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Additional Manuscripts c Stephen, Sir Leslie (1832-1904) Knight, author
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Letter from Leslie Stephen to Henry Sidgwick

States that he has read Sidgwick's criticism of his book [The Science of Ethics], and expresses his satisfaction in having 'a candid and generous critic'. Observes that most of the points at issue between the two would require a treatise instead of a letter. Refers to pain and pleasure, and to how conduct is determined by one or the other. Admits that he 'could have obviated the criticism by a more careful articulation of the logical framework.' Refers to Sidgwick's contention that he exaggerates the novelty of the evolutionist theory 'and especially by overlooking Comte.' Clarifies that if he has done so, it was 'through carelessness of expression', and claims that he has learnt much from Comte, of whom he has a higher estimate than most people, especially scientific people, who object to his religion. States that he believes that [ ] happiness consists 'in the dramatic and friendly affections'. Hopes that they shall always remain friends.

Stephen, Sir Leslie (1832-1904) Knight, author

Letter from Leslie Stephen to Henry Sidgwick

Writes to inform Sidgwick that he has written a review of his book for the Pall Mall Gazette [Fortnightly Review?]. Is unsure as to whether [Morley] will print it or not, as he 'could not manage to get it into a small space'. Claims, on the other hand, that he did not have enough space for a satisfactory review. States that some of Sidgwick's arguments do not quite satisfy him, and that he has written down his reasons, but could not put them into the review. Promises to send them on to Sidgwick if, on re-reading them, they seem worth notice. Claims that he is 'too rusty' in his political economy 'to feel very confident about them', and expresses his admiration for the quantity of hard thinking Sidgwick manages to turn out.

Stephen, Sir Leslie (1832-1904) Knight, author

Letter from Leslie Stephen to Henry Sidgwick

Expresses his eagerness to write in honour of Darwin [on the occasion of the publication of Francis Darwin's Life and Letters of Charles Darwin], but envisages some difficulties, viz., the papers, including the Times, being so full of Darwin 'from every point of view' that it will be difficult 'to make one's voice heard.' Presumes that [J. T. ?] Knowles and others have already arranged for reviews. Refers to Darwin's own autobiography, and suggests that any review should merely say 'read it'. Remarks that F[rancis] Darwin 'may be quite sure that the book has intrinsic interest enough to dispense with any [puffing] or interpreting.' Undertakes to read the book at once, and consider what he can do. Complains of '[t]hat accursed dictionary [of National Biography]', which he describes as a treadmill, but claims that he is getting into a sort of routine, which will give him time to do other things. Claims that he is always trying to get to Cambridge to see his boy [his step-son George Duckworth] there, but doesn't often succeed; hopes to be there one day during the term, and promises to make an effort to see Sidgwick. Expresses his [and Mrs Stephen's) gladness that [Arthur?] Balfour is convalescing.

Stephen, Sir Leslie (1832-1904) Knight, author

Letter from Leslie Stephen to Henry Sidgwick

States that he shall be very proud to talk to Sidgwick's 'Society'. Tells him to fix any time that suits him. Says that he has not got a subject, but expects to be able to come up with something. Announces that he will be in Cambridge soon, and hopes that he will see Sidgwick then.

Stephen, Sir Leslie (1832-1904) Knight, author

Letter from Leslie Stephen to Henry Sidgwick

Thanks Sidgwick for his paper, and undertakes to consult him as to the most desirable topic for his own observations. Remarks that he may be able 'to say something which may annoy somebody without touching upon freewill or the categorical imperative'. Wishes him all success against his 'old enemy the [Hay] Fever.' Complains about his dictionary editing work [for the Dictionary of National Biography]. Relates that he had 'a rather bad upset' a fortnight previously, and has been told to do nothing for another six weeks or so. Regrets not having seen Sidgwick some days before.

Stephen, Sir Leslie (1832-1904) Knight, author

Letter from Leslie Stephen to Henry Sidgwick

Hopes 'to be back in 80 days'. Asks about the possibility of postponing his lecture from May to the following October, but states that if Sidgwick has any difficulty in procuring a substitute, he will fulfil the original engagement. Claims that he pleased to hear of another edition of Sidgwick's book. States that although he doesn't agree with it on many points, he owes a great deal to it. Wishes that Sidgwick 'could get the freewill problem fairly put in a box!' Reports that he has given Sidgwick's message to Symonds, who 'seems to be going on with remarkable steadiness and to be for him in good health.'

Stephen, Sir Leslie (1832-1904) Knight, author

Letter from Leslie Stephen to Henry Sidgwick

States that he ought to have answered Sidgwick sooner, and that he had wanted to say 'yes, but...could not say it without consideration and obtaining permission'. Refers to his illness, and claims that he has been much better of late, but knows that real work would upset him again. Has decided not to pledge himself to anything, and advises Sidgwick 'to make definite arrangements with some less untrustworthy person.' Announces that he hopes to come to Cambridge on the Sunday of the following week and shall try to see Sidgwick then.

Stephen, Sir Leslie (1832-1904) Knight, author

Letter from Leslie Stephen to Henry Sidgwick

Claims to be really ashamed to have been the cause of so much trouble. Explains that his wife is still nervous about his undertaking anything, and fears that he must again 'adjourn' himself 'and let the foundations of morality remain unshaken till October.' Remarks that at his time of life 'recovery is a most wearisomely slow process', but believes himself to be regaining strength. Remarks that if he cannot recover by October, he is unlikely to recover at all.

Stephen, Sir Leslie (1832-1904) Knight, author

Letter from Leslie Stephen to Henry Sidgwick

Mentions that in their list of names for the Dictionary [of National Biography] is Arthur Holmes, who was Sidgwick's contemporary at Cambridge. States that he knew him, but is unable to find any account of his life. Asks Sidgwick to tell him where an account might be found, and if Holmes produced or edited any work 'which makes a notice of him desirable.' Reports that he is slowly, but steadily improving in health, despite an attack of influenza. Is more confident that another summer of idlesness will restore him to working order.

Stephen, Sir Leslie (1832-1904) Knight, author

Letter from Leslie Stephen to Nora Sidgwick

The editor of Mind [G. F. Stout] has asked him to write an obituary notice of Henry Sidgwick for the January 1901 number of the journal. If the article were to be essentially an estimate of Henry's philosophical work, he would prefer to leave it to someone else, and would prefer to write of him on a personal level: due to his [Stephen's] absence from Cambridge 'from a very early period', he knows very little at first hand of Henry's work as Professor [of Moral Science] or his work in relation to the promotion of women's education. Asks Nora if she would care to assist him by referring him to others who could be of use to him in this matter. Intends to be in Cambridge the following Tuesday. Has also written to Nora's brother [Arthur Balfour], and to Arthur Sidgwick.

Stephen, Sir Leslie (1832-1904) Knight, author

Letter from Sir Leslie Stephen to Nora Sidgwick

Has read the paper which Nora sent to him - a note in pencil explains that this paper is on the development of Henry Sidgwick's ethical views - and believes that it ought to be published. Declares that it makes his position clearer 'and shows very strikingly the careful process by which he had thought out his argument'. Has finished the article on Henry [which he was writing for Mind], apart from the conclusion; remarks on the impossibility to do justice to him in such a small space, which led him 'to send that message to Kate.'

Is glad that Nora intends to write a life of Henry based on his correspondence, and is certain that if she can procure the letters she 'may make a profoundly interesting book.' Admits that he had not appreciated the full beauty of Henry's character during his life. Adds that besides what she gave him on Henry and the articles in the Cambridge Review, he has come across a note 'in Venn' about the founding, by Venn, Mayor and Henry Sidgwick, of 'a little "Grote Club" in a meeting under John Grote as chairman at Trumpington.' Also refers to a notice in the Charity Organisation Society. Says that he tried, in the limited space available, to point out 'how the philosophy was the natural outcome of the life, without endeavouring to criticize it at all.' Will be at the meeting on the following Monday if he is well enough, staying with Maitland; suggests that he could call on Nora in the afternoon if she wished to see him.

Stephen, Sir Leslie (1832-1904) Knight, author

Letter from Leslie Stephen to Henry Sidgwick

Expresses his embarassment at the trouble he has caused Sidgwick in relation to a promised lecture he was to give to Sidgwick's society. Mentions that he has read 'a recent article upon lectures.' Undertakes to give the lecture in the October term, and states that he is to be away for no more than five or six weeks altogether, and will have 'plenty of time to prepare.' Reports that his health has improved. Asks if there is anything he can do for Sidgwick at Cambridge Mass[achusetts], and states that he starts on 5 June.

Stephen, Sir Leslie (1832-1904) Knight, author

Letter from Sir Leslie Stephen to Nora Sidgwick

Refers to papers that he had put together [not included; for the purposes of writing Henry Sidgwick's obituary for Mind], and thought that Nora might like to have them. Relates the story of Henry having been asked by MacColl, the editor of the Athenaeum, to write on the subject of Darwinism, taking the opposite view to Dr Gray of the British Museum. Thinks that MacColl would be glad to tell Nora if Sidgwick's contribution to the journal included other topics.

Stephen, Sir Leslie (1832-1904) Knight, author

Letter from Sir Leslie Stephen to Nora Sidgwick

Was glad to have Nora's letter, and to hear that she was not dissatisfied with his article on Henry Sidgwick [for Mind]. Notes her corrections, but fears that he will not be able to make use of them because the dictionary article [for the Dictionary of National Biography] 'is necessarily very condensed', and doubts whether it contains any of the inaccuracies she mentions. States that he took the date of the lectureship from a paper given to him by [Henry?] Jackson. Did not mean to imply that Henry Sidgwick 'intentionally stammered: but only that he managed to turn it to account.' Hopes that she may be able to put together the letters and life, and supercede his 'and other ephemeral notices.' Will call on her the next time he is in Cambridge.

Stephen, Sir Leslie (1832-1904) Knight, author

Letter from Leslie Stephen to Henry Sidgwick

Announces that he has undertaken to write a short life of his brother [J.F. Stephen], and is beginning to get together a few materials. Would like to know something about his career as an Apostle. Being unaware of the record-keeping practices of the society, and asks Sidgwick to inform him of the name of the person to whom he should apply in relation to this matter. Expresses his deep regret at the news of Robertson Smith's death.

Stephen, Sir Leslie (1832-1904) Knight, author

Letter from Sir Leslie Stephen to Nora Sidgwick

Thanks Nora for her letter. Quotes a sentence in the autobiographical fragment relating to Henry Sidgwick's interest in psychical research, and his 'hope of direct proof of the continued individual existence which he regarded as necessary from an ethical point of view'; would not quote the words [presumably in the obituary notice of Henry Sidgwick he is writing for the January 1901 issue of Mind], but intimate the general intention, and would make no comment.

Stephen, Sir Leslie (1832-1904) Knight, author

Letter from Leslie Stephen to Henry Sidgwick

States that he is very much obliged by Sidgwick's paper, which he declares to be very interesting and more than he expected to get. Suggests that if any difficulty occurs they will discuss it when they meet at Oxford. Explains that the gap in attendances noticed by Sidgwick 'is accounted for by Fitzjames's [ie J.F. Stephen's] absence from Cambridge for that interval.'

Stephen, Sir Leslie (1832-1904) Knight, author

Letter from Leslie Stephen to Henry Sidgwick

Reports that he has seen both Dr Coit and Muirhead in the past few days. Writes to explain his understanding of the matter to Sidgwick. Reports that he has thought over the scheme a little since speaking to Coit, who proposes to raise a fund for supporting ethical missionaries and wants Muirhead, Stout, Stephens and Sidgwick 'to act as a kind of counselling board and especially as licensing the said lecturers.' Refers to the financial side of the question. Doubts the success of the scheme. Suggests that if Sidgwick is in agreement with him they should make their positions clear.

Stephen, Sir Leslie (1832-1904) Knight, author

Letter from Leslie Stephen to Henry Sidgwick

Believes that Jebb, Myers and Maitland 'are desirable names.' Refers to the 'originators of the scheme who objected to having more than a few [and] when [Stephens] suggested Maitland doubted.' Announces his intention of sending to him at once and asking him to send on to Myers. Believes them to have a good set of names, and announces that he shall propose Maitland when he meets his collaborators. States that he is amused by the caution of Balfour and Lord Rosebery, who, he says, have both learnt to be afraid of commiting themselves to his creed. Thanks Sidgwick for his note.

Stephen, Sir Leslie (1832-1904) Knight, author

Letter from Sir Leslie Stephen to Nora Sidgwick

Should have thanked Nora before for the proofs of The Development of European Polity. Does not find that Henry Sidgwick expresses any disagreement with him in the chapters that he has read. Agrees 'pretty completely with him' and is glad to find certain opinions which he had formed about Hobbes 'confirmed and cleared.' Refers to a 'slip' on page 387, involving a reference to [Maine] and Rousseau. Asks Nora to let him know if she wishes to have the proofs returned to her.

Stephen, Sir Leslie (1832-1904) Knight, author

Letter from Leslie Stephen to Nora Sidgwick

States that the article [by Henry Sidgwick] on Kidd, which also refers to Pearson, is 'Political Prophecy and Sociology' in the National Review of December 1894. Reports that he applied to the librarian at the London Library, and he found out from 'the "Review of Reviews".'

Stephen, Sir Leslie (1832-1904) Knight, author

Letter from Leslie Stephen to Nora Sidgwick

Thanks Nora for 'the somewhat more hopeful view' [about Henry's health], which she conveyed in her letter. Asks her to give him news of Henry when she can, and to thank him for his note of the previous day about 'the meeting'. His own thoughts and hopes will be with both of them at this time; prays that God may give them help. Trusts that Henry will not trouble himself 'about this Academy matter.' Offers to make any arrangements that are needed, and states that he will do so with Mr Jebb and Lord Acton.

Stephen, Sir Leslie (1832-1904) Knight, author

Letter from Leslie Stephen to Henry Sidgwick

Complains about the alterations made to his article, which appeared in that month's issue of Fraser['s Magazine for Town and Country]'. Explains the argument behind one passage that was omitted in the publication, in which his 'general drift was that if you make an action accidental you have no motive for gratitude.' In another omitted passage he had argued that it is right to do 'what will cause most happiness irrespectively of the subject of the happiness...' In yet another excluded passage he had argued that a belief in future rewards and punishments 'would not really reconcile selfishness and utilitarianism, but only (in short) sanction selfishness.' Announces that he will not see Sidgwick at the Ad Eundem as his mother has just died.

Stephen, Sir Leslie (1832-1904) Knight, author

Letter from Leslie Stephen to Henry Sidgwick

Thanks Sidgwick for his letter, but clarifies that his gratitude is for Sidgwick's intention, which was, he assumes, to please the recipient. Reports that he had begun another note to Sidgwick in which he had tried to explain his view of the '"moral sense"', but he found it difficult to make his meaning clear in a short space. Discusses the meaning of approval and disapproval, liking and disliking. States that he has often thought 'of writing an essay on the sense of shame which would bring out the point, but it becomes indecent.'

Stephen, Sir Leslie (1832-1904) Knight, author

Letter from Leslie Stephen to Henry Sidgwick

Reports that he did not see Sidgwick's article on Bentham until a day or two previously, and was please by his 'kind (only too kind) reference' to him. Refers to his omission - pointed out by Sidgwick - in relation to Bentham in his own book, and explains that he had intended 'to add some account of him, both as a [ ] and a political writer' when he revised the book, but failed to do so. Remarks that he does not always agree with Sidgwick, but that the latter always sets him thinking, 'which is the most valuable of intellectual services.' States that he had hoped to see HS at Oxford some days previously, but he did not go. Hopes to see Sidgwick and others 'at future [Ad Eundems?] if the institution survives'. Refers to the increasing solitude of his life, and reports that he is soon 'to lose Miss Thackeray' [due to her forthcoming marriage], which he describes as 'a giant wrench'.

Stephen, Sir Leslie (1832-1904) Knight, author

Letter from Leslie Stephen to Henry Sidgwick

Observes that 'there does not appear to be any English book worth much as a systematic statement of any political theory.' In answer to a question asked by Sidgwick, he suggests the names and works of writers on politics, economy and philosophy, and comments on their writings. Refers to Locke's Treatises on Government; Liberty Lord Bolingbroke's Patriot King; Hume's political essays; any of Burke's works, including the speeches on American taxation and on economical reform, as well as 'the reflexions on [the] French Revolution', which 'preceded Godwin and are therefore not included [ ] by your limit of time...'; Tom Paine; Bentham's Fragment on Government, which, he believes is 'too much in the controversial way and dependent upon [a] Blackstone'; [Priestley]; [Tucker]. Admits that he has given too long a list, and states that his preference would be for Locke, Hume, Burke, Godwin and Bentham.

Stephen, Sir Leslie (1832-1904) Knight, author

Letter from Leslie Stephen to Henry Sidgwick

Confesses that he has unintentionally thrown Sidgwick's letter, which had been signed by Jebb, into the fire. Hopes that he has another copy and expesses his regret. In relation to 'the matter', he admits that he is in some difficulty. Reports that he wrote to [Furnevale] as soon as he got 'his idiotic document', protesting against it and saying that if the [ ] truly had been in any way [ ], he [Stephen] would have resigned at once. The reply said that his views would be considered. Fears that his letter may be seen as condoning [Furnevale's] offence, and explains that he could not sign Sidgwick's letter. Proposes writing to the secretary of the N.I.I. giving notice of a motion for the following meeting, 'saying that the Society disapproves of [his] language and directing their disapproval to be communicated to H. Philipps.' Remarks that after such a letter as Sidgwick's the question 'should be raised in some such way, unless, of course, the Committee gives in at once.'

Stephen, Sir Leslie (1832-1904) Knight, author

Letter from Leslie Stephen to Henry Sidgwick

Written on the occasion of the death of [Mrs Sidgwick's brother, F.M. Balfour] in a climbing accident. States his intention of attempting to answer Sidgwick's question frankly and as clearly as possible. Announces that he is beginning to think 'all this mountaineering indefensible, but stresses that he should not blame either Balfour or himself for not having thought so 'before these terrible accidents.' Discusses the difficulty of laying down precise rules [in relation to mountaineering], and refers to papers he wrote for the Alpine Journal, in which he advised caution. Refers to Mather's and B[ ]'s letter. Discusses the relative merits of guides, and observes that they were more relied upon in the past. Explains that his wife does not wish to trouble Mrs Sidgwick with any expression of sympathy, but assures Sidgwick that she has been constantly thinking of her. States that his natural impulse would lead him to ask Mrs Sidgwick's forgiveness, but acknowledges 'the uselessness of saying anything of that kind.'

Stephen, Sir Leslie (1832-1904) Knight, author