MYER
  • Fondo
  • 1796–1979

The archive consists in the greater part of correspondence of Frederic and Eveleen Myers (1840s-1930s) but also contains Frederic Myers' diaries (1843-97) and notebooks (1861-81), notes and discussions on psychical research, family memorabilia and photographs and papers relating to L. H. Myers including papers relating to the publication of The Pool of Vishnu, poems and autobiographical notes (20th cent).

Myers, Frederic William Henry (1843–1901), psychical researcher and essayist

Additional Manuscripts a

  • Add. MS a
  • Fondo
  • 17th-21st c.

The additional manuscript series are artificial groupings, mostly of single items or very small archival entities, but in some cases large archives have been inserted in these series.

Trinity College Library, Cambridge

Additional Manuscripts b

  • Add. MS b
  • Fondo
  • 16th-20th c.

The additional manuscript series are artificial groups containing manuscripts from various sources. Most of the contents are single items or small groups, but they include some fairly large personal archives, either arranged in sequence or scattered in various places. See the overview of the collections (https://archives.trin.cam.ac.uk/index.php/overview).

Trinity College Library, Cambridge

Papers of Ludwig Wittgenstein

  • WITT
  • Fondo
  • 1914-1951

The largest surviving portion of Wittgenstein's nachlass containing his working papers 1914-1951

Wittgenstein, Ludwig Josef Johann (1889-1951), philosopher

Additional Manuscripts c

  • Add. MS c
  • Fondo
  • 13th-20th c.

The additional manuscript series are artificial groups containing manuscripts from various sources. Most of the contents are single items or small groups, but they include some fairly large personal archives, either arranged in sequence or scattered in various places. See the overview of the collections (https://archives.trin.cam.ac.uk/index.php/overview).

Trinity College Library, Cambridge

Additional Manuscripts d

  • Add. MS d
  • Fondo
  • 18th-20th cent

The additional manuscript series are artificial groups containing manuscripts from various sources. Most of the contents are single items or small groups, but they include some fairly large personal archives, either arranged in sequence or scattered in various places. See the overview of the collections (https://archives.trin.cam.ac.uk/index.php/overview).

Trinity College Library, Cambridge

Papers of A. S. F. Gow

  • GOW
  • Fondo
  • 1887–1978

Personal material of A. S. F. Gow is catalogued under (A): this includes early biographical material he compiled for his nephew Sir Michael Gow, two photograph albums, and correspondence, particularly letters (1907-1920) from William Ridgeway. There is also a handwritten biography, perhaps by Gow, of Cyril Mowbray Wells with other material relating to Wells.

Academic papers, (B), include notes on classical texts, (?1928-1951) some for lectures given by Gow, and items found with the notes, as well as part of Gow's dissertation for a Fellowship at Trinity in 1911.

(C) comprises articles by Gow,"A Cambridge Seal Box of the Seventeenth Century" (1934); "Sir Stephen Gaselee, 1882-1943 - a memoir" (1944), with related material including correspondence, press clippings and so on. (E) consists of items removed from the printed books left by Gow to Trinity College Library (now catalogued under the shelfmark GOW), including correspondence, photographs, press clippings and reviews.

Material related to A. E. Housman (F) includes Gow's "A. E. Housman - a biographical sketch" (1936), along with related items such as corrections, reviews (1936-1938) and correspondence (1936-1963); a letter to J. W. Mackail by Housman, 25 Aug 1922, with a draft copy of his "Last Poems" and comments on it, and portrait sketches of Housman, some inscribed to him by William Rothenstein. There are also newspaper reviews of Housman's inaugural lecture as Professor of Latin at University College (1892, published in 1937) and of his edition of Manilius (1938). Items relating to Housman removed from printed books left by Gow to the Library also fall under this class; several of these are letters from the authors of books on Housman to Gow, such as Laurence Housman, Percy Withers, John Carter and Henry Maas.

Items related to academic societies and institutions fall under the (G) class: reports by the Society for the Promotion of Hellenic Studies (1899-1904) and the British School at Rome (1904-1919); accounts of excavations in Cyprus from the Journal of Hellenic Studies (1887-1891).

Finally, there are six bound volumes with Gow's bookplate (H) containing transcripts of Housman's lectures. Five are typescript: three transcripts of Housman's notes now in Cambridge University Library, "The Application of Thought to Textual Criticism" (containing note of thanks to Gow from 'B[ertram] G[oulding] B[rown]), "Ovid, Heroides I-IV" and "Ovid, Heroides VI-XII" (with additional MS notes by Gow); "Horace, Odes I-III" (transcript of notes taken at Housman's lectures by S. L. Franklyn in 1932, corrections from Housman's lecture notes by B. Goulding Brown 1940-1941); "Plautus, Captivi" (transcript of Housman's notes lent to assessors in the Classical Tripos part II, 1932). The last volume contains MS lecture notes by Gow on Housman's "The Application of Thought to Textual Criticism" (1292), "Notes on Martial", and an index; loose inside, a printed sheet of extracts from Manilius', with M. S. additions in pencil, and M.S. notes by Housman.

Gow, Andrew Sydenham Farrar (1886–1978), classical scholar

Papers of A. J. Munby and Hannah Cullwick

  • MUNB
  • Fondo
  • 1850s-1907

Diaries of Arthur Munby 1859-98, diaries of visits to Hannah 1885-1907, notebooks 1864-87, Hannah’s diaries 1854-73, letters from Hannah to Munby 1870-1907, manuscripts of Munby’s poetry, manuscript of Faithful Servants, albums of photographs and cartes de visite 1850s-1900s

Munby, Arthur Joseph (1828-1910), diarist and civil servant

Manuscripts in Printed Books

  • MSPB
  • Fondo
  • 1791-1955

Most of the items included in this category are letters, and most are connected with the publications into which they are inserted.

Trinity College Library, Cambridge

Papers of Robert Robson

  • ROBS
  • Fondo
  • 1936–91

These papers mainly comprise publications, notes, and correspondence relating to aspects of Trinity College history. There are also papers of College committees of which Robson was a member and drafts of unpublished works.

Robson, Robert (1929–1995), historian

Papers of C. D. Broad, Part I

  • BROD
  • Fondo
  • 1903-1971

Although there is some useful autobiographical material including diaries and family correspondence among the papers, the bulk of the material relates to Broad's working life. The detailed faculty lectures, many of which were later published, are preserved as are other lectures that Broad gave from time to time. Notes of the works of others are also among the papers, with Broad's comments, but little of Broad's own notes in preparation for his lectures and publications survive. There are also eight undated notebooks on subjects related to psychical research. Additionally, there are a few classical papers of Arthur Verrall, which Broad was presumably given due to the SPR connection with the family and some papers of John Chadwick on mathematical and philosophical subjects

Broad, Charlie Dunbar (1887-1971), philosopher

Manuscripts in Wren Class O

  • O.
  • Fondo
  • 18th–20th c.

Class O is the repository of the Gale collection of manuscripts, donated to the library in 1738 by Roger Gale, the son of Dr Thomas Gale. This collection was described in 1902 by M. R. James in the preface to volume III of his catalogue of Western manuscripts in Trinity College Library which may be viewed online at https://mss-cat.trin.cam.ac.uk/manuscripts/uv/view.php?n=vol.3#?c=0&m=0&s=0&cv=0&xywh=-338%2C0%2C5011%2C3341. A searchable version of the James catalogue may be found online at https://mss-cat.trin.cam.ac.uk/.

The manuscripts listed in this catalogue were placed in Class O in the Wren Library on shelves not otherwise occupied by the Gale collection. They consist of a mix of single items and small archival entities, with materials which form a part of larger collections housed elsewhere. It should be noted that there are gaps in the numbering scheme of items on the shelves, and that the cataloguing of these materials is a work in progress.

Trinity College Library, Cambridge

Papers of Lord Adrian

  • ADRN
  • Fondo
  • c 1910-1978

The papers contain faculty and special lectures, academic correspondence, scientific notebooks, letters and papers as Master of Trinity and President of the Royal Society, papers relating to the Natural Sciences Club, papers relating to the Cambridge Post-Expressionist exhibition and the diaries of Hester Adrian.

Adrian, Edgar Douglas (1889–1977), 1st Baron Adrian, physiologist

Manuscripts in Wren Class R

  • R.
  • Fondo
  • 16th–20th c.

Class R is the Wren Library repository of manuscripts for all those works which could not be classed as theological. As a consequence, the class is a miscellaneous assortment representing many fields, particularly history, poetry, philosophy, law, natural science, medicine, and music. The contents of Class R were described in 1901 by M. R. James in the preface to volume II of his catalogue of Western manuscripts in Trinity College Library, which may be viewed online: https://mss-cat.trin.cam.ac.uk/manuscripts/uv/view.php?n=vol.2#?c=0. A searchable version of the James catalogue may be found online: https://mss-cat.trin.cam.ac.uk/

The manuscripts listed in this catalogue are those modern manuscripts in R with strong connections to materials housed elsewhere in the library, particularly in Additional Manuscripts. Where James did not provide a description in his catalogue, a description has been provided. Where the James catalogue entry is detailed, a pointer record has been created in this catalogue to highlight the entry in the James catalogue. It should be noted that there are gaps in the numbering scheme of items on the shelves, and that the cataloguing of these materials is a work in progress.

Trinity College Library, Cambridge

Papers of C. W. King

  • KING
  • Fondo
  • 19th cent

The archive is divided into 5 classes. Papers relating to works published by King (Section A), other archaeological and antiquarian material (B), correspondence (C), personal papers (D) and family papers (E)

King, Charles William (1818–1888), writer on gemstones

Papers of Robert Burn

  • BURN
  • Fondo
  • 1862–1901

The majority of the papers in this collection are flysheets (A) dealing with issues debated before the Senate, and as such form a valuable insight into subjects and opinions considered important in late nineteenth century Cambridge. Many of these, such as the accounts of various graces on compulsory Greek or reforms to the Classical Tripos, are concerned with Burn's personal academic preoccupations, but it is a measure of his versatility and dedication to the University as a whole that this collection also contains papers written by him on such questions as the plausibility of introducing degrees in Science and the necessity of widening the Cam to facilitate rowing. Also included are papers on matters of national importance, such as the University Tests Bill and the Oxford Declaration, both of which caused heated debate in the Senate and were of particular interest to Burn as a clergyman.

Another interesting feature of this collection is that the authors of many of the flysheets to be found within it are such important University figures of the last century. Jebb, Jackson and Sidgwick, amongst many others, were concerned with fighting their corner on various issues that came before the Senate, and it is through their opinions that it is possible to glimpse the origins of many events and practices (the building of the New Museums or the establishment of the Historical Tripos, to name just two) that became a reality.

The remainder of this collection consists of mark books (B) for the Classical Tripos 1862, when Burn was an examiner, and miscellaneous items (C) preserved along with the collection. The mark books are of particular importance for those interested in the history of Classics at Cambridge, as well as in its main figures: Jebb, for example, is described in a note by Burn as being better at historical prose than philosophical. Amongst the miscellanea are also items which betray the interests of Burn, but also have a much wider appeal, such as architectural plans of excavations at Rome, and accounts of lectures on Roman Art given at Rugby School.

See the attached finding aid for a more detailed description.

Burn, Robert (1829–1904), classical scholar and archaeologist

Papers of Dame Rose Macaulay

  • MACR
  • Fondo
  • [1794]-1972

This collection relates to Constance Babington Smith's research for her editions of Rose Macaulay's Letters to a Friend (1961), Last Letters to a Friend (1962), Letters to a Sister (1964), and her biography, Rose Macaulay (1972) and is arranged in the following categories:

Family background, letters, diaries and so on, original material 1865-1972, with copies of items dating from 1794 onwards. 121 items;

Family photographs, 1873-1960, watercolours, Rose Macaulay's address book and Christmas card list, 1944 onwards, with associated material. 266 items;

Material concerning Rose Macaulay, such as research, letters and reviews, 1959-1973, including copies of earlier material by Constance Babington Smith. 266 items;

Material relating to Rose Macaulay's works Bunkum (1924), Life among the English (1942), Miss Anstruther's Letters (1941), and They went to Portugal (1946), such as typescript copies of drafts and corrected proofs, research. 11 items;

Material relating to Rose Macaulay's other works: notebooks, 1940s-1950s, containing observations made on holidays, rough drafts of her final, unfinished, novel, Venice Besieged / Midsummer Moon and other late pieces; press clippings and typescripts of articles and reviews, c 1931-1958, MSS clippings and typescripts of poems, juvenilia, 1905-1955, Christmas cards designed by Rose Macaulay. 106 items, 1950-1958;

Letters from Rose Macaulay to her sister Jean Babington Macaulay. 213 items, 1921/22-1957;

Material concerning Constance Babington Smith's edition of Letters to a Sister, includes research, letters and reviews. 229 items, 1962-1963;

Letters from Rose Macaulay to John Hamilton Cowper Johnson, 199 items, 1950-158;

Material concerning Babington Smith's Letters to a Friend and Last Letters to a Friend, including research and letters of congratulation on publication. 462 items, 1960-1973

Letters and postcards from Rose Macaulay to various recipients, with a few letters to Macaulay. Much of the correspondence is in the form of copies made or obtained during research by Constance Babington Smith, and her correspondence regarding the Gilbert Murray collection at the Bodleian Library is also included here along with copies of Macaulay's letters to Murray; 628 items, 1907-1973.

Macaulay, Dame Emilie Rose (1881–1958), author

Letters to George Peacock

  • PEAC
  • Fondo
  • 1823–58

The papers consist of 281 letters written to George Peacock from a variety of friends, acquaintances, fellow academics and clergymen.

Peacock, George (1791-1858), mathematician and university reformer

Papers of C. D. Broad, Part II

  • BROD II
  • Fondo
  • 20th c.

Papers relating to psychical research and other occult subjects, the Perrott Fellowship, the Arthur Stanley Eddington Memorial Lecture, and the Swedish language, with group photographs relating to Dulwich College.

Broad, Charlie Dunbar (1887-1971), philosopher

Resultados 1 a 30 de 86