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Additional Manuscripts c Paul, Charles Kegan (1828-1902) publisher
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Letter from C. Kegan Paul to Henry Sidgwick

Expresses his pleasure at receiving Sidgwick's letter, and at the news that the latter had joined the Free Christian Union. Reports that the anniversary meeting is that day or the next, but he is unable to attend. Hopes that Sidgwick will go. Expresses his anxiety in relation to the Church of England. Refers to Tyndale [John Tyndall?]'s theory on spiritualism, and observes that the Physical Science men 'seem to leave out of sight the fact that if they have no emotional side to their own nature, it is a very important element in the nature of most people.'

Explains that he has been too busy during the previous two months to read very much material that was not connected with his work. Declares a book by 'Miss Ogle', [Lady Verney] Stone Edge, to be 'a pretty and restful novel'. Refers also to The Lost Love, and to the fact that people say that it was written by a Lady Verney. States that [ ] B[ ] has taken up much of his time, because he has been reviewing him for the Theological Review. Asks Sidgwick if he has read a book called the French Revolution by Heinrich von Sybel [1867] History of the French Revolution].

Announces that he is going abroad with three or four of his pupils, and that Mr Paul is accompanying them; they start on Monday 3 August for the Rhine as far as Constance, and then maybe go by Munich and Prague to Dresden, where they intend to stay a fortnight, and get home about 10 September. Between that date and 12 October he hopes that Sidgwick will be able to visit them, and suggests that it would be nice if he came to Dresden. Tells him to come before 3 August if he is unable to come after their return, but is unsure when they will be able to receive him. Explains that one of his sisters is to be married, and is coming to stay, along with her fiancé. Tells Sidgwick to let him know when he can come.

Paul, Charles Kegan (1828-1902) publisher

Letter from C. Kegan Paul to Henry Sidgwick

Claims that he was about to write to Sidgwick in relation to Gardiner's volumes of the Morning Watch. Gives the address to which to send them if he is finished with them. Thinks he may be able to be in London 'about the 5th', and proposes that Sidgwick return with him, and stay as long as he can. Announces that he must go to Bath for a few days, and would do so when Sidgwick goes to Clifton. Declares that his time will be almost entirely his own in London, and he shall be staying with [Samuel?] Gardiner close to [ ] [ ] and Martineau's. Confides in Sidgwick that he has had a very heavy financial loss, which might cause him to give up his visit to London. Hopes that he may not have to change his plans, except by taking on extra pupils, 'and writing a little harder' for the following few months. Claims that unless he can go to London 'cheerfully', he should not be much good as a free Christian. Declares that they must 'try and [ ] Payne on the Pall Mall [Gazette?], which is getting sadly reactionary.' Also informs him that he has 'a very singular spirit, ghost, or dream, story' for Sidgwick when they meet.

Paul, Charles Kegan (1828-1902) publisher

Letter from C. Kegan Paul to Henry Sidgwick

Explains that he had intended to write to Sidgwick many times since [J.B.] Payne's death, but the latter event affected him so much that he did not have the heart to do so. Tells how he was looking forward to Payne's visit, when the latter's brother contacted him to tell him that he had died. Recounts that their last meeting was when he [Kegan Paul] was on his way to preach the Free Christian Union sermon, and that after the 'misrepresentation of it in the Pall Mall [Gazette], Payne tried to persuade the Editor 'to set the report right'. Expresses the wish that Sidgwick will come to visit in the autumn.

Reports that the Cornishes have been to visit, as well as several other friends, but that some pupils who had been coming to him were no longer being sent by their parents, because of the sermon he preached at the Free Christian Union. Refers to a paper he has just sent to Beard or Renan, and fears that Sidgwick will think that he is 'hedging on the orthodox side' in it. Reports that Cornish is reviewing [W.E.H. ?]Lecky in the same Theological Review. Remarks that Dakyns was very good to him, and sent him 'all sorts of information' about Brighton College. Announces that he is sending Louis back to Brighton, and that he gave Dakyns' information 'to a [ ] who is going to send his boys there.' Asks Sidgwick to give him 'a bed somewhere in Oct[obe]r' if he doesn't come to visit,

Paul, Charles Kegan (1828-1902) publisher

Letter from C. Kegan Paul to Henry Sidgwick

Reports that he has mentioned the case of the Westminster Review 'to several rich and liberal friends with indifferent success.' Reports that Mr [Bastard] has already given £100 to Dr Chapman 'in a similar emergency'. Mentions that he was speaking about the matter the previous day to 'a strong political liberal, a friend of [Bright's]' who has written for the publication, and who 'was expressing the same doubts as Bastard, of Dr Chapman' in relation to the latter's running of the Theological Review. Mentions that H.B. Wilson, who writes the precis of the theological books at the end [of the journal] also felt the same way about Dr Chapman. Suggests that a subscription be formed to buy the publication from Chapman, and to appoint Wilson or someone similar as editor. Announces that a man is going to send his son to him as a pupil because of the sermon he gave at the Free Christian Union.. Agrees with much of what Sidgwick wrote of Renan, and is glad that he has written on Clough. Refers to Rawlins and the influence of Cobb. He read 'the Resurrection poem' to the latter, who was 'simply shocked'.

Paul, Charles Kegan (1828-1902) publisher

Letter from C. Kegan Paul to Henry Sidgwick

Reports that he had no time to see Martineau, but that he wrote to him the previous day, 'having the sequel of the Clerical Meeting correspondence, which has hitherto interested him to enclose.' Relates that he has 'jogged him about the Essays, and hope he may do something about them.' If he does not, Paul believes that some of their number ought to write independent papers, 'of which the most important would be the question of the Creeds in worship.' Reports that the Clerical Society met the previous Tuesday, and passed three resolutions relating to Paul's membership of the Free Christian Union, including one that states that in case of his declining to withdraw from the latter organisation, he should cease to be a member of the Clerical Society. Paul states that he has declined, and supposes that he has ceased to be a member of the Society. Observes that it is akin to an excommunication, and that some of his friends have told him that he shall be damned. Reports that he had a 'satisfactory talk with Hewitt' about his health.

Paul, Charles Kegan (1828-1902) publisher

Letter from C. Kegan Paul to Henry Sidgwick

Refers to the possible futility of writing 'all this', and that it is probably that the old organisations 'will become [more] narrow and exclusive, the old priesthoods, more priestly...' Claims that on the whole his faith is sure 'that a Catholic Church, and a theology not at variance with sense and science is possible and that if [they] only work it may be found to be nearer at hand than one thinks in more despondent moods.' Expresses his regret that W.G. Clark 'goes out'. Claims himself to be 'very content to stay.' Declares that his own position is very clear to himself, and that he has tried to make it clear to others. Asks whether Clark wrote a pamphlet about the Church of the Future. Asks Sidgwick to send it to him if he has a copy. Announces that he was going 'to Town to marry Augusta Ritchie, but [in] [the] present dearth of pupils find it more prudent to stay at home and save...money.' Claims that the 'Liberal Editor of a local paper allows one to blow off steam in weekly articles for him, which is really a great refreshment and safety valve.' [incomplete]

Paul, Charles Kegan (1828-1902) publisher

Letter from C. Kegan Paul to Henry Sidgwick

Reports that his paper was too long to find admission in the April issue of the Theological Review. Has made 'considerable alterations in it', and has explained his meaning; is unsure whether even now the paper would satisfy Sidgwick, or that the latter 'would accept its words as fully and adequately representing the mind of the [Free Christian] Union.' Intends to send the paper to Martineau as soon as Beard sends it back to him. Believes that, as it is materially altered, 'it is only right to try so far to fulfil [his] promise to F.C. Union.' Asks Sidgwick when they are to meet. Informs him that his wife is going to Torquay on Easter Eve, and that he shall have a week alone, and that he may have to lecture on behalf of the League at [Bownce] and Swanage. Would be most happy for Sidgwick to visit during that time. Announces that he is going to Bath on the 25th for his sister's wedding, and shall spend one day at Clifton. Then he will be back home again until 4th, when he is taking Louis to Eton. Promises to give Sidgwick meat and wine as always, even though he has been on a vegetarian diet for six weeks.

Paul, Charles Kegan (1828-1902) publisher

Letter from C. Kegan Paul to Henry Sidgwick

Declares that he wishes Sidgwick's pamphlet were longer, and that, contrary to the latter's opinion, he does not seriously disagree with it. Refers to Sidgwick's discussion of the importance of belief, especially that of a minister in the doctrine, and the conflict between one's disbelief, and one's continuation in the recitation of the Creed. Puts forward the scenario whereby a minister 'does not avow his disbelief in the doctrine' and does not think that this is significant enough to cause him to quit the Church. Observes that in theology two people may say the same thing, but one can be accepted and the other criticised for it, as in, for example, the case of Stanley and William. The former said in his Jewish Lectures that Abraham 'was tempted to slay his son by the fact that human sacrifice was part of the false religions he found in Syria', and 'Williams said the same, and no statement was more fiercely assailed in the whole volume of Essays and Reviews.' Tells Sidgwick to expand his pamphlet if it reaches a second edition.

Refers to the dissolution of the Free Christian Union. Asks if Sidgwick will come to visit them in the summer. Tells him that he has permission to take him to see 'some most remarkable Spirit drawings', drawn by a child of eleven. Reports that Louis has gone to Eton, 'where he has made a fair start', and that he is with Marindin. Fears that Cornish is very unwell. Informs him that Margaret [Paul's wife] 'has a little tale in the press called *Three Weddings8, which is simple and good.'

Paul, Charles Kegan (1828-1902) publisher

Letter from C. Kegan Paul to Henry Sidgwick

Reports that his 'fat friend the Vicar of Blandford [J. R. Quirke] has made himself a Brewer, and sent his son to Aldenham', and his [Paul's] tenant Mr Martin 'will most likely do so too'. Asks whether Sidgwick is coming to stay and gives details about his pupils' comings and goings. Announces that he may spend a few days at Croydon after Christmas. Reports that pupils are returning to him. Wishes that someone - Sidgwick or Martineau 'for Cookson has been really but a figure head' - should draw up reasons for the dissolution of the F[ree] C[hristian] U[nion]', and states that it is not too late as it does not dissolve until December. Refers to France and to his German and Prussian sympathies. Remarks that France 'is taking her undoubted success at Orleans so [ ] [ ] that even Gambretta is beginning to be once more respectable.'

Paul, Charles Kegan (1828-1902) publisher

Letter from C. Kegan Paul to Henry Sidgwick

Asks Sidgwick if he has mastered Hegelian philosophy. Reminds him that they are all looking to him or John Mozley or both to tell them what he [Hegel] means. Remarks that [Septimus?] Hansard once said that 'he conceived his 'mission' was to translate Maurice to the people. Refers to W.D. Rawlin's 'funny voyage to America with Tom Hughes; remarks that '[w]hatever else it does for him it will probably deliver him from the [ ] represented by The Kiss of Peace.' Asks Sidgwick if he knows who wrote G[ ] Balz. Suspects that it might be Trevelyan, 'if it is not too good for the writer of C[ ].' Hopes to see Sidgwick at Christmas. Reports that he took Louis back to Eton, mainly in order that he may see Cornish, who, he reports, is quite well, and has not yet learnt the Gospel according to Matthew. Claims that it is not easy to have too many Cornishes, 'if they all take after their father.' [incomplete]

Paul, Charles Kegan (1828-1902) publisher

Letter from C. Kegan Paul to Henry Sidgwick

Asks Sidgwick if he can come in the vacation. Gives details of his movements; he is to stay where he is until 26 December, when he will go to Bath and Clifton, where he will stay until 31 December. On Monday 2 January he plans to go to Freshwater, and then on to London, and intends to be back about 14 January. Assures Sidgwick that his arrangements could be modified to suit his visit. Asks if there is any chance of his being in London during the week in which he will be there. Announces that he will be staying at [ ]'s house at Croydon. Expresses regret that he was not 'at the last dying speech and confession of the F[ree] C[hristian] U[nion]'. Refers to the fact that Martineau is to preach for Fr [Seeffield] the following day. Remarks that 'Stanley's plan is fairly open to the objections which Baldwin Brown urged against it.' Declares that they are 'in the throes of having either to give much more aid to Schools than has ever been given, or be rated.' Wishes the parish to accept the [ ] [ ] system 'freely and frankly', but fears they will try to keep the school as it is at present, 'but not liberally enough to avoid eventually coming on the rates.' Refers to the strangeness of '[t]he sort of sentimental affection without reality which men have for the Church of England'. Supposes that Sidgwick is glad to see Bradley's election, and remarks that it must be a great blow for the [ ]-Bright party.

Paul, Charles Kegan (1828-1902) publisher

Letter from C. Kegan Paul to Henry Sidgwick

Expresses his desire to know about Sidgwick's scheme for correspondence teaching. Wanted to invite him to their house during the summer, but their plans were upset by Paul's catching the small pox early in August. Refers to the amusement he derived from the reports of his death, and from some of the views passed on his character and conduct while alive, and refers to the fact that the clergy of a clerical society to which he no longer belongs 'thought of attending [his] funeral, and then recoiled at the thought of the possible danger of infection'. Asks Sidgwick to recommend 'any simple book of applied mathematical problems...which takes e.g. the 3 first Bks of Euclid, and gives practical applications of the various problems. Remarks that 'Nancy shows a remarkable aptitude for Mathematics, but becomes impatient of theory, and wants to see how the things she learns have a bearing on life and its doings.' Suggests that if Sidgwick can tell him of such a book, it can be sent to him by Deighton and Bell. Asks Sidgwick's opinion on the Dialectical Society's "Report on Spiritualism". Does not think a great deal of it 'if one subtract Mr Home and Mrs Guppy'. Believes the latter to be 'an [arrant] humbug', and remarks that she '[brought] flowers in the dark, but then so did Mr S[ ] the conjuror in the light, at [ ] a few evenings ago.' Asks how things are at Rugby. Refers to the case of two boys who are orphans there.

Paul, Charles Kegan (1828-1902) publisher

Letter from C. Kegan Paul to Henry Sidgwick

Informs Sidgwick that he and his family are to leave at Easter, and are going to live in or near London. He intends to resign his living, and then take 'the legal steps necessary for setting aside Orders.' Feels legally bound to stay on where he is for a few months, since he is on the school board, which he had established himself, and 'must preside over the [ ] of the Parish Schools, which are vested in the Vicar, and the Board Schools.' He intends to draw no further income from the living, and to resign as soon as possible. Announces that he is going to do the same sort of work for [H. S.] King that he had previously been doing, but now on a larger scale. In relation to his financial affairs, declares that they have 'enough to buy bread and cheese'. States that his wife is at one with him in his decision. Does not wish to 'go out with any flourish of trumpets', which is one of the reasons why he does not want to make his resignation 'quite simultaneous with his departure. Mentions that his children are unhappy about the situation, and are especially distressed about the planned selling of various animals. Reports that his last set of pupils are doing well at Oxford, and that he has 'a pleasant set now'. Hopes that Sidgwick will come to visit him for a day or two as soon as term is over.

Paul, Charles Kegan (1828-1902) publisher

Letter from C. Kegan Paul to Henry Sidgwick

Reports that he is recovering from a concussion of the brain, which he sustained about a month previously, and that the injury causes him to make mistakes in language and spelling. Explains that he was knocked down in London. Agrees that 'it will be well to continue the use of the money to Newnham', but thinks that they 'shall carry out Miss Bathurst's wishes'. Suggests making Mrs Sidgwick, 'and afterwards any future principal of Newnham', a personal trustee. States that if Sidgwick thought that one of the Darwins would be amenable to be appointed as trustee, that he [Paul] would retire, since he knows that Mrs Bathurst would not have appointed him had she known that he was likely to become Catholic. Tells Sidgwick to write to W.H. Gray, informing him that he had communicated with Paul, 'at the old address.' Declares that Sidgwick is 'most kind in offering to bring up the fund to a round sum.' Sends his regards to Mrs Sidgwick. Reports that his son-in-law [Rendel] 'has gone to [ ] on business for the winter', and therefore 'Ruth and her three children are almost next door for the [winter]'.

Paul, Charles Kegan (1828-1902) publisher

Letter from C. Kegan Paul to Henry Sidgwick

Dictated letter. Expresses his gratitude to Sidgwick for his note, 'and to Mrs Sidgwick for acting as secretary'. Fears that Sidgwick might be doing too much. Mentions that he may be moving to Poole Harbour in a couple of weeks for several weeks, if he is able for the journey. Invites Sidgwick to come also, if he is able to. Is very pleased that Sidgwick and his [Paul's] 'dear friend Father Tyrell [George Tyrrell] have become friends.' States that the latter is now at Richmond in Yorkshire, and that he will tell him that he [Paul] has 'a somewhat cheering account' of Sidgwick.

Paul, Charles Kegan (1828-1902) publisher

Letter from C. Kegan Paul to Henry Sidgwick

Regrets that he cannot come to visit Sidgwick in Cambridge that year. Explains that he could not leave home before 16 December, and that [Francis Warre?] Cornish is coming to stay on 20 December. Invites Sidgwick to visit him on his way to [John Jermyn?] Cowell, or after his visit. Informs him that if he comes soon after Christmas he will find [John Burnell?] Payne there, and probably Dr [David?] and Mrs Rowland. Mentions that [Oscar?] Browning might also pay a visit. Describes the search for water by 'young Okeden', and how it was discovered that an underground stream to a well in the village ran from north to south. Reports that the 'Tennyson boys' told him that the Times reported that their father had changed college 'in consequence of a quarrel with her bread and butter'. States that Tennyson was in no other college but Trinity.

Paul, Charles Kegan (1828-1902) publisher

Letter from C. Kegan Paul to Henry Sidgwick

Reports that Reginald Marsden of Merton '[ ] of the Oxford Eight' is a medium, 'and very much interested in Spiritualism.' Informs Sidgwick that Marsden 'is intimate with the Milner Gibsons', and other spiritual people. Explains that he has asked the latter to put himself in communication with Sidgwick, as he believes that if the two join forces, they could 'work out something.' States that [ ] 'is very wild in the matter, but he knows interesting people'; suggests that Sidgwick look him up. Gives his address in Croydon, and mentions that he is in town most days. Thanks Sidgwick for writing to Chapman, and invites him to come and see them. Claims that he can, through Dr [Elliston], get Sidgwick an introduction to Dr Ashburner, and offers to introduce him to Mr [De Morgan].

Paul, Charles Kegan (1828-1902) publisher

Letter from C. Kegan Paul to Henry Sidgwick

Expresses regret that Sidgwick did not come to visit them [in Weymouth]. Invites him to come should he get the work done 'before term begins' or any other time. Announces that they go home that day. Refers to 'the increase of difficulties with regard to the Church of England.' Declares that his doubts about the possibility of holding his position 'gain ground daily'. Is thinking of asking the Bishop [of Oxford?] for leave of non-residence for a year, and taking a house [in Weymouth], where he could work quietly with his pupils 'and at literature', and 'consider the whole matter of conscience'. Reports that Chapman is pleased with his paper. Declares that he wants to write 'a decent article...on the chastity or unchastity of schoolboys, and the uses and abuses of the confessional'. Asks Sidgwick to read, and give his opinion on, a paper of his on the Bishop of S[ ] in the July issue of the Theological Review.

Paul, Charles Kegan (1828-1902) publisher

Letter from C. Kegan Paul to Henry Sidgwick

Asks Sidgwick to 'procure and send [to him] specimen papers given to pass men at the Previous Examination, and final examinations at Cambridge'. Explains that he has with him a pupil 'who is very stupid, but wishes much to take a degree', and he [Kegan Paul] believed that Cambridge requirements for 'pass men' are below the Oxford standards. Refers to an enclosed letter [not included], which relates to a document which he sends by Book Post, and which he believes will interest Sidgwick because it is 'an attempt at a more progressive Religion [than they] as yet seem able to attain.' Declares that in answer to the letter he consented, provisionally, 'to be on the Committee', and that the paper he sends to Sidgwick is the 'draft scheme, which may be modified when the Committee really meets.' Would like to hear Sidgwick's views on the paper, and asks him to return it at the end of the week. Gives his own criticisms of the paper, and words and phrases that he would substitute in the original text. Doubts whether ' the admission of Congregations, and the establishment of a Central Church wouldn't be an evil, by adding inevitability to the number of sects, in spite of all endeavours to the contrary.' Claims that the representation of Congregations 'would throw the power of such a Congress as is contemplated mainly into the hands of those who have pledged themselves to the negation of certain dogmas, which is a different thing to the dislike of Dogma altogether.' Reminds Sidgwick that the paper is private, but tells him that he may show it 'to anyone likely in the main to sympathize.' Refers to the effect of his views on his own position as a member of the clergy, but claims that he cannot feel he would be doing right in giving up his position. Claims that [Congreve] has nearly convinced him 'that names ought always to be signed to what people write', and if he continues to write with this conviction the question of his remaining where he is may not impossibly be settled for him. Reports that he saw Sidgwick's brother in Oxford the other day and that there was a rumour that he was to take the incumbency of Merton Chapel, 'and make it a centre of liberalism'. Claims that 'the pendulum has swung the other way, and all the young people at Oxford are virtually Catholic.' Inquires as to whether Sidgwick is coming to visit them at Christmas. States that they shall be there [Bailie, Wimborne] most of the time, 'but may go to London after Christmas for a week or ten days.'

Paul, Charles Kegan (1828-1902) publisher

Letter from C. Kegan Paul to Nora Sidgwick

Tells Nora not to reply; has asked Arthur Benson to let him know how Henry is from time to time. Expresses his sympathy with Nora, and asks her to give his love to Henry, who is 'one of the best and truest friends' he ever had. Is pained to hear of his suffering.

Paul, Charles Kegan (1828-1902) publisher

Letter from C. Kegan Paul to Henry Sidgwick

Thanks Sidgwick for the books. Would like to have the 'Draft Scheme' returned to him 'at some time or other', but explains that he has sent his notes independently of it, and does not need it at once. Urges Sidgwick to show it 'to whom it may concern', but warns him that it is not as yet public and it is intended for members of 'the Committee'. Informs him that he has mentioned his name to the Secretary as interested in the scheme, and that Sidgwick may hear from a Mr E. Enfield [see ADD.MS.c/93/124]. Explains that his pupils will not leave him until 16 [December]; otherwise he 'would go with pleasure to see' Sidgwick. Expresses his preference for Cambridge over Oxford, and also his regret that he cannot join Sidgwick for a few days in Paris, saying that 'the present state of Royal Mail Shares makes the Workhouse or the Gaol look much more likely building than the Louvre.' Says he may get to London, where they may meet, if Sidgwick cannot come to see him where he is.

Asks after Cowell and Mozley. Declares that the four [ ] on the Psalms to be funny. States that 'there is such a serene ignorance, or assumed ignorance of the wrath of the Orthodox.' Wishes that the outward form of the book were less 'Macmillan ish.' Recommends that he reads Madame Roland's book on the Revolution, and comments that her unedited letters are a 'take [on], being nearly all anterior to her real interest of the time.' Declares that he must stop writing as a pupil has arrived 'wanting a lecture on S. John[']s Gospel'.

Paul, Charles Kegan (1828-1902) publisher

Letter from C. Kegan Paul to Henry Sidgwick

Reports that Andrew has been 'for a quarter at school at Bath', but that 'Prescote Hewett the London Surgeon is clear that Bath is too relaxing for the boy, and that he must go to Brighton.' Claims that he has been to Brighton, and has seen many of the three-hundred schools said to exist there, but that he was particularly impressed with Brighton College. Since most of the masters there are Cambridge men, he asks Sidgwick his opinion of them; 'if the teaching is likely to be good, and if they are men to whom one would do well to trust a boy of decided ability, but bird-witted and un-concentrative.' Is contemplating letting the boy remain at Brighton, and making it his only school, 'instead of sending him...to Rugby.' Reports that he begins work again with his boys that day. Refers to the turning of the year, and to the fact that he is still in the Church of England, despite his difficulties. Reports that Dr [R.] Williams wrote to him about the Free Christian Union, saying that it is 'a very nice thing for Christians unattached'. Hopes that it may 'offer help to some who are attached also.' Asks Sidgwick if he has made up his mind about joining it. Informs him that some more men are needed on the Committee, and hopes that Sidgwick might be inclined to join. Asks him to let him hear about 'B[righton] College' when he can find the time. Also remarks that [ ], a [Trinity] fellow, is a son of the Secretary of Brighton College, and had no education 'except these.'

Paul, Charles Kegan (1828-1902) publisher

Letter from C. Kegan Paul to Henry Sidgwick

Reports that he found [F.D.?] Maurice 'much better' on his arrival, but that three little girls are in bed with measles. Declares that it is a comfort after his 'pleasant week' at Cambridge not to have to prove the truth of the following lines from a poem by Newman: "'When mirth is full and free Some sudden gloom must be.'" Claims that he hardly ever returns home 'without anticipating calamity.' Declares that he bought Dr. Newman's Poems in London, and tells Sidgwick that he will be pleased with them. Observes that '[t]here is something very tender and courageous in his publishing now some lines he addressed to Frank Newman on the day the latter came of age, when J. Henry Newman was [first] ordained, and the two brothers were full of Evangelical fervour.' Refers to 'The Dream of Gerontius' as 'a striking poem', and discusses his own view of Purgatory, which is like neither Newman's nor Dante's. Refers to an enclosed letter [not included], relating to the general meeting of the Free Christian Union. Asks Sidgwick to let him know if he intends to join, when he returns E. Enfield's letter. Declares that they 'are all very sorry for Theodore, and induced to think Napier was hard on him.'

Paul, Charles Kegan (1828-1902) publisher