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Thompson, William Hepworth (1810–1886), college head
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Papers of W. H. Thompson

  • THMP*
  • Colección
  • [19th cent.]

This collection contains correspondence, a journal of a tour in Greece in 1856, notebooks on classical subjects and other writings, and printed material primarily relating to his classical studies and lectures as Professor of Greek at the University of Cambridge.

This material forms a series within the additional manuscripts series b, c, and d and are catalogued as Add.MS.b.115-119, Add.MS.c.72-73, Add.MS.c.158-160

Thompson, William Hepworth (1810–1886), college head

William Hepworth Thompson: journal of a tour in Greece, compositions, lecture notes

Travel journal of a tour of Greece dated 15 Apr.-11 June 1856 with rough sketches and geographical and architectural observations, notes on people met, food encountered, weather, and transportation (item 1). Accompanied by Latin and Greek compositions dating from early days with his private tutor Thomas Scott at Gawcott, and then at Trinity College, Cambridge, many of them drafts and fragments, and including compositions for Medal and Fellowship exhibitions, with compositions and verses by others: [John William?] Donaldson, Charles Merivale, E. M. Cope, and John [Smith?] Mansfield. The compositions include one headed "Macaronic verses written a few years ago by Professor Porson, during the alarm of an invasion", and two statistical tables in an unidentified hand, "A Display at one View, of the Number of Books, Chapters, Words and Verses contained in the Old and New Testaments, with other curious information connected with the Sacred Writings", and another listing numbers of people in the world, numbers of places of worship in London, consumption of good in London, inhabitants of England, Scotland, Ireland, and Wales in 1802. With other notes, possibly lecture notes, many of them fragmentary, and an undated letter from Elizabeth di Spineto.

Thompson, William Hepworth (1810–1886), college head

William Hepworth Thompson: a notebook of miscellanea, copies of a lecture on Euripides in 1857, and the printed sale catalogue of his library

Three separate groups of material:

  • An unbound notebook of miscellaneous items, which includes a dialogue between Plato and Paley, with various drawings, parts of poems and complete poems by William Wordsworth and Percy Bysshe Shelley, and a hand-drawn calendar listing plays printed in England in the 16th and 17th centuries.
  • 5 copies of a pamphlet headed “Euripides (A lecture delivered in 1857)” signed W. H. T. at the end in wrappers, including one inscribed to H. Jackson and another to Professor Badham, with Thompson's corrections, and another with a note on the front indicating that it was to be revised and submitted to the Journal of Philology, with 13 copies of the offprints from that journal, vol. XI
  • Catalogue of the valuable library of the Rev. W. H. Thompson, D.D., deceased…which will be sold by auction, by Messrs. Sotheby, Wilkinson & Hodge…on the 23rd of May, 1887 & the three days following. London, [1887]. With annotations throughout by an unidentified person.

Thompson, William Hepworth (1810–1886), college head

William Hepworth Thompson: printed material

Two printed sermons by Thompson: "Old things and new." A sermon, preached in the chapel of Trinity College, on Wednesday, December 15, 1852, being Commemoration Day; and A sermon preached in Ely Cathedral on Sunday, November 14, 1858, being the Sunday next after the funeral of the Very Reverend George Peacock (2 copies).
Five offprints from The Journal of Philology: "On the Word κρουνχυτροληραîος in the Equites of Aristophanes v. 89" and "Platonica" (3 copies) from Vol. V; "Introductory remarks on the Philebus", from Vol. XI; "Babriana" (13 copies) and "On the Nubes of Aristophanes" (12 copies) from Vol. XII.
Accompanied by an MS poem by D. D. H. [Douglas Denon Heath?], written in 1832[?], with note 'returned to D. D. H. 23 June 90' [possibly originally with verses by others in Add.MS.c.158, as described in a folder listing there in William Aldis Wright's hand].

Thompson, William Hepworth (1810–1886), college head

Letter from W.H. Thompson to Henry Sidgwick, with notes on a passage from Plato's Republic

Letter (158/1) referring to the 'enclosed contributions' [158/2] to Sidgwick's paper as meagre, but as being representative of what he had found time to read and think about during the summer. Believes that the passage in Plato's Republic must stand, and states that the true ruler 'ought to know enough of the true statecraft to govern without the consent of mutinous inferiors.' Dicusses the difference between statecraft and statesmanship. Hopes that Sidgwick will have enough papers printed for Thompson to have half a dozen.

158/2: transcription of a passage from Plato's Republic relating to a steersman and his crew. Refers to notes made some years before, which discuss the passage in terms of its literal and grammatical content. Refers to 'Mr S.'s' [Sidgwick's?] view on the passage.

Thompson, William Hepworth (1810–1886), college head

Letter from W. H. Thompson to Henry Sidgwick

Refers to Sidgwick's letter in the previous night's edition of the Pall Mall Gazette, and regrets that Sidgwick was annoyed by a passage in his letter in the Saturday Review. Explains that he was provoked by the form of the article to which his letter refers, and wrote the letter, of which he sends Sidgwick the original [not included]. Wishes to show that he had no intention of insinuating that Sidgwick was 'one of those who held no form of Christianity to be tenable.' Discusses the relation of reason to Scripture, and states that he has identified Sidgwick with those who think the Roman catholic religion synonymous with Church of England[ism]. Refers to the word 'Quixotic' in the Saturday Review, and to the 'obnoxious article'. Explains that he now regrets that he erased a paragraph from the proof, and believes that if Sidgwick had read it he might not have taken the same view of his letter. Claims that he only wished to show 'that there was no "cynicism" in thinking that [Sidgwick] and others might have retained [their] fellowships with [their] present views'.

Thompson, William Hepworth (1810–1886), college head

Letter from W.H. Thompson to Henry Sidgwick

Understands that Sidgwick 'can give some account of the Lady alluded to in the enclosed epistola [ ]' [not included]. States that even if she is possessed of the '"[ ]" powers she professes, it seems doubtful whether she ought to be openly encouraged by inmates of [their] House.' Has no doubt that Sidgwick will give him 'a candid statement of the case' as it appears to him.

Thompson, William Hepworth (1810–1886), college head

Letter from W.H. Thompson to Henry Sidgwick

Declares that he should be very sorry to throw any obstacle in the way of enquiries 'into the curious phenomena of "Spiritualism"' and predicts that if Sidgwick can prove that there is a scientific truth at the bottom of them, he will have made 'a highly interesting discovery.' Refers to an enclosed letter [not included], which shows 'how great a solidarité there is between resident members of one and the same College. Declares that it would be a pleasure to him if the scene of Sidgwick's experiments could be 'removed to some home in the town occupied by somebody interested in the investigations', and if they were to be presided over by a lady, 'so much the more satisfactory to Mr. G.'

Thompson, William Hepworth (1810–1886), college head

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