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Additional Manuscripts c Morley, John (1838–1923) 1st Viscount Morley of Blackburn, politician
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Letter from Rt. Hon. John Morley to Henry Sidgwick

Thanks Sidgwick for his book [The Methods of Ethics] which, he remarks, 'looks very attractive in print'. Reports that he has begun to read it 'in the careful manner it deserves.' Hopes that Helen Taylor will write on it for the Fortnightly [Review]; he has sent a copy of it to her at Avignon. Is unsure how she will react to his 'strong dissents from [John Stuart] Mill's theism [ ].' Expresses a desire to speak to Sidgwick about Mill's book.

Morley, John (1838–1923) 1st Viscount Morley of Blackburn, politician

Letter from Rt. Hon. John Morley to Henry Sidgwick

Reminds Sidgwick that he has not yet fulfilled his promise of three years previously to write something for the [Fortnightly?] Review. Asks him if he has not yet had enough of his 'favourite investigation of truth'. Asks him to send something between then and midsummer.

Morley, John (1838–1923) 1st Viscount Morley of Blackburn, politician

Letter from Rt. Hon. John Morley to Henry Sidgwick

Assures Sidgwick that he was right not to hurry to answer his letter. Declares that he would like to have the article proposed by Sidgwick [for the Fortnightly Review], either for May, June, or any month that suits him, and tells him that he is welcome to write two articles of eighteen to twenty pages each, if he so wishes, as this would be preferable to one article of thirty pages. Regrets that he will not be in Cambridge this year. Refers to an enclosed letter from an employee of J.C. Newsom [included: 138/2], of which he says 'I'm afraid religious doubts have less to do with it, than want of sense.' Reports that he heard Sidgwick's 'first [ ] being exhausted', and remarks that 'at the critical moment when your too sensitive conscience made you afraid of "taking in" Macmillan'.

Morley, John (1838–1923) 1st Viscount Morley of Blackburn, politician

Letter from Rt. Hon. John Morley to Henry Sidgwick

Expresses his delight with the proof of Sidgwick's article, which he has just been reading. Claims that it gives him a better idea than ever of Bentham's personality. Praises the 'serious criticisms', and the 'pages [on] the Deontology'. Remarks on the fact that in the ten years he has been editor of the Fortnightly [Review], Sidgwick had never before contributed any work to it. Comments that he believes that '[Helvétius] only picked up an idea that was in the air, when he made the legislator the origin of [ ], and their master.' Mentions Rousseau and his Social Contract, which came out [four] years after De l'Esprit, and refers to the [Physiocrats]. Refers also to Swift's account of L'Esprit. Asks Sidgwick to return his proof as soon as he can, as the preparations for the publication 'are rather late already.'

Morley, John (1838–1923) 1st Viscount Morley of Blackburn, politician

Letter from Rt. Hon. John Morley to Henry Sidgwick

Refers to an enclosed cheque [not included], which he sends with gratitude. Informs him that his 'Socrates or anything else' will be welcome. Refers to the 'rage and fury in the Whig tea-cup at Gladstone's resolutions'. Mentions that he breakfasted with the latter that morning, 'and found him wholly absorbed in an eager controversy with a learned [not odious] Jew pundit as to the [comparative] sense of colour-differences in ancient times.

Morley, John (1838–1923) 1st Viscount Morley of Blackburn, politician

Letter from Rt. Hon. John Morley to Henry Sidgwick

Asks Sidgwick why he did not come to Brighton 'instead of fleeing to Broadstairs'. Expresses his eagerness to receive Balfour's writings. Mentions that he is going to print a paper of the latter's on the new conditions of the Indian Civil service, in his next numbers [of the Fortnightly Review]. Complains that being a writer for the Encyclopaedia Britannica is a thankless job: 'One must try to be thorough and yet there is no room.' Predicts that Sidgwick 'will be amused by a short note of Pattison's...against Bridges' in his next number [Fortnightly Review, Aug 1877, 22(128), pp. 285-286].

Morley, John (1838–1923) 1st Viscount Morley of Blackburn, politician

Letter from Rt. Hon. John Morley to Henry Sidgwick

Assures Sidgwick that he would gladly look at anything he sent, but warns him of the unlikelihood of a paper on Self-Deception by an unknown hand being printed. States that if Sidgwick were to write such a paper, it would probably be printed. Jokingly puts forward the suggestion that 'every writer sh[oul]d play Herod and massacre every literary aspirant for twenty years to come.' This, he claims, 'would give people time to digest the Methods of Ethics and other fine books'. Tells him to send his 'young man's MS.', and also something of his own.'

Morley, John (1838–1923) 1st Viscount Morley of Blackburn, politician

Letter from Rt. Hon. John Morley to Henry Sidgwick

Expresses the opinion that Sidgwick's papers 'will be extremely welcome' to the next Fortnightly Review. Observes that the [study? ] of Political Economy 'is just at that point where such calm and penetrating criticisms as [Sidgwick's] is urgently needed.' Explains that he had asked [Icarus] 'to come into the field, but he is busy'. Asks when the papers will be ready for the press. Asks Sidgwick to let him know, and tells him that he will send him the printer's address.

Morley, John (1838–1923) 1st Viscount Morley of Blackburn, politician

Letter from Rt. Hon. John Morley to Henry Sidgwick

Assures Sidgwick of his willingness to print his papers in the Fortnightly Review. Believes that 'there is now a public for these economic discussions'. Asks Sidgwick to send the papers to him, and enquires how many there are, and at what intervals shall he receive them. With regard to the contents of the journal, announces that 'Cliffe Leslie is to demolish Lowe and continue [ ]'s attack' [of] the January issue in February. Asks Sidgwick if he would like his papers to begin in January, and if he wishes them to appear consecutively. Remarks on the brevity of the paper sent to him. Apologises for not having replied to his not more promptly. Asks if he would like to begin in the December number.

Morley, John (1838–1923) 1st Viscount Morley of Blackburn, politician

Letter from Rt. Hon. John Morley to Henry Sidgwick

Explains that he has promised to insert 'a sort of reply to Lowe by [Cliffe] Leslie' in the Fortnightly Review, and that it should appear in the January number. Hopes that Sidgwick will not object to the delay. Declares that he likes Sidgwick's programme, and hopes that 'it will do good.' Political economy, he says however, is in a bad way. Announces that he is writing the letter 'under the venerable shade of One [Ash.] Rochdale.

Morley, John (1838–1923) 1st Viscount Morley of Blackburn, politician

Letter from Rt. Hon. John Morley to Henry Sidgwick

In relation to the length of Sidgwick's papers to be submitted for publication in the Fortnightly Review, Morley advises between fifteen and twenty pages. Tells him to send his MS. to Virtue and Co., London. States his intention of directing his energies the following Spring to bringing Sidgwick into the [Athenaeum] Club. Assumes that P[ ] will again propose him. Promises to send him a list of the Committee 'when the time comes'. Expresses regret that Lord Acton has retired, as he voted for Sidgwick the previous year. Claims to be in bad spirits, on account of his fortieth birthday. Claims that he has not yet made his choice 'among the reasons for right and wrong with which [Sidgwick] bewildered' him some years previously.

Morley, John (1838–1923) 1st Viscount Morley of Blackburn, politician

Letter from Rt. Hon. John Morley to Henry Sidgwick

Declares that he had hoped to be first to come to the M[etaphysical?] the previous night, where he and Sidgwick 'might have snatched a moment...to settle the point raised in [Sidgwick's] note' of nine days previously. Failing an interview, has decided to write regarding the matter. States that he has read Sidgwick's piece 'pretty carefully', and thinks that the general public, in consideration of his 'effective and interesting treatment of the questions between Leslie and Lowe, will allow themselves to be tempted into the severer matter of the definitions.' Believes his piece to be suited to the readers of the Fortnightly Review, and will give to students of economics a subject to reflect upon. Suggests that the short paper 'What is Money?' should be published as the 'next instalment'. Refers to the fact that Leslie might wish to reply to Sidgwick's paper. Reports that he has spoken to the [Rector] about the [Athenaeum] Club, and is awaiting his reply. States that he admires 'the Virgil' much, and observes that 'Myers seems...to have true literary faculty, as [Symonds] has, or Church', and asks why he does not produce more.

Morley, John (1838–1923) 1st Viscount Morley of Blackburn, politician

Letter from Rt. Hon. John Morley to Henry Sidgwick, with enclosed cheque

Letter, 4 Feb 1879, referring to the enclosed 'modest cheque' which is 'to be expended in egoistic or other form of Hedonism.' Reports that Leslie 'is to rejoin in the merry month of May.'

Cheque [148/2] for eighteen pounds, to be paid to Sidgwick, signed by Chapman Hall, 3 Feb 1879.

Morley, John (1838–1923) 1st Viscount Morley of Blackburn, politician

Letter from Rt. Hon. John Morley to Henry Sidgwick

Had hoped to accept Sidgwick's invitation for the following Sunday, but reports that he cannot come. Believes that Sidgwick's paper 'will be welcome.' Warns him that he had taken out some references to Sidgwick's address in Leslie's article, and therefore that HS should 'steer clear of too direct a controversy with a man [Leslie] who is as touchy as a medieval grammarian.' Mentions the fact that Sidgwick will soon be 'in town'. [Incomplete]

Morley, John (1838–1923) 1st Viscount Morley of Blackburn, politician

Letter from Rt. Hon. John Morley to Henry Sidgwick

Expresses regret that he cannot insert a short article of three or four pages into the Fortnightly Review. Refers to Sidgwick's claim that he 'can easily make it 13 or 14 pp. instead'. Asks him why he will not, for a change, give him a literary or social article. Mentions that there is a book coming out 'on "England" - in all its aspects', and asks if that would serve him for a text.

Morley, John (1838–1923) 1st Viscount Morley of Blackburn, politician

Letter from Rt. Hon. John Morley to Henry Sidgwick

Refers to a paper from America, which concerns Sidgwick, and which he sends 'in a separate cover' [not included]. States that he shall not print it, but thought that Sidgwick would like to see it. Asks him to send it back to him at his leisure.

Morley, John (1838–1923) 1st Viscount Morley of Blackburn, politician

Letter from Rt. Hon. John Morley to Henry Sidgwick

Reports that he has written to Sidgwick's brother [Arthur?], and expresses the hope that he 'may be able to meet his wishes.' Claims to be ashamed of himself for not writing to Sidgwick as he promised to do, 'about Baudeau, Letr[ .], [ ].' Explains that his failure to do so 'was due to absolute incapacity.' Claims that '[his Life of Richard Cobden?]...is a narrative and a biography...and not a treatise.' Expresses the wish that Sidgwick would write an article on George Eliot for the Fortnightly Review.

Morley, John (1838–1923) 1st Viscount Morley of Blackburn, politician

Letter from Rt. Hon. John Morley to Henry Sidgwick

Informs Sidgwick that his friend Chamberlain 'is thinking of sending his son to Trinity, and asks Sidgwick about the procedure involved. Asks if there has been 'any new light lately on the twin sovereign mysteries of Being and Value'. Regrets that he is too busy to spend a Sunday afternoon with Sidgwick. Hopes that he likes Myers' book, which seems to him 'extremely good in every way.'

Morley, John (1838–1923) 1st Viscount Morley of Blackburn, politician

Letter from Rt. Hon. John Morley to Henry Sidgwick

Claims to acquiesce 'with sorrow, but resignation.' In relation to 'the book', states that it is of no consequence. Finds that Sidgwick's 'spirit of serious inquiry' would stand in the way of a review. Asks when he will be at the Athenaeum Club.

Morley, John (1838–1923) 1st Viscount Morley of Blackburn, politician

Letter from Rt. Hon. John Morley to Henry Sidgwick

Claims to be 'rather struck by the notion of asking Symonds to undertake W.S [William Shakespeare?].', and intends to talk it over with his [publisher? ] one day that week. Thanks Sidgwick for putting so good an idea into his head. Regrets that it seems that 'the chances of a free Sunday are faint.'

Morley, John (1838–1923) 1st Viscount Morley of Blackburn, politician

Letter from Rt. Hon. John Morley to Henry Sidgwick

Reports that having just appointed a chairwoman at Dublin Castle, he now has to 'make a Professor of Greek at Cork.' Asks him what the Cambridge honours in the enclosed list [not included] amount to. Declares that '[a]t the same time you don't need a Porson for an Irish Queen's College.' States that there are 'one or two excellent men standing', but that he would like to appoint a Royal University man 'if decency should not happen to forbid.'

Morley, John (1838–1923) 1st Viscount Morley of Blackburn, politician

Letter from Rt. Hon. John Morley to Henry Sidgwick

Declares that he is confident that any book Sidgwick cares to produce 'ought to exist', and thanks him for giving [Practical Ethics] to him. Explains that he had already bought it, but intends to hand the copy on 'to some worthy recipient'. Hopes to return to Public Morality one day, and intends to borrow elucidation from Sidgwick's 'interesting cases.' Remarks that 'Reason of State does not smell very sweet in France just now'.

Morley, John (1838–1923) 1st Viscount Morley of Blackburn, politician

Letter from John Morley to Nora Sidgwick

States that he ought the previous night in their discussion 'of the disgrace of being [moved] by the [victor], to have recalled the famous saying of [the Marquis of] Vauvenargues that "Great thoughts come from the heart." ' Submits this maxim 'as a subject for reflection', and for further argument the next time they meet.

Morley, John (1838–1923) 1st Viscount Morley of Blackburn, politician