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Crewe Manuscripts
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Crewe Manuscripts

  • Crewe MS
  • Colección
  • 16th–20th centuries

The collection includes manuscripts in various European languages, dating from the sixteenth century to the twentieth. Most of them are, broadly speaking, of a literary, historical, or religious nature, but it is not easy to summarise the range of subjects they cover. They include, for instance, from the seventeenth century, notarial instruments in French relating to Charlotte de Beaune, an English translation of Den Spegel der Gherechticheit by Hendrik Niclaes of the so-called ‘Family of Love’, and a collection of English court poetry; from the eighteenth, papers on British trade, literary copyright, notorious criminals, and the French revolution; and from the nineteenth, a collection of papers and prints relating to the history of ballooning, items collected by Richard Burton on his travels, and a series of volumes recording the transactions of the Philobiblon Society.

Milnes, Richard Monckton (1809–1885), 1st Baron Houghton, author and politician

Application from Richard Mynsterley for an allowance for riding, authorised by the Marquess of Winchester

Richard Mynsterley, one of the messengers of the Queen’s Chamber, asks for an allowance of £3 4s. for riding at the command of the Lord High Treasurer [the Marquess] from the Treasurer’s place at London to Yorkshire to deliver a letter to the ‘costomere’ ther, and for returning ‘with lyche [like] spede’ to London. Mynsterley asks for an allowance for his charges and pains to be rated by the Treasurer at 2s. 8d. a day and paid by one of the tellers of the Receipt. ‘I was xxiiij dayes in thys Jorney.’

(Marked ‘fiat Alloc[atum]’, and signed by the Marquess of Winchester.)

Application from Richard Mynsterley for an allowance for riding, authorised by the Marquess of Winchester

Richard Mynsterley, one of the messengers of the Queen’s Chamber, asks for an allowance of £5 16d. for riding at the command of the Lord High Treasurer [the Marquess] from the Treasurer’s place at London to Cheshire and Lancashire, as far as Hornby Castle, to deliver letters to the collectors in those shires. Mynsterley asks for an allowance for his charges and pains to be rated by the Treasurer at 2s. 8d. a day and paid by one of the tellers of the Receipt. ‘I was out xxxviij dayes in thys same Jorney.’

(Marked ‘fiat Alloc[atum]’, and signed by the Marquess of Winchester.)

Application from Richard Mynsterley for an allowance for riding, authorised by the Marquess of Winchester

Richard Mynsterley, one of the messengers of the Queen’s Chamber, asks for an allowance of £5 16d. for riding at the command of the Lord High Treasurer [the Marquess] from the Treasurer’s place at London to Bedford and Buckingham to deliver ten letters to the lords and collectors there, and from thence to Warwickshire to deliver seven letters to the lords and collectors there, and from thence to Nottingham and Derby to deliver four letters to the lords and collectors there, and from thence to Staffordshire to deliver four letters to the lords and collectors there and a packet to the sheriff of that place, and from thence to Shropshire to deliver three letters to the collector there. Mynsterley asks for an allowance for his charges and pains to be rated by the Treasurer at 2s. 8d. a day and paid by one of the tellers of the Receipt at Westminster. ‘I was xxxviij dayes out in thys Jorney.’

(Marked ‘fiat All[ocatum]’, and signed by the Marquess of Winchester.)

Application from Robert Kitcheman for an allowance for riding, authorised by the Marquess of Winchester

Robert Kitcheman, one of the ordinary messengers of the Queen’s Chamber, asks for an allowance of 26s. 8d. for riding at the command of the Lord High Treasurer [the Marquess] from the Treasurer’s place at London to ‘Pesnell’ [Peasenhall] in Suffolk to deliver a writ to Sir Owen Hopton, sheriff of Suffolk and Norfolk, and for returning to London ‘with like hast’. Kitcheman asks for an allowance for his charges and pains to be rated by the Treasurer at 2s. 8d. a day and paid by one of the tellers of the Receipt at Westminster. ‘I was out in this Jorney the space of x Dayes.’

(Marked ‘fiat All[ocatum]’, and signed by the Marquess of Winchester.)

Application from Richard Mynsterley for an allowance for riding, authorised by the Marquess of Winchester

Richard Mynsterley, one of the messengers of the Queen’s Chamber, asks for an allowance of 26s. 8d. for riding at the command of the Lord High Treasurer [the Marquess] from the Treasurer’s place at London to deliver letters to Mr Dawbeny [probably Christopher Daubeney] at ‘Shyryngton’ [Sharrington], 20 miles beyond Norfolk, [and for returning to London?—the text is unclear]. Mynsterley asks for an allowance for his charges and pains to be rated by the Treasurer at 2s. 8d. a day and paid by one of the tellers of the Receipt. ‘I was owt In thys Jorney x days.’

(Marked ‘fiat Alloc[atum]’, and signed by the Marquess of Winchester.)

Account of money payable to Gilbert Gerard and Richard Onslow, authorised by the Marquess of Winchester and Walter Mildmay, and directed to Humphrey Shelton and the tellers of the Receipt

£66 13s. 4d. is to be allowed to Gilbert Gerard, attorney general, and to Richard Onslow, solicitor general, for their work in ‘drawinge of bookes’ and attendance in connection with the suit between between the Queen and the Earl of Northumberland concerning copper, gold, and silver mines [the ‘Case of Mines’], in which judgement was given for the Queen, and also for their work in another matter relating to the College of Llandinbrevie(?) [this is the apparent reading], in which judgement was also given for the Queen.

(Headed ‘At the liberate Termino Trinitatis anno Decimo Regine Elizabeth’’. In the hand of an amanuensis. Signed by Winchester and Mildmay.)

Letter from the Marquess of Winchester and Walter Mildmay to [an officer of the Receipt of the Exchequer?]

John Gill had a lease from Queen dated 4 Mar. 1563, by which he was granted, among other things, a tenement late in the occupation of John Bingley in Over Trelabe, Cornwall, part of the manor of Carmedon Prior, and another tenement late in the occupation of John Shere in Nethertrelabe, part of the manor of Clemeslande [Climsland] Prior, Cornwall. The yearly rent of the two tenements is 56s. 2d. and the fine is equivalent to four years’ rent, i.e. £11 4s. 8d. Gill having surrendered his interest in these tenements, the Queen, being petitioned for them, has granted them by letters patent dated 18 Nov. 1564 to William Sheres, in reversion for 31 years [see the Calendar of Patent Rolls, 1563–1566, p. 342]. The correspondent is therefore directed to repay Gill or the bringer of the letter £11 4s. 8d., and take an acquittance in return.

(In the hand of an amanuensis. Signed by Winchester and Mildmay. Examined by Christopher Smyth, clerk of the pipe.)

Letter from the Marquess of Winchester and Walter Mildmay to Richard Stanley, one of the tellers of the Receipt

Humphrey Shelton, auditor of the Receipt, has worked diligently in his reckonings with the tellers, and they are now brought to ‘good and perfecte order’. It has come to light that one annuity of £40 a year, granted by the house of St John of Jerusalem for thirty years to Thomas Hennage, gentleman, has been paid for 4½ years after the end of the term, and that another annuity of £20 a year granted by Queen Mary to Edmund Beningfild, gentleman, for the term of his life, has been paid for three years after his death. A total of £240 is therefore to be paid back to the Queen. In consideration of these discoveries and of Shelton’s diligence and service they have allowed him £60. Stanley is to pay Shelton this sum and obtain a quittance in return.

(In the hand of an amanuensis. Signed by Winchester and Mildmay.)

Inscriptions from alba amicorum

On the front cover is stamped ‘CL [i.e. 150] Orginal-Handschriften [sic] Welt-Berümter Männer’. Three or four letters have been scraped away after ‘CL’.

The contents of the book are mostly autograph inscriptions on slips, removed from various alba amicorum. Each slip typically contains a moral injunction or other text (most of which have been quoted in the individual descriptions), a complimentary message to the recipient, and the name and titles of the writer. A few are painted with arms or other designs. The slips on ff. 8r, 45r, 53r, 62r, 65r, 76r, 77r, 93r, 97r, 98r, 113r, 124r, and 147r have inscriptions on the front and the back.

In the descriptions of the individual items MS ‘j’ and ‘v’ have been printed ‘i’ and ‘u’ respectively where they represent vowels, and breves (˘) have been disregarded. The Greek characters ȣ and ϛ (stigma) been replaced by ου and στ respectively. The sources of texts have sometimes been indicated, though they are not usually mentioned on the slips themselves. It should be noted that in many cases the texts are adaptations rather than exact quotations.

Some slips share characteristics with others, indicating that they probably have a common origin. The most obvious of these groups are as follows:

(1) Five fairly small slips, all about 9 cm wide, though clearly trimmed, bearing inscriptions dated at Wittenberg in June and November 1593: ff. 28r, 29r, 51r, 87r, and 104r.

(2) Seven small slips of various sizes, all trimmed, bearing painted coats of arms, all undated but probably of the 17th c.: ff. 4r, 13r, 16r, 17r, 112r, 135r, and 146r.

(3) Nine slips, mostly trimmed but probably originally measuring about 9.5 by 15 cm, three of them written on both sides, bearing inscriptions dated as follows:

Leipzig, 25 Oct. 1667 (f. 53r)
Wittenberg, 27 Feb. 1670 (f. 147r)
Wittenberg, 1 Mar. 1670 (f. 93r, reverse)
Wittenberg, 1 Mar. 1670 (f. 26r)

Wittenberg, 1 Mar. 1670 (f. 86r)
Wittenberg, 1 Mar. 1670 (f. 111r)
[Leipzig], 30 Mar. 1670 (f. 99r)
Leipzig, 1 Apr. 1670 (f. 80r)
Leipzig, 7 Apr. 1670 (f. 147r, reverse)

Leipzig, 25 Apr. 1670 (f. 151r)
Leipzig, 28 Apr. 1670 (f. 93r)
Giessen, 15 May 1670 (f. 150r)

Ulm, [1671 x 1674?] (f. 53r, reverse)
These slips probably came from the album of Balthasar Friedrich Saltzmann, to whom those marked with asterisks are addressed.
(4) Thirty-eight slips, mostly measuring about 9.5 by 15 cm, six of them written on both sides, bearing inscriptions dated as follows:
Darmstadt, 22 Mar. 1709 (f. 77r)
Giessen, 3 Apr. 1709 (f. 90r)
Giessen, 3 Apr. 1709 (f. 14r)
Giessen, 3 Apr. 1709 (f. 142r)

Giessen, 5 Apr. 1709 (f. 136r)
Giessen, 7 Apr. 1709 (f. 77r, reverse)
Frankfurt am Main, 13 Apr. 1709 (f. 119r)
Arnstadt, 25 Sept. 1709 (f. 45, reverse)
Arnstadt, 26 Sept. 1709 (f. 107r)
[Leipzig], 6 Dec. 1709 (f. 106r)
Leipzig, 8 Dec. 1709 (f. 115r)
Leipzig, 9 Dec. 1709 (f. 76r)
Leipzig, 10 Dec. 1709 (f. 76r, reverse)

Leipzig, 11 Dec. 1709 (f. 11r)
Jena, 3 Mar. 1710 (f. 95r)
Jena, 20 May 1710 (f. 145r)
Jena, 21 May 1710 (f. 85r)
Jena, 22? May 1710 (f. 44r)
Jena, 22 May 1710 (f. 65r)
Jena, 28 May 1710 (f. 23r)
Jena, 29 May 1710 (f. 36r)
[Jena], May 1710 (f. 8r)
Halle, 4 Oct. 1710 (f. 20r)
Halle, 13 Nov. 1710 (f. 97r)
Halle, Nov. 1710 (f. 5r)
Halle, 22 Mar. 1711 (f. 84r)
Halle, 30 Apr. 1711 (f. 46r)
Halle, 13? May 1711 (f. 97r, reverse)
Leipzig, 13 May 1711 (f. 65r)
Wittenberg, 29 May 1711 (f. 83r)
Wittenberg, May 1711 (f. 42r)
Wittenberg, May 1711 (f. 31r)
Dresden, May 1711 (f. 109r)
Frankfurt an der Oder, 10 June 1711 (f. 32r)
Celle, 25 July 1711 (f. 88r)
Berlin, 29 June 1711 (f. 123r)
Hamburg, 20 Aug. 1711 (f. 8r, reverse)
Bremen, 28 Aug. 1711 (f. 92r)
Franeker, 7 Sept. 1711 (f. 138r)

Franeker, 7 Sept. 1711 (f. 62r, reverse)
Amsterdam, 12 Oct. 1711 (f. 39r)
Leiden, 17 Oct. 1711 (f. 62r)
The Hague, 21 Oct. 1711 (f. 96r)*
[Weimar], [1702 x 1725] (f. 45r)

Each of these slips is numbered in the top right-hand corner on one side, but there is no obvious pattern to the numbering. The slips probably came from the album of Elias Silberrad, to whom those marked with asterisks are addressed.

It may also be noted that there are two inscriptions dated at Lützelstein in 1618 (ff. 49r and 69r), two at Giessen in 1653 (ff. 43r and 56r), two at Jena on 10 April 1654 (ff. 30r and 101r), two at Leiden in 1713 (ff. 3r and 102r), seven at Halle in April 1717 (ff. 47r, 67r, 70r, 122r, 124r, 131r, and 148r), three at Halle in October 1740 (ff. 10r, 81r, 98r), and three at Jena in July 1741 (ff. 57r, 63r, and 68r).

Inscription by Johann Capnio

Nine lines, beginning ‘Si mihi sint vires, et prædia magna: quid inde?’ Addressed to ‘Dn: Alberto Wessenero’ (dative).

Inscription by David Magirus

‘Fide Deo, Mundum despice, disce mori.’ Probably written at Tübingen. The writer’s title is ‘D[ominus] et Prof[essor] Jur[is] Tubing:’.

Inscription by Polycarp Leyser the elder

‘Nos prece, non aliis armis pugnemus inermes, | Qui prece se munit, cum prece victor erit.’ (Cf. P. Leyser, Officium pietatis, quod B. D. Polycarpo Lysero seniori … debuit [1704], p. 192.) Dated at Wittenberg.

Inscription by Anton Euonymus

‘Da mihi, Christe Deus, quæ das tibi sanguine junctis, | Coelica, Christe, mihi sanguine parta tuo.’ Dated at Wittenberg.

Inscription by Jacob Furman

‘Non potest malè mori, qui bene vixit: et vix bene moritur, qui malè vixit.’ (Augustine.) Dated ‘Dom. 1. post Trinit. 93.’ Probably written at Wittenberg. The writer’s title is ‘in Acad[emia] Witt[enbergensi] Pr[ofessor] P[ublicus].’

Inscription by Hieronymus Nyman

‘Mente colas Christum, prosis multis, noceasque | Nemini, amesque bonos, sustineasque malos.’ Dated at Wittenberg. Nyman’s title and position at Meissen has been added in a different hand.

Inscription by Johann Peter Weidtmann

‘Si nobis est testis in coelo, si in corde, dimittamus alios loqui foris, quod volunt.’ ‘Non pendebit Christus semper inter Latrones, resurget aliquando crucifixa Veritas.’ ‘Ich laß die Welt sein Welt, verlasse ihren Shein | Du aber höochster Geld, vernügst mich allein.’(??) Motto: ‘Tandem Veronenses sunt acceptiores Placentinis.’

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