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Additional Manuscripts b Sidgwick, Eleanor Mildred (1845-1936) Principal of Newnham College Cambridge
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Notes relating to the life of Henry Sidgwick

Notebooks: 'List of articles & reviews by Dr Sidgwick with remarks by E[leanor] M[ildred] Sidgwick', including several loose sheets and gatherings [item 1]; recording references to Sidgwick in the [Cambridge University] Reporter, 1870-1979 [item 2], Oct 1876-June 1886 [item 3], Nov 1886-1894 [item 4], 1895-1896, [item 5, labelled 1894-1896], 1897-1900 [item 6]; recording references to and contributions by Sidgwick in the Cambridge University Gazette, 1868-1869 [item 7]; 'University & College Reforms', also including two printed sheets (notes by Sidgwick re Council,12 Jun 1870, and re compulsory Greek [May 1872]) and one MS sheet of notes re the Syndicates [item 8]; 'List of Dr Sidgwick's Lectures from University Reporter, 1870-1900' [item 9]. Printed prospectus of Cambridge lectures in moral science, 1887-1888 [item 10].

Henry Sidgwick: notebook containing additions incorporated in the sixth edition of Methods of Ethics

Note on first page by E[leanor] M[ildred] Sidgwick explaining that Methods of Ethics was being revised when Henry Sidgwick died, and that the 'additions etc are in his handwriting and have been bound [she thinks] by Miss E. C[onstance] Jones who helped him with the revision and completed it after his death'.

Sidgwick, Henry (1838–1900), philosopher

Letter from E.E. Bowen to Arthur Sidgwick

Typewritten copy of letter. Refers to a piece he has written on Henry Sidgwick [see ADD.MS/b/71/3/3-5], which refers to the latter's undergraduate years at Cambridge. Gives his permission to use the piece in any way he wishes. Wishes that he could find some letters, but states that he could only find one letter in blank verse, which he sent to Nora Sidgwick. In relation to the writing of the memoir advises Arthur Sidgwick to 'sacrifice everything to shortness....' Accompanied by sheet, with explanatory note in ink: 'Copy of E. E. Bowen[']s notes about Henry'.

Bowen, Edward Ernest (1836-1901) schoolmaster

Letter from Lord [Hallam] Tennyson to Nora Sidgwick

Thanks her for letting him see 'these most interesting proofs' [of Nora and Arthur Sidgwick's memorial of Henry Sidgwick], and states that he quite understands that she will have to shorten the draft. Refers to some 'scraps' written to [Henry Graham] Dakyns, which are 'not worthy of insertion'. In answer to questions she had put to him, claims that he cannot remember the exact date of a letter about 'In Memoriam'; that the reference to Wilfrid Ward is to an article on his [Tennyson's] father; and that the reference to Leslie Stephen is to 'an attack of his on the Idylls of the King'. Suggests 'Tod' might refer to [Alpheus] Todd's Parliamentary Government in the British Colonies. Refers to notes in his father's autobiography - Memoir of Alfred Lord Tennyson - in relation to the interpretation of a letter. Adds that he hopes that Nora's brother - Arthur Balfour - 'will s[ ] Parliament soon - for the feeling of unrest [ ] to Arnold-Forster and Co is becoming rampant.' Sends his wife's kindest remembrances.

Tennyson, Hallam (1852-1928) 2nd Baron Tennyson

Letter from James Bryce to Nora Sidgwick

Explains that he found her letter of 25 September on his return to his home that night. States that there is nothing in the diary entries that she sent him in the proof [of the memoir to Henry Sidgwick] to which he objects. Remarks that what Henry wrote in the diary is very interesting, and expresses the hope that there is a good deal of it that she can publish. States that he will recommence his search for letters from Henry now that he is in London again for a few days. Believes that he could find some a later date, i.e., between 1870 and 1895. Reports that he [and his wife] have had an instructive, but rather tiring tour in Macedonia and Bulgaria, and sends on his wife's love to Nora. Adds that he has found the last letter Henry wrote to him, and sends a copy of it [not included], and remarks on the 'serenity and cheerfulness' in it and 'the interest in things which still remained with him.' Confirms that the ' "New Academy" ' is the British Academy, 'for whose establishment he [Henry] had taken some pains'.

Bryce, James (1838-1922) Viscount Bryce of Dechmont, politician

Letter from M[arianne] Latham to Nora Sidgwick

Tells Nora to do whatever she likes with what she wrote about Nora. Explains that it was originally 'a kind of protest...against some of Mr. Myers' words.' States that the '[ ]field time was certainly first after the vacation at Oban', and recalls C.H. Tawney bringing another man, when Tawney first came home from Oban, and Henry [Sidgwick] coming a little later. Admits that she cannot recall how the tableau vivant question came up, but states that 'the Afghan costume wasnt [sic] the only time Mr. Sidgwick dressed himself up', and recalls having seen him walking about in the garden of a house they lived in in Glamorganshire in an enormous sun hat. Adds that she has not [touched] the [proofs?] because she agrees to whatever Nora thinks.

Latham, Marianne Frances (1839-1926) née Bernard, mistress of Girton

Letter from [Frank] Podmore to Nora Sidgwick

Referring to an enclosed printed extract regarding an estimation of Henry Sidgwick's character, declares that he shall be very glad that the 'few lines should be quoted', and states that he has made some slight alterations in order to bring out the meaning more clearly. States that he shall look forward greatly to reading the book [Henry Sidgwick, a memoir]. Adds that he was reading a few days ago Masterman's appreciation of Henry Sidgwick in The Peril of Change.

Podmore, Frank (1856-1910) psychical researcher

Letter from William Everett to Nora Sidgwick

Apologises for the delay in replying to her letter. Tells her that she is welcome to print the 'little bit' of his if she wishes. Reports that soon after he knew that Nora's book was making good progress he asked the editor of the Atlantic Monthly - a literary magazine - to let him write an article on it, or on Henry Sidgwick himself, as soon as the book comes out. Asks if it would be possible for her to send him 'advance sheets' for this purpose. Declares that he looks back with great interest to Cambridge and Newnham, and adds that it was very kind of Nora to receive him there.

Everett, William (1839-1910) classicist

Letter from Arthur Sidgwick to Nora Sidgwick.

Announces that the poem has been found, and he sends it with two other pieces [not included] 'about which [they] hesitated when [they] were looking thro' the papers'. States that he thinks that 'the prose fragment 'about "friends" is the most interesting: the Oma[r] [Khayam] verses next: and the Iphig[enia] least.' Remarks that one difficulty is that there is no special place in the book [Henry Sidgwick, a memoir to put the above, and suggests that they have 'a small print addendum, containing those three, avowedly as fragments....' Encloses a note for [ ] S. [not included].

Sidgwick, Arthur (1840–1920), educationist and classical scholar

Letter from Alice Johnson to Nora Sidgwick

Discusses the proofs of chapters two, three and four of Henry Sidgwick: A Memoir, which she is reading a second time. States that she feels very strongly against cutting this part of the book down at all, as she believes that there is 'practically nothing...that one would not be very sorry to miss from it.' Refers to its 'interest and charm', and to Henry's sincerity and courage, as well as to 'his refusal to be satisfied either with a materialistic or merely abstract theory.' Estimates that the complete book would constitute 'two not very big volumes', and compares this to the size of other biographies, e.g., Tennyson's, J.A. Symond's, V[ ]'s letters, and Colvin's Letters of R[obert] L[ouis] S[tevenson]. Declares that the great variety of topics in the book will make it more interesting to more people. Adds that in reading the proofs she has marked things she thought to be misprints, and refers to some inconsistencies and inaccuracies. States that she is very anxious for a reference to Henry's letter 'about In Memoriam in Tennyson's Life' to be brought in somewhere in the work, and also that the account he wrote in Archbishop Benson's Life about his school days will also be included. Refers to Henry's interest in others, and in particular to a letter he wrote to her after her Tripos. Undertakes to try to send off the proofs of the second chapter the following morning.

Johnson, Alice (1860-1940) zoologist, psychical researcher

Letter from Arthur C. Benson to Nora Sidgwick

Sends her back the proofs of Henry Sidgwick: A Memoir [not included], which, he claims, interested him greatly. States that he has 'scribbled a few scattered criticisms and corrections at the side', but assures her that they are very few. Remarks that he likes 'the semi-autobiographical plan' very much, but declares that the letters 'don't give a rich enough picture of his mind.' Adds that he thought that at some points the explanatory matter was a little too technical, especially in relation to the higher education of women. States that he appended to the last sheets 'a [tiny] scrap of reminiscence' of his own about Henry's talk, because he believes that the people she had quoted 'turned too much to the purely mental stuff of the thoughts, and did not bring out the manner, the personality, which lent so great a charm.' Tells her to use his piece in any way she pleases. Announces that he is not going to Windsor after all. Suggests that she might like to discuss some of the points he touched upon, and informs her that he would be available after the following Monday.

Benson, Arthur Christopher (1862–1925) poet and college head

Letter from Mary C Malvin to Nora Sidgwick

Hopes that the letter will arrive in time to greet Nora on her return. Thanks her for writing to her to tell her how she was and what she was doing. States that she has just been looking out Ewhurst on a map, and observes that it is close to Leith Hill, which they have been told they should climb when they are at Tadworth, as the view from it is so good. Adds that they are not going there until the end of July, but that her mother and she are going away to Marlborough for a shorter visit on the following Thursday. Reports on her own health, and that she has of late been suffering from fatigue. Claims that the plot of her tale 'has come clearer...', but that she has not worked very hard on it. Reports also that E[alie] Slinger has been ill for some time, but that she gets up on her couch for a few hours daily, and has taken to writing letters with her left hand. States that she has at last found out about Dr Dale's school. Explains that her brother at Rochester knows a Miss Dale there whose father had the school [in Blackheath] some years previously. Believes that it was a private school for boys, but adds that she is 'judging solely from its character under a later master - a Mr Valentine who succeeded Dr Dale....' Offers to find out more details for Nora. Adds that Miss Hodgetts was married on 26 June 'to a Mr Sweeny'. Accompanied by an envelope addressed to Nora at Newnham Collgege, with MS note: 're Dr Dale's school'.

Letter from F.W. Maitland to Nora Sidgwick

Hesitates to intrude upon her sorrow, but assures her that no day has passed without his thinking of Henry Sidgwick, whom he loved and honoured. Explains that he learned from Frederick Pollock that she was collecting Henry's letters. Refers to the only one he has [not included], which was written to him the previous winter.

Maitland, Frederic William (1850-1906) legal historian

Letter from Charlotte F. Patterson to Nora Sidgwick

Explains that she heard from [James] Bryce that Nora would like to have part of Henry Sidgwick's correspondence with her father [Arthur John Patterson]. Reports that she has spoken to her mother, who will be happy for Nora to have the letter as soon as they get back to town, which will be in the early part of September.

Patterson, Charlotte Frances (b 1872) daughter of Arthur John Patterson

Letter from Arthur Sidgwick to Nora Sidgwick.

Reports that he was down at Haslemere the previous Saturday to Monday, and that he [and H.G. Dakyns] worked on the rest of Dakyns letters. Refers to the need for discretion, which Nora had mentioned, and states that he regards all the letters as confidential. Relates that Dakyns was 'infinitely good over the letters', and claims that between them they have dated nearly all of them. Believes that they will be helpful 'at every point except what concerns [Henry Sidgwick's] administrative Cambridge work', and states that they show 'himself on many sides', and that his 'infinite unwearied thoughtfulness, and quiet wisdom, and great range of interest, and kindness, are apparent everywhere.'

Sidgwick, Arthur (1840–1920), educationist and classical scholar

Letter from E.E. Bowen to Nora Sidgwick

Sends her the only letter [from Henry Sidgwick] that he can find [not included]. Remarks that the freedom and freshness of it still seems very vivid to him. Advises her in relation to her plan to write a memoir, that it would be best 'in the form either of an introduction to some posthumous publication, or else of a magazine or review article.'

Bowen, Edward Ernest (1836-1901) schoolmaster

Letter from J.W. Cross to Nora Sidgwick

Sends Nora three letters [from Henry Sidgwick; not included]. Remarks that their quality 'is very characteristic in the generosity of appreciation of another's work.' Discusses the dating of the correspondence and explains how he had estimated the dates. Refers to Middlemarch, to which Henry had referred in one of the letters, and to the latter's favourable reaction to it. In relation to the third letter of 29 April 1880, states that he sends it for Nora's own reading only, as he does not want it to be published.

Cross, John Walter (1840-1924) banker

Letter from Constance Jones to Nora Sidgwick with enclosures

Thanks her for her letter. Refers to the enclosed letter and copy of minute and tells her to keep them. Reminds her that [Henry Sidgwick's] article on 'The Philosophy of Common Sense' was published in Mind in 1895. Announces that she is having a children's party on the following Monday, but claims that 'it will seem very different from the times when [Nora has] been so kind as to come'.

Jones, Emily Elizabeth Constance (1848-1922) philosopher and Mistress of Girton

Letter from Mary Ellen Martineau to Nora Sidgwick

Regrets to inform her that she is unable to find any of Henry Sidgwick's letters among her father [James Martineau]'s letters. States that if they were by any chance sent to Dr Drummond in connection with his and Professor Upton's memoir of her father, he will return them without delay.

Martineau, Mary Ellen (1833-1902) children's author

Letter from Basil Champneys to Nora Sidgwick

Sends her a copy of a letter to him from Henry Sidgwick [not included], which he suggests might be of some use to her. Remarks that the latter part of it is an example of 'the accuracy and tact of [Henry's] judgment in matters of general culture'. Expresses his pleasure at the news that Nora and Arthur Sidgwick are to write a memoir of Henry. Refers to a paper by Frank Cornish in the Pilot of 22 December, which he describes as 'admirable', and offers to send it to her if she has not yet come across it. Adds that he has put, 'by way of a note, the passages in [Robert Bridges'] "[Pros]ody of [Milton]" referred to in [Henry's] letter at the end....' Expresses the hope that 'the change and holiday' will do Nora great good, and reassures her of their sincere and deep sympathy. Offers to send her the original letter if she wishes to have it.

Champneys, Basil (1842-1935) architect and author

Letter from Horatio F. Brown to Nora Sidgwick

Announces that he is sending a packet of Henry Sidgwick's letters to her [not included] - two to [John Addington] Symonds, and the rest to his [Brown's] mother and to himself. Claims to have a good many more letters and memoranda 'full of that exquisite finesse of humour that was so peculiarly his', but that as they all relate to the ' "Life" of Mr Symonds' he doubts that they would be of use to Nora. Offers to send them to her if she wishes to have them. Hopes that she has found 'the Journal Letters.' Sends his mother's best wishes. List [in Nora's hand] of '[l]etters enclosed and copied', and their dates: to 'J.A.S', 'H.F.B', 'Mrs Brown and to 'H.F.D.',

Brown, Horatio Robert Forbes (1854-1926) historian

Letter from James Bryce to Nora Sidgwick

Thanks her for the letters, which he claims remind him of 'some of the steps connected with the establishment of the British Academy' that he had forgotten. Confirms that the statement Nora sent to him is quite correct, and states that he has added a few words, 'which explain the thing a little more fully to those who may not know the facts.' Believes that it is very possible that he has some of Henry Sidgwick's letters about the [British] Academy, but had not found them before leaving London. States that Henry and Lord Acton were the two who had most faith in the idea, but that his [Bryce']s correspondence was chiefly with Henry. Adds that the other letters reached him safely, and thanks her for them. States that he [and his wife] will be in Sussex until about 25 August, and then they plan to go abroad for five or six weeks. Asks her to let them know if she should be at T[remans]. Adds that they hope to be back [in Sussex] in October.

Letter from G.O. Trevelyan to Nora Sidgwick

Thanks her for her letter, and declares that he is deeply gratified by the insertion of the letter of 29 May, especially beause he believes it is 'unique in the highest sense.' States that they look forward to Nora's visit. Sends back to her the chapter [of Henry Sidgwick, a Memoir, not included], which, he claims, surpasses his expectations, and is 'a wonderful picture of [Henry's] thought and action.' Hopes that she will not finally insert the three lines of Bullock Hall's until he sees her, and states that his reasons for this wish are literary. Declares that he is very well satisfied by the references to himself. Refers to a passage 'about "the game of law and order being up" ', which, he claims, was used against him 'in ten thousand leaflets, without the context, and most unfairly.' Adds that Henry's own remark about it is quite proper and reasonable. Tells Nora to think over the references to Dilke and to Jebb's garden. Is sure she will 'keep in about the "Sidgwick Road." ' Adds that it is impossible to alter, or criticise in detail, the general construction of an admirable book, and states that this book - unlike any recent biographies 'presents the real person...one's own old friend'.

Trevelyan, Sir George Otto (1838-1928) 2nd Baronet, statesman and historian

Letter from James Ward to Nora Sidgwick

Hopes that Nora will not be angry with him for returning the cheque which she sent to him [not included]. States that he believed he owed it to Henry Sidgwick to do what he asked him to do, and declares that he was pleased that he did ask him. Adds that he has never grudged the time it has taken, 'nor thought of any pecuniary return, small or great.' Claims that he sent 'the copy' to Professor [ ] some time previously, but states that he has not acknowledged it. Thanks her for the new [essay] for the N[ational] S[ ] Library.

Ward, James (1843-1925) philosopher and psychologist

Letter from Henry Jackson to Nora Sidgwick

Asks if Miss Edg[ ] could call at his rooms on the following Saturday. Reports that the papers have reached him, and remarks that he supposes that the volume of which she speaks is a collection of tracts. States that, until Nora showed him the letters, he had not realised that the motions, brought forward at the College meetings of 1865 to 1869, were in the main devised by Henry alone. States that he has assumed that Henry had been acting in conjunction with others, such as Edward Bowen and George Young. Remarks that his 'vigorous initiative' was instumental in preparing them for the legislative work of 1870 to 1873. Expresses his concern at the news that she had been unwell. Adds that he expects to be in Cambridge until the end of the month, and that he will be glad to call if she would like him to do so.

Letter from Arthur Sidgwick to Nora Sidgwick.

Explains that he has been occupied with various affairs since her letter arrived, including 'presenting D.Litt. candidate for Degree, and organising lunch party in Corpus for [his] indefatigable brother in law Archdeacon [Edward] Wilson....' Announces that he goes the following day to Haslemere to work with 'HGD' [Henry Graham Dakyns] 'at the remaining letters of his series which [they] had not time to finish' when he was in Oxford. Asks Nora for any other letters that she is able to send him, since he now has time to spend more time working on them. Informs her, confidentially, that his retirement [as Tutor at Corpus Christi, Oxford) is now fixed for Easter 1902. States that he shall keep his Readership, and also his 'A.E.W. work' [Association for the Education of Women in Oxford]. In relation to Frank [Sidgwick], declares that he is 'no scholar', and that he [Arthur] has 'never had any illusions about his Tripos.' Announces that he is writing to Mrs [Eveleen?] Myers. States that he kept the books because since he returned his proofs to the editor of the Dictionary of National Biography he has heard nothing, and thought it possible that 'he might require a revise, which might mean reference to the books again.'

Sidgwick, Arthur (1840–1920), educationist and classical scholar

Letter from James Drummond to Nora Sidgwick

Gives a list of dates connected with the Free Christian Union, including the date of the meeting to propose its foundation and appoint a Committee in University Hall, and the dates of the meetings to constitute the Union and to settle the final form of constitution, and of the first and second annual meetings. Adds that there was 'a good deal of private conference, and some public controversy, before the earliest of these dates [14 June 1867], in order to clear the ground for the Union'; and that the facts are 'pretty fully related' in his [Drummond's] biography of James Martineau.

Drummond, James (1835-1918) Unitarian minister

Letter from J. Sully to Nora Sidgwick

Thanks her for her letter. Regrets that he could only find 'a few short letters' [from Henry Sidgwick], and sends 'six and a testimonial' [not included]. Does not think that they will be of any use for the memoir, which he is pleased to hear is being written. Refers to Henry's kindness to him, and claims to 'prize among [his] treasures' Henry's testimonial to him. States how great a privilege it is for him to be associated with him in the work of the International Congress of Psychology in 1892. Refers to his 'almost womanly consideration', and his 'delightful humour', which appear in his letters. Mentions a letter he received from Henry in reply to one from himself asking him to sign a protest 'against carrying the war in S. Africa to the point of conquest and annexation', and offers to send it to her. States that he was sorry to hear of Nora's poor health, but hopes that the change and the fine air 'have re-established it'. Adds that he and Henry 'used to talk much of [insomnia]', which he believes probably bound them together 'almost as much as common philosophic [talks]'. Explains that the enclosed letter of 1879 has to do with a plan of theirs 'to start a sort of hostel'. Claims that he was in 'a hopeless condition of brain-weariness', and that they had to think of some new way of m[ ]ing themselves. Notes [in Nora's hand] states that the letter Sully refers to from HS and referring to the petition against the war in South Africa was sent and is copied, and that the last letter referred to was not copied.

Sully, James (1842-1928) philosopher and psychologist

Letter from Arthur C. Benson to his aunt Nora Sidgwick

States that since he will probably be away all Wednesday, he had better not promise to come [to see her]. Expresses the desire to see his uncle Arthur [Sidgwick] and Mr [Henry Graham] Dakyns. Referring to Henry Sidgwick's gestures, states that some were connected with his stammer, but that there were others, which added emphasis and conclusiveness. Describes one particular gesture, which involved 'a swing of the hand with the forefinger extended and the other fingers closed....'

Benson, Arthur Christopher (1862–1925) poet and college head

Letter from G.O. Trevelyan to Nora Sidgwick

Declares that he very much looks forward to the privilege of reading more [of the proofs of Henry Sidgwick: A Memoir], but states that he does not feel competent to advise about omissions and insertions. Declares that he is exceedingly pleased by all the allusions to himself, which, he claims, truly represent his relationship with Henry. Declares that he thinks Henry 'the Representative man of [their] generation....' Expresses the wish to see his own letters.

Trevelyan, Sir George Otto (1838-1928) 2nd Baronet, statesman and historian

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