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Dakyns, Henry Graham (1838-1911) schoolmaster Sidgwick, Eleanor Mildred (1845-1936) Principal of Newnham College Cambridge
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Letter from H. Graham Dakyns to Nora Sidgwick

Thanks her for her letter. States that he has read the proofs of Henry Sidgwick: A Memoir, which she sent to him, and has made marginal notes throughout. Declares that he likes the way Arthur Sidgwick has done the early chapter[s], and that he does not believe that 'anything in the [ ] of literature of this order' has moved him so much. Refers also to 'the faithful record of a man's last days on earth....' Declares that the book is one of the best biographies ever written. Adds, however, that he misses in the book the presentation of his marriage as a source of his contentedness and 'beatitude'. Predicts that Henry 'will continue to draw his future men into him not only by his published writings of all sorts - but now by his example....' Adds that he has a card for Arthur 'fixing Monday 18th [ ] at Cambridge. Not at Oxford [as he hoped]'. States that he will be there.

Dakyns, Henry Graham (1838-1911) schoolmaster

Letter from H.G. Dakyns to Nora Sidgwick

Hopes that Nora is well. Reports on the weather at Haslemere, and on the nesting of the birds. Refers to two of Henry's comments 'on two "Initial [Society]" notes started by H.W. Eve', which he encloses [not included]. States that Eve sent him the series a few days previously, and that he [Dakyns] thought that Henry's comments were interesting in themselves.

Has not yet had his 'long talked of meeting with Arthur', but expects to be summoned by him to Oxford in the near future. Announces that he is going up to Cambridge for a Memorial [for Henry] meeting the following Tuesday, and puts forward two proposals as to the type of memorial; one being 'a lectureship in Moral Science to be called the Sidgwick Lectureship', and the other ' a studentship in Philosophy... open to men and women to be given every second or third year as the income of the fund may permit'. Expects that the Peiles will know Nora's own feelings on the subject. Adds that Miss [Jane?] Harrison will not be there, as she has set off the previous day for Rome, after which she plans to go on to Athens, and hopes that Dakyns would join her 'in a Cretan expedition' in about a month.

Discusses his wish to travel. Refers to Gilbert Murray, who lives close by Dakyns, 'with his verse translations of the Hippolytus of Euripides and his Greek [ ] readings of Shelley's Helios'. Refers also to Egypt, where he wishes he could take his son Arthur; states that they would then go to Luxor, where they would see Nora, and know that she is well. Sends Maggie and Frances [his wife and daughter]'s love.

Dakyns, Henry Graham (1838-1911) schoolmaster

Letter from H.G. Dakyns to Nora Sidgwick

Refers to her 'nice long letter', which he received two weeks previously, and sends on the thanks of Maggie and Frances [his wife and daughter] for all Nora's good wishes and for the pleasure her letter gave them. Hopes that she is well, and remarks that from her description of her life it seems to him that she is comfortable. Remarks also on the 'solemn and momentous incidents' that have occurred since she wrote to him, including [the deaths of] Creighton, Frederick Myers and the Queen. Adds that they all agree that her brother [Arthur Balfour]'s words 'were the noblest of all' [in relation to the Queen's death.]

Says that he is going to get a new map of Egypt [where Nora is travelling?], so that they 'may sit on that high place and see those sunsets - and the line of the mighty river and the E[ ] plain and the distant mountains.' States that he is also going soon to Oxford when Arthur [Sidgwick] 'has settled down and is ready' for him; wishes that 'something [could] be done to release [Arthur] from some of his work'. Wishes he knew what Henry would have advised him to do. Refers to the explanatory note on the numbers of Henry's letters, which he sends on a separate page [included].

Dakyns, Henry Graham (1838-1911) schoolmaster

Letter from H.G. Dakyns to Nora Sidgwick

Announces that her letter has arrived, and that he has passed it on to [his son] Roche. Thinks that Roche will prefer his father to keep his letters for him, as he has very little space in his 'little farmstead at the foot of Snowdon'. Undertakes to write to Nora to tell her what Roche wishes to do. Announces that '[t]he Book' [Henry Sidgwick: a Memoir] arrived by the early post, and describes it as 'beautiful - both inside and out'; refers to the photographs. Expresses his gratitude to her for it. Reports that Rose Jackson is there [at Haslemere], 'talking to Maggie who is reclining on the sofa....', and sends the latter's love to Nora.

Dakyns, Henry Graham (1838-1911) schoolmaster

Letter from H.G. Dakyns to Nora Sidgwick, with note about Henry Sidgwick's letters

Letter [24/1], saying that he is sending Nora by parcel post today the corrected copies of Henry's letters 'I to LXXVIII', and hopes to get the remainder from Miss Dickens [his typist?] that week or the following week. Explains that he sends a typewritten copy and a carbon duplicate [of each letter], and suggests that Arthur might prefer the latter format. Also explains the corrections that he has made. Adds that he has decided to have almost all of Henrys's Initial [Society] papers typed for his own 'private delectation', and undertakes to send a copy each to Nora and Arthur. States that he looks forward to seeing her 'on the 26th', when he intends coming up 'to the meeting' and to spend the night with the Peiles, but fears that he may be prevented from going to the Society for Psychical Research meeting. Hopes that she is well, and remarks that she must be very tired as the term draws to an end. Refers to 'Henry's watchword - fier', and asks where he got it.

MS explanatory note [24/2] in relation to correspondence between Dakyns and Henry Sidgwick. Refers to letters which he sent to Henry at Terling, and to their arrangement. Notes that Henry rarely dated his earlier letters, but says that he does not despair of getting them 'into a more exact chronological order', having spoken to Arthur and having recovered 'the threads of internal evidence.' Speaks of Henry's 'passing moods' of troubled thought and depression, and believes that he was most conscious of 'a sense of the beauty and richness and joy of life....'

Dakyns, Henry Graham (1838-1911) schoolmaster