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Printed articles by A. M. Binnie

94 articles on hydrodynamics, most of them offprints, accompanied by a typescript list which has been attached to this catalogue record. Four articles are from the pre-publication stage, but the only one bearing annotations is a corrected copy of an article (item 3, "The flow under gravity of an incompressible and inviscid fluid through a constriction in a horizontal channel" in the Proceedings of the Royal Society, 1937). Another article, an Advance copy, has a photograph of a device for a pipe line laid in loose: item 22, "Protective Air Vessels for Rising Pipe Lines" for The Institution of Mechanical Engineers. One proof is a Confidential report for the Aeronautical Research Committee in 1929 (item 2, "The Influence of Oxygen on Corrosion Fatigue"). Two of the items are represented by the original journal in which they appeared (item 11, Journal of the Institution of Civil Engineers No. 3, 1940-41; and item 17, The Structural Engineer Vol. XX, Number 7, July 1942). One offprint listed on the accompanying typescript list is an article by Binnie, but the item itself is an article from later in the same journal, T. Brooke Benjamin's "Wave formation in laminar flow down an inclined plane" rather than Binnie's "Experiments on the onset of wave formation on a film of water flowing down a vertical plane" in the Journal of Fluid Mechanics, Vol. 2, Part 6, Aug.1957.

Binnie, Alfred Maurice (1901-1986), physicist

Arthur Munby: poems about and postcards to Hannah Cullwick

Twenty-two poems in Arthur Munby's hand, written to and about his wife Hannah Cullwick, with 4 postcards sent to her by Munby, and two newscuttings about their relationship.

There are twenty complete poems and two fragments in Munby's hand, fair copies evidently meant for presentation to Hannah, with a few carrying his emendations. Sixteen of the poems are dated, from 19 August 1882 (Munby's 54th birthday) to Christmas 1900. Poems include "To my Hannah, Christmas 1884"; "A servant-wife", Feb. 1886; "Weerin o Glooves", one of two complete dialect poems, this dated 18 Feb. 1887; "Bonne à toute faire", a poem of 60 stanzas dated 29 Jan. 1888; "Ann Lee", another dialect poem dated 16 Feb. 1888; "De haut en bas", a poem of 51 stanzas dated 27 Feb. 1888; "In our Cottage", a sonnet dated 16 Dec. 1895; "To my Hannah for her 65th Birthday"; "For Hannah, New Year 1901" with a pencilled note that the poem refers to her as Hannah Lee 'cause Cullwick winna rime'; an untitled poem of 160 lines written in ink and in pencil, with each of the 40 stanzas ending 'My Hannah'; an untitled poem in 14 stanzas with 3 stanzas written at the end under the heading 'Left out'; and an untitled sonnet beginning 'Others may scorn thy rough laborious life'.

The four postcards are written in French in Arthur Munby's hand, to "Chérie" and signed "M", and are dated 1886-1890. The first two postcards are addressed to Hannah Munby at Charles Gibbs's in Brearly and G. Gibbs in Wolverhampton, and two from Feb. and Nov. 1890 are to Hannah at Hadley. Munby asks for news, is pleased she likes his gifts, urges her to take care of her health, rejects her protest that she has nothing to write about and asks her to describe her work, and reflects on the difference between a lady and a servant, writing 'mais moi, c'est toujours ma servante que j'aime, et qui est ma femme aussi'.

Accompanied by two newscuttings, one from News of the World, [1910] headed "Poet's Romance. Wife Who Would Not Be a Lady. Rich Man's Visits to Humble Cottage", and another from the Cambridge Daily News 14 Jan. 1950 headed "Trinity's 40-Years-Old Mystery Box" about opening the Munby papers after 40 years.

Munby, Arthur Joseph (1828–1910), diarist and civil servant

Diary and account book belonging to Thomas Hebbes

Diary entries and accounts kept by a student in his last year at Trinity College, Cambridge in a printed diary for 1753 altered to the later date the diary started in February 1755 and continuing on through the beginning of February 1756 when Hebbes left Trinity for Kensington. Hebbes records academic activities: declaiming in Chapel, presenting an epistle to the Master of Trinity Dr Smith, and paying the Moderator's man for huddling before being examined by Mr Howkins, and then by two moderators, and four fathers in the 'theatre'. His accounts record purchases of food, a subscription to Dockrell's Coffee House, and a variety of miscellaneous items: a new wig, repairs to his watch, Christmas boxes, as well as expenses relating to trips to London, Saffron Walden, Royston, Chesterton, and Stourbridge Fair. He records money won and lost at cards and bowls, and money given to the poor. He mentions selling books, makes payments to the Junior Proctor, Beadle, Head Lecturer and Senior Bursar, and buys a bachelor's gown, and wine and port for the 'Batchelor's table' before taking his degree. The diary also appears to have been used for handwriting practice by Ellen Hebbes and possibly other Hebbes children.

Hebbes, Thomas (c 1733-1766), clergyman

Letter from Isaac Barrow to the Fellows of Trinity College, Cambridge

Pera, Constant[ino]politanae - After an apology for the long delay in writing to the Fellowship, he gives an account of his travels from Paris, with a description of his stay in Florence, prolonged because of the plague in Naples, which was predicted to spread to Rome whither he had planned to go next; heeding the warning that if caught by the plague he would not be able to leave, and it proving too difficult to reach Venice, he embarks on a ship to Constantinople. He describes the present state of affairs under the Grand Vizier, Koprulu Mehmed Pasha, who had come to power two years earlier: his work to restore the Ottoman name at home and abroad, recovering the islands of Tenedos and Lemnos, repelling an attack by the Venetian fleet, suppressing a revolt in Moldavia and Wallachia by removing their princes, repressing the infighting threatening the prestige of the empire, most recently undertaking an expedition to Transylvania on the pretext that Prince Ragotzy, a Turkish subject, had invaded Poland hoping to take the kingdom for himself. Barrow predicts that Christendom will find in the Grand Vizier its worst enemy and describes his punishment of Parthenius, the Patriarch of the Greek Church, who was accused of intrigue with the Duke of Muscovy despite the commonly held view that the accusations were false, and who was hanged and left on display in his Pontifical robes as a deterrent to plotters. Barrow closes with a promise to return to Cambridge within the year.

Docketed by William Derham, "Paper. 1. Dr Barrows Lr ...to the Fellows of Trin. Col. Cambridge from Constantinople. Caland August 1658. Publ. Lr 1. W.Ds.'

Barrow, Isaac (1630–1677), mathematician and theologian

Letter from Robert Erskine Childers to Ivor Lloyd-Jones, with provenance letter

A farewell letter written immediately before his death: 'Dearest Ivor, It doesn't matter what you think of me. I know you love me -- the first friendship in my life & indestructable. So in lieu of goodbye & from my heart & soul God bless you & Gwladys & her daughter & give you great happiness. Erskine'.

Accompanied by a letter from Ivor Lloyd-Jones to Norman de Bruyne dated 27 June 1935 donating this letter and [his copy of 'The Riddle of the Sands'] to Trinity College Library, Cambridge.

Childers, Robert Erskine (1870–1922), author and politician

Letter from George Airy

Royal Observatory Greenwich - Further to WW's memorial on tides, the Secretary of the Admiralty requires more details before they approve the plan. Thus could WW make out a more precise explanation. It would be prudent to consult a naval man like Francis Beaufort - 'who knows ports, winds, and currents' [see GA to WW, 31 Dec. 1851].

Letter from George Airy

Flamsteed House Greenwich - GA encloses the Tide Memorial for WW's signature: 'I should think that it would be best addressed to the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, and sent with a letter to the Secretary of the Admiralty'.

Letter from George Airy

Royal Observatory Greenwich - Further to his last letter and the approval of WW's memorial on tides, GA subsequently sent a paper copy to Lord Rosse at the Royal Society for his approval; 'but I have heard nothing more about it (A non-resident President is a great evil). However, it will come I should think before long'.

Letter from George Airy

Royal Observatory Greenwich - WW's memorial on the tides 'was duly read by me and approved to the best of my judgement, and reserved for the intended meeting of the B.A. Council'. A Council was called without informing GA: 'Imagine a Seniority Meeting without notice to the Master - so I have pronounced said meeting null and void, and we will have another soon, as soon as I have screwed Henslow and Hooker into shape, who are the most unpractical dogs that I ever met with. The business of the Association will, in fact, be somewhat advanced by this apparent contretemps'. GA has had a letter from 'Madeira yesterday. My party seem to be posited comfortably; but with regard to the ultimate success in the main object of the voyage, I have little hope' [see GA to WW, 20 Nov. 1851].

Letter from George Airy

Flamsteed House, Greenwich - GA has received a letter from his wife: 'With one day's roughness the voyage had been very smooth. They had scarcely any sickness, but Mrs Airy had suffered constant nausea; and they seem weary of the voyage' [see GA to WW, 20 November 1851].

Letter from George Airy

Playford near Ipswich - Edward Sabine has told GA that there should be a meeting of the BAAS in mid-January: 'The connexion of this with your Tidal proposal is not extremely close, but it suggests to me to ask you how far you have got the whole affair into shape. I do not think it right towards the Government or politic towards ourselves to make application till we know pretty exactly what is to be done, and can thus put them in a state to judge well of the magnitude, duration, and expense of the expedition'. GA agrees that the character of the expedition should be exclusively tidal.

Letter from George Airy

Flamsteed House, Greenwich - Due to a little ailment and the desire to go to Playford with his family, GA must 'reluctantly give up the chance of seeing' WW.

Letter from George Airy

Flamsteed House, Greenwich - The ship Richarda Airy is to sail on 'probably will not sail outward from Southampton before December 5' [see GA to WW, 20 November 1851]. This will probably prevent GA coming to Cambridge next week.

Letter from George Airy

Royal Observatory Greenwich - 'Richarda Airy has determined on taking our daughter [Elizabeth Airy who is ill] to Madeira. This, I need not say, is a grave measure; the mere expense is to me not a slight thing; but the most serious part is the separation for so long a time of the head of such a family'. GA proposes to come to Cambridge at some time and among other things talk to WW about the Sydney Professorships: 'These good people in Australia suddenly sent a commission to Herschel, Malden, H. Denisen, and myself, to ship them off 3 professors'.

Letter from George Airy

Royal Observatory Greenwich - GA returned from Gottenberg almost three days ago '& have my eclipse very well...and very wonderful it was: - doubtless the reds belong to the sun's atmosphere (not to the moon, nor to the sun's body)'. He has not yet drawn up his account of the eclipse due to work: 'Main is gone out for holiday and I am master and man. I am as it were up to the elbows in refractions...no bad thing, occasionally, to be fairly forced to go through the details of the books: for I always find a multitude of little things which though perfectly venial are almost intolerable'. He will present his account of the eclipse at the November meeting of the Astronomical Society.

Letter from George Airy

Observatory - GA gives WW references to French works on polarisation written between 1808 and 1824: 'Most of Biot's papers are tremendous to a person who is not very familiar with the subject, & perfectly easy to one who is familiar with it and has thought upon it well'.

Letter from George Airy

Royal Observatory Greenwich - The tide observations Mr Maclear [Thomas Maclear] refers to are 'assuredly observations made at the Cape of Good Hope. Whether they have yet been sent to England, I do not know'. They will be sent to Francis Beaufort and not GA.

Letter from George Airy

Royal Observatory Greenwich - GA corrects a common misinterpretation of a Greek word (the sense of which is 'reverence' and not 'modesty') - 'a favourite language with me'.

Letter from George Airy

Royal Observatory Greenwich - GA's suggestion for a Greek word appropriate to describe 'constructions or usages like those of a murial circle'.

Letter from George Airy

Royal Observatory Greenwich - WW coined the word Altazimuth for the Altitude and Azimuth Instrument, on consideration has he any change to make in it? Can he think of a name which is logical and convenient for another instrument commonly called a Collimater: 'Now the instrument so used is not described as to its characteristic property by this word, it may be used, it is true, for errors of collimation, but its distinguishing property is embedded in the words "inverse-action telescope". Could you invent a word of knowing aspect yet not excessively strange which would express this?'

Letter from George Airy

Flamsteed House, Greenwich - George Airy's brother has come across a copy of the Solemn League and covenant signed by most of the people in his parish [Swineshead]: 'I think there are not many of these parochial covenants in existence - so it appeared to me well to ask his licence to offer it to the library'.

Letter from George Airy

Royal Observatory Greenwich - GA is 'in the agony of mounting the great transit circle... I fully expect that it will do well'.

Letter from George Airy

Bonar Bridge - Thomas Clarkson, the son of GA's late friend the abolitionist Clarkson, is coming up to Trinity in October: 'This youth I dare say has no brilliant talent... Slightly uncouth in manner. - Now I am anxious that he should be in the society of gentlemanly men (I do not mean expensive men, for his fortune is not large)... Would it suit your views and your convenience that I should give him a simple note of introduction to you?... I really feel as much interest in the fortune of this youth as if he was my own relation'."

Letter from George Airy

Inverness - Regarding WW's question concerning fringes, 'I really can say nothing about them without seeing them. The dust-fringes and vapour-fringes have always mystified me a little. The others I have no doubt will come out as easily as becomes matters which usually have some very unmanageable geometry with very easy physics. But to tell the truth I do not know precisely how either set is formed'. Otto Struve is on his way to Lassell [William Lassell] at Liverpool and Lord Rosse at Parsonstown to see telescopes.

Letter from George Airy

Royal Observatory Greenwich - Ransome and May acknowledge receipt of WW's letter advising payment for the paper punch [see GA to WW, 10 April 1850]. 'I understand that Lord John's announcement of the University Inquiry Commission took all parties by surprise. I do not know any thing more about it; but I conceive that it is a thing about which nobody in Cambridge needs to be alarmed or annoyed. I am convinced that Cambridge generally will come out of it; and specially that Trin: Col: would be a gainer...as far as I can gather, it is principally Oxford against which the commission is directed'.

Letter from George Airy

Observatory - GA returns a parcel of amethystine crystals of which, due to their rough surfaces, he has been able to make nothing. 'I have lately determined an odd thing in the way of polarization, viz that the light of ladies eyes is polarized - at least when viewed in particular directions. When deprived of this light, the eye has a most unnatural appearance'.

Letter from George Airy

Royal Observatory Greenwich - GA encloses the bill for the paper puncher WW ordered (made by Ransome and May). GA's life has been very busy over the last two or three months. His 'great instrument has not yet left the engineers. The pivots have given some trouble'.

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