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Miscellaneous papers

On the front is stamped ‘ORIGINAL DOCUMENTS & PAPERS.’ The docu-ments are accompanied by folded sheets of blue paper bearing descriptions of the documents, in which they were evidently kept before they were bound.

Sandars, Samuel (1837–1894), librarian and benefactor

Inscriptions from alba amicorum

On the front cover is stamped ‘CL [i.e. 150] Orginal-Handschriften [sic] Welt-Berümter Männer’. Three or four letters have been scraped away after ‘CL’.

The contents of the book are mostly autograph inscriptions on slips, removed from various alba amicorum. Each slip typically contains a moral injunction or other text (most of which have been quoted in the individual descriptions), a complimentary message to the recipient, and the name and titles of the writer. A few are painted with arms or other designs. The slips on ff. 8r, 45r, 53r, 62r, 65r, 76r, 77r, 93r, 97r, 98r, 113r, 124r, and 147r have inscriptions on the front and the back.

In the descriptions of the individual items MS ‘j’ and ‘v’ have been printed ‘i’ and ‘u’ respectively where they represent vowels, and breves (˘) have been disregarded. The Greek characters ȣ and ϛ (stigma) been replaced by ου and στ respectively. The sources of texts have sometimes been indicated, though they are not usually mentioned on the slips themselves. It should be noted that in many cases the texts are adaptations rather than exact quotations.

Some slips share characteristics with others, indicating that they probably have a common origin. The most obvious of these groups are as follows:

(1) Five fairly small slips, all about 9 cm wide, though clearly trimmed, bearing inscriptions dated at Wittenberg in June and November 1593: ff. 28r, 29r, 51r, 87r, and 104r.

(2) Seven small slips of various sizes, all trimmed, bearing painted coats of arms, all undated but probably of the 17th c.: ff. 4r, 13r, 16r, 17r, 112r, 135r, and 146r.

(3) Nine slips, mostly trimmed but probably originally measuring about 9.5 by 15 cm, three of them written on both sides, bearing inscriptions dated as follows:

Leipzig, 25 Oct. 1667 (f. 53r)
Wittenberg, 27 Feb. 1670 (f. 147r)
Wittenberg, 1 Mar. 1670 (f. 93r, reverse)
Wittenberg, 1 Mar. 1670 (f. 26r)

Wittenberg, 1 Mar. 1670 (f. 86r)
Wittenberg, 1 Mar. 1670 (f. 111r)
[Leipzig], 30 Mar. 1670 (f. 99r)
Leipzig, 1 Apr. 1670 (f. 80r)
Leipzig, 7 Apr. 1670 (f. 147r, reverse)

Leipzig, 25 Apr. 1670 (f. 151r)
Leipzig, 28 Apr. 1670 (f. 93r)
Giessen, 15 May 1670 (f. 150r)

Ulm, [1671 x 1674?] (f. 53r, reverse)
These slips probably came from the album of Balthasar Friedrich Saltzmann, to whom those marked with asterisks are addressed.
(4) Thirty-eight slips, mostly measuring about 9.5 by 15 cm, six of them written on both sides, bearing inscriptions dated as follows:
Darmstadt, 22 Mar. 1709 (f. 77r)
Giessen, 3 Apr. 1709 (f. 90r)
Giessen, 3 Apr. 1709 (f. 14r)
Giessen, 3 Apr. 1709 (f. 142r)

Giessen, 5 Apr. 1709 (f. 136r)
Giessen, 7 Apr. 1709 (f. 77r, reverse)
Frankfurt am Main, 13 Apr. 1709 (f. 119r)
Arnstadt, 25 Sept. 1709 (f. 45, reverse)
Arnstadt, 26 Sept. 1709 (f. 107r)
[Leipzig], 6 Dec. 1709 (f. 106r)
Leipzig, 8 Dec. 1709 (f. 115r)
Leipzig, 9 Dec. 1709 (f. 76r)
Leipzig, 10 Dec. 1709 (f. 76r, reverse)

Leipzig, 11 Dec. 1709 (f. 11r)
Jena, 3 Mar. 1710 (f. 95r)
Jena, 20 May 1710 (f. 145r)
Jena, 21 May 1710 (f. 85r)
Jena, 22? May 1710 (f. 44r)
Jena, 22 May 1710 (f. 65r)
Jena, 28 May 1710 (f. 23r)
Jena, 29 May 1710 (f. 36r)
[Jena], May 1710 (f. 8r)
Halle, 4 Oct. 1710 (f. 20r)
Halle, 13 Nov. 1710 (f. 97r)
Halle, Nov. 1710 (f. 5r)
Halle, 22 Mar. 1711 (f. 84r)
Halle, 30 Apr. 1711 (f. 46r)
Halle, 13? May 1711 (f. 97r, reverse)
Leipzig, 13 May 1711 (f. 65r)
Wittenberg, 29 May 1711 (f. 83r)
Wittenberg, May 1711 (f. 42r)
Wittenberg, May 1711 (f. 31r)
Dresden, May 1711 (f. 109r)
Frankfurt an der Oder, 10 June 1711 (f. 32r)
Celle, 25 July 1711 (f. 88r)
Berlin, 29 June 1711 (f. 123r)
Hamburg, 20 Aug. 1711 (f. 8r, reverse)
Bremen, 28 Aug. 1711 (f. 92r)
Franeker, 7 Sept. 1711 (f. 138r)

Franeker, 7 Sept. 1711 (f. 62r, reverse)
Amsterdam, 12 Oct. 1711 (f. 39r)
Leiden, 17 Oct. 1711 (f. 62r)
The Hague, 21 Oct. 1711 (f. 96r)*
[Weimar], [1702 x 1725] (f. 45r)

Each of these slips is numbered in the top right-hand corner on one side, but there is no obvious pattern to the numbering. The slips probably came from the album of Elias Silberrad, to whom those marked with asterisks are addressed.

It may also be noted that there are two inscriptions dated at Lützelstein in 1618 (ff. 49r and 69r), two at Giessen in 1653 (ff. 43r and 56r), two at Jena on 10 April 1654 (ff. 30r and 101r), two at Leiden in 1713 (ff. 3r and 102r), seven at Halle in April 1717 (ff. 47r, 67r, 70r, 122r, 124r, 131r, and 148r), three at Halle in October 1740 (ff. 10r, 81r, 98r), and three at Jena in July 1741 (ff. 57r, 63r, and 68r).

Poem by [Sir Robert Cotton?]

Poem starting "One faire par-royall, hath our [is]land bred", with "R.C. 1596" at bottom, accompanied by a later transcript starting "One fair pair-royal hath our island bred / Whereof one is alive and two are dead - / Sydney the prince of prose and sweet conceit, Spenser of number and heroic rhyme - / ... Camden thou livst alone of all the three ...."

Cotton, Sir Robert Bruce (1571–1631) 1st baronet, antiquary and politician

"Historia de Alexandro el Magno"

Possibly a translation from Quintus Curtius Rufus, by an unidentified author. Note on the front free endpaper states that it contains a part of the 6th book, with the 7th through 10th books complete.

Notebook containing phrases from Ovid's Metamorphoses, Latin and Greek verse and notes, and notes on rhetoric

Phrases taken from Ovid (Metamorphoses); Latin verse; Greek verse; Latin prose text [perhaps relating to the Acts of St Andrew?]; more Latin verse; notes on [?] Roman law, mentioning Tiberius Gracchus. Notebook also used from other end in: Latin verse, beginning with a phrase taken from Ovid's Ars Amatoria, 'Militiae species amor est' then diverging; further Latin phrases with English equivalents; Latin notes on rhetoric, including on Cicero.

Notebook containing extracts from Seneca, Terence, Livy etc, with printed pages from Ovid's Metamorphoses

Extracts from Seneca (Hippolytus) and Terence (in secretary hand), Greek verse, and extract from Livy (in an italic hand). Printed text of Ovid Metamorphoses (Book XV, lines 596-834) bound in at end of volume. Before these printed pages, and written from front to back: Greek and Latin notes: extract from an idyll by Theocritus; Latin text, 'Quam tenua est puerorum natura...'; another Latin text, 'Natura sigillas fuit...'; couplets in Greek.

Notebook containing Greek vocabulary, phrases from Cicero's De Oratore, notes in Latin and English on religious subjects etc

Rough, 'pen-testing' marks on first pages, including the signatures of Adam Whitfield and Francis Gregory. List of Greek vocabulary with Latin translation. Phrases from Cicero's *De Oratore" with English translation. Notes on the Resurrection in Latin. Notes on the Crred and canonization in Latin. Latin verse couplets.

Notebook also used from other end in: Latin orations, on headed 'Ad doct. Stroud' [possible William Strode, Canon of Christ Church, Oxford); English sermon on a text from John's Gospel (notes in Latin interspersed).

Notebook with Latin notes, calendar for 1641-1642, phrases from Virgil and English notes for a sermon

Rough, 'pen-testing' marks on first pages, including the signatures of John Saunders, Francis Gregory ('Franciscus Gregory, huius libri possessor') and David Whitford; Latin note, scribbled out but probably a curse on thieves ('qui rapis... libellum' visible); Latin note on Psalm 109; Latin prose passage on the 'Academia', which may mention Christ Church, Oxford ('Aedes Christi'... 'Oxonium'); calendar for Mar 1641-Feb 1642 (few entries, but 24 Mar is marked 'electio'); Latin phrases from Virgil's Aeneid with English translation; numbered Latin quotations, many couplets, including from Juvenal; English notes on Psalm 118.2 [for a sermon?].
Notebook also used from other end inwards; pages much damaged by mould here but it is possible to see: rough pen scribbles, including 'Wheitford' [sic] and a monagram 'HB'; page beginning 'man that is borne of a wo[man...' Book of Job] then continuing with Latin notes on 'Philippus' [of Macedon?], Amphipolis and Thermopylae, etc; Latin prose notes, possibly on a religious subject; Latin verse; Latin notes about the angel Gabriel.

History of Charles IX, Books I and II, by Antoine Varillas

This volume contains the text of the first two Books of Varillas’s Histoire de Charles IX. This work, which comprised ten Books in all, was first published in two volumes in 1683, though it had previously circulated in MS. On the spine is written ‘Charles. 9. Liure 1. et 2’.

Varillas, Antoine (1624–1696), French historian

‘The Glasse of Righteousnes’: an English translation of Den Spegel der Gherechticheit, by Hendrik Niclaes

See the table of contents below. On the spine is stamped ‘The Glasse of Righteousness by H. Nichol of the family of Love. M.S.S. Anno M. D. LXXX.’

—————

Contents

f. i r: Title: ‘The Glasse of Righteousnes. (Speculum Justitiae) Through the holy Spirit of the Love of Jesus Christ and the deified Man, out of the Heavenly truth witnessed and published. To a declareing the Headsumme of the Upright Righteousnes or Kingly crowne of the Everlasting life. And is by HN perused anew and playnely or Distinctly declared. Translated out of Base-almayne. … ANNO. M. D. LXXX.’

f. 1v: Print of a symbolic representation of the Last Judgement, headed, in Low German, ‘Nu geit idt Gerichte ŏuer de Werlt: nu wert de Fŏrste desser Werlt vth-geworpen. Joan. 12.’ (John xii. 31). [1590 x 1630.]
The illustration depicts, in the words of the British Museum catalogue, ‘an angel hovering above two large orbs; a devil and skeleton standing on the right orb as it is swallowed by a hell mouth [with a lamb in front]; at left the same orb upturned, crush-ing the devil, the lamb with the flag of the resurrection standing on top of the fallen skeleton’. The angel carries a label inscribed ‘Nu is idt Heil de Kraft, vnde idt Ryck vnserem Gode geworden vnde de Macht Synem Christo Apoc 12’ (Rev. xii. 10). The lambs are each labelled ‘De Wech de Waerheit vnde idt Leuen’ (‘The Way, the Truth, and the Life’); the devils are each labelled ‘Sunde’ (‘Sin’).
Cf. British Museum No. 1870,0514.311.

f. 5r: ‘The First Booke. of the Glasse of Righteousnes.’
At the foot of the page is the date 1578.

f. 77r: Print of a symbolic representation of God in Heaven, 1656.
Engraved by Richard Gaywood. The print depicts a sun with the tetragrammaton in the centre, surrounded by clouds and a heavenly host. At the head is the text ‘Ego primus et ego novissimus: alpha et omega Is. 44.48. Ap.1.21.22’, and round the sun is ‘Coronae assimilabo judicium meum. 4.Esd.5.’ This is an elaboration of the device which appears on the title-page of several of Niclaes’s books, e.g. The Prophetie of the Spirit of Love (1574).

f. 78r: ‘The Second Booke of the Glasse of Righteousnes.’

f. 201r: ‘The Third Booke of the Glasse of Righteousnes.’

f. 295r: ‘The Tree of Life | The Fourth Booke of the Glasse of Righteousnes.’

f. 403r: Print of a heart and other emblems, captioned with verses beginning ‘Our Heart is the Minde of God’, [17th c.].
Two hands clasped in greeting in front of a lily, within a heart surrounded by rays of light, clouds, and winged heads. Above the hands are the words ‘Love trueth’, and amidst the clouds are the tetragrammaton and the word ‘Emmanuel’. Below the illustration are the following verses: ‘Our Heart is the Minde of God most high. Our Beeing amiable, as the sweet Lillie. Our faitfullnes Love and Trueth upright, Is Gods Light. life, and Cleernes bright.’

Letter from Isaac Barrow to the Fellows of Trinity College, Cambridge

Pera, Constant[ino]politanae - After an apology for the long delay in writing to the Fellowship, he gives an account of his travels from Paris, with a description of his stay in Florence, prolonged because of the plague in Naples, which was predicted to spread to Rome whither he had planned to go next; heeding the warning that if caught by the plague he would not be able to leave, and it proving too difficult to reach Venice, he embarks on a ship to Constantinople. He describes the present state of affairs under the Grand Vizier, Koprulu Mehmed Pasha, who had come to power two years earlier: his work to restore the Ottoman name at home and abroad, recovering the islands of Tenedos and Lemnos, repelling an attack by the Venetian fleet, suppressing a revolt in Moldavia and Wallachia by removing their princes, repressing the infighting threatening the prestige of the empire, most recently undertaking an expedition to Transylvania on the pretext that Prince Ragotzy, a Turkish subject, had invaded Poland hoping to take the kingdom for himself. Barrow predicts that Christendom will find in the Grand Vizier its worst enemy and describes his punishment of Parthenius, the Patriarch of the Greek Church, who was accused of intrigue with the Duke of Muscovy despite the commonly held view that the accusations were false, and who was hanged and left on display in his Pontifical robes as a deterrent to plotters. Barrow closes with a promise to return to Cambridge within the year.

Docketed by William Derham, "Paper. 1. Dr Barrows Lr ...to the Fellows of Trin. Col. Cambridge from Constantinople. Caland August 1658. Publ. Lr 1. W.Ds.'

Barrow, Isaac (1630–1677), mathematician and theologian

‘Verbum Sapienti’, by Sir William Petty

(‘In Petty's list of his own writings … the entry “Verbum Sapienti, and the value of People” stands opposite the year 1665, and the internal evidence makes it probable that the booklet was written in the latter part of that year.’ (The Economic Writings of Sir William Petty, ed. C. H. Hull (1899), vol. i.))

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