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Fry, Helen (1864-1937) artist
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Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

c/o R. W. Reynolds, 2 Hare Court, Temple, E.C. - Returns Trevelyan's poems; he has been unable to write a 'proper criticism', though he makes a few comments about the "Orpheus", which he very much likes, and the "Elegiacs", where there are some lines which give the same feeling as Poynters and Alma Tadenas - 'sham classical pictures'. Will reread the "Epimetheus" then send it on. Fry and his wife are going to try and get the Berners Street flat; Trevelyan must say if it doesn't suit him. They think he will be able to have both a bed room and sitting room. The initials are getting on very well.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivyholt, Dorking. - Is glad Trevelyan is back: will be working on the Colchester lecture until the 18th so invites him to visit then. The Albert Hall ones are finished and went well. He and Helen have not yet found Trevelyan a house, though the one they looked at [see 4/20] is still free; the wine has not arrived yet. Asks how Trevelyan's play "Cecilia" ["Cecilia Gonzaga"] is getting on. Helen and Goldie [Dickinson] are 'offensively & increasingly Daily Telegraphic together'.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivyholt. - Apologises for the delay in writing: Helen wanted to address a poem to Trevelyan about his flowers though Fry has warned her Melodie Dolmetsch [sic: Elodie, Arnold Dolmetsch's second wife] had no success that way. Thinks they will not visit till the end of the month. Is reading Balzac. His portrait of the 'O.B.' [Oscar Browning] got very like but he has made him 'a little sanctimonious': thinks he will be able to put this right, but doubts whether he is good at likeness or character. The proofs [of his book on Giovanni Bellini] have gone; mocks himself for his Gallicisms. Offers to talk to White regarding the disagreement over Trevelyan's taking a lease on a house: thinks it would be best to insist the lease is terminable in case of building. Doodle of Pegasus. A line in Helen Fry's hand should introduce a poem, but nothing follows: incomplete letter?

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Ivy Holt, Dorking. - Is writing to Trevelyan instead of working on his lectures on the Byzantines. Has just read [Stephen] Philips "P&F" ["Paolo and Francesca"] and shares Trevelyan's conclusions: it is very English and there is no real poetry in it. Trevelyan, Binyon and Moore are far superior, but it is Philips whom the critics praise. Has had an irritating letter from Mrs Grandmont. Yes, Moretto was a Brescian. Describes the Frys' journey back from Italy. Has been to Westcott and thinks the house will do very well: will get to work with the friezes soon. Helen says they will be delighted to have Amica [Elizabeth van der Hoeven] any time in February; hopes he will have some time free from lecturing to show her around Dorking. His arch at the New English [Art Club] looks 'abominable'. Hopes Trevelyan and Berenson will sort things out. Sends love to Ravello.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Madeira Cottage, Lyme Regis. - Still more or less an invalid and can write while Helen is taking walks with Margery and the nurse. Helen is certainly in a better and more stable condition. The masque [for the opening of the new library at Somerville College, see 4/55] would be put on in June so he supposes Trevelyan will not be able to manage it, but it would be a pity. They want a mythological subject, the Triumph of Athene over Aphrodite and Juno, and Margery could send details. Asks where the Trevelyans are planning to go abroad. Stresses that he does like Bertie's article [Russell's "Free Man's Worship"].

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Does not know why Trevelyan has not received the enclosed [now missing: an invitation for Fry's exhibition at the Alpine Club?]: Trevelyan's father says he cannot come but has the dates wrong. Is fascinated by [Forster's] "The Longest Journey": reminds him more of Gorky than anything else. Logan [Pearsall Smith], however, 'kicks at it'. Is going to Perugia tomorrow for the Exhibition ["Mostra di antica arte umbra"]. Helen is much better. Does not think they will manage the Tovey concerts this time. A postscript notes that [William John?] Evelyn will not agree to the necessary improvements, so the Frys are still househunting.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

L.B.S.C.R [London, Brighton and South Coast Railway?]. - Apologises for not writing: has been very tired and Helen 'in the difficult exalted mood'. Is going to Paris for two days, 'museuming' with a Trustee [of the Metropolitan Museum of Art]. Is sorry not to have seen Trevelyan; hopes Helen's phase will pass soon as it is 'far more trying than the depression'. Asks to see Trevelyan's "Sisyphus". The Frys have taken a house at Guildford for nine months, then hopes their own will be built. Hopes Paul is well again.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Chantry Dene, Guildford. - Possible arrangements for meeting after a trip to Paris [for the Metropolitan Museum of Art]. Goldie [Dickinson] wants to visit: asks if Trevelyan can send him a wire; suggests bringing Logan [Pearsall Smith] over on Tuesday so Fry can show them the new house. Thinks Trevelyan will like it: the neighbourhood regard it as 'the most hideous thing ever produced'. Will try to go to some of the concerts. Has been with Helen at Bourton-on-the-Water and has left her there; Mr Bowhay still has hope, but she 'still despises the whole world... if once that could be overcome she would be almost completely well.'

Letter from Roger Fry to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Hampstead. - The rain on Sunday made it too uninviting to bicycle on Sunday: they stayed in the shelter of Shulbrede Priory and rode back some of the way this morning. He had written to Helen about Paul [Trevelyan]; the letter from her, originally enclosed, is a response. Would be good if Bessie could write a little note about Paul and other 'domesticities', but the doctor does not want her to have much strain from correspondence; the doctor seems to think she is getting on slowly. They enjoyed their stay with Bessie and saw some good sights on the way to Petersfield, including Bedales where he hopes Paul will go one day with Julian and Pamela. Is going to Failand to see his children soon.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Roger Fry

Pensione Palumbo, Ravello, prov. di Salerno. - Explains how the rumour of Fry's death [see also 4/46 and 4/47] spread: it originated from [William] Sharp who told the Grandmonts at Taormina that he had seen an obituary; they then wrote to Helen [Fry], and to Bessie who wired to the Enticknaps who replied this morning that the Frys were both well, and only then told Trevelyan. Hopes the obituary was not that of Fry's brother, cousin [Lewis George Fry] the painter or any other near relation. Has finished the first act of his new play, on a mediaeval theme. His "Cecilia Gonzaga" is coming out in a month or two. Johnson has been bothering him over the £10 Trevelyan would not pay [for printing “Polyphemus and Other Poems”], claiming it is Fry's fee, which Trevelyan does not think has been paid. Does not want to quarrel with Johnson as he has the remainder of the edition but thinks he is trying to swindle them. Asks whether the Frys have changed houses; also whether he has done anything on their Claude, whether the Bellinis [works by Jacopo Bellini discovered by Fry in Venice which he hoped would be bought by the National Gallery] will come, and about 'the Cosimo and your petition to the Balfours'. News from Ravello about ‘the Kershaw’, Madam Palumbo, Tufti, Francesca and Mrs Reid. Fry’s portrait of ‘Old Pal. [Pasquale Palumbo]’ is much treasured by Madam Palumbo. They are reading [Richardson's] "Clarissa". Going to Palermo in about a month, and hope to see Lina. Berenson is in good humour with Fry; Trevelyan has been correcting some of his proofs.

Letter from Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson to R. C. Trevelyan

Roundhurst. - Roger [Fry] is leaving for London towards the end of the month; asks if he himself can stay on for a while and ask a friend [name illegible] to join him, as he is fond of the place and of Augustus (though 'the poor child has got hooping-cough'). Roger 'keeps up', but collapses when he goes to town. No change in Helen's condition. Is getting on with his dialogues, and reading "Sidonia" [Meinhold's "Sidonia von Borke: die Klosterhexe" or "Sidonia the Sorceress"] and wonders why Trevelyan thinks so much of it. Visited the Tennysons recently; remarks on what a 'fat lethargic domestic chief' [Hallam Tennyson] is. 'Kittie' Bathurst is there: asks if Trevelyan knows her. Dickinson and Lord Tennyson played cricket against the boys and were well beaten. Asks to be remembered to Berenson. Has been seeing something of the 'Friday's Hill' people [the Pearsall Smiths].

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson

The Shiffolds, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking. - Greatly admires Dickinson's dialogue ["A Modern Symposium"], which he praises at length. Thinks his sympathies were most with Martin, Ellis, Woodman and Vivian, and of course Coryat, in whom he seems to recognise something of himself. Bessie has not yet read it, but is just about to. They hope Dickinson is still coming to visit on the 25th or the weekend after that, then they are going abroad. Roger and Helen [Fry] are coming this Sunday.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Hotel Timeo, Taormina:- The Frys have been here a week now, and Robert will stay ‘a little longer’ than he had intended, though he hopes to start back ‘some time next week’. Most of the time the weather has been ‘very fine’; in fact, ‘rather too dry’. Today they are going, in the boat of ‘the Cacciolas’ fisherman’, to see ‘the grottoes under the cliffs, which are very wonderful, something like the Capri grottoes’. They will then spend the rest of the day on ‘the Cacciolas’ island [Isola Bella] which contains everything, from rabbits and a ruined chapel to corals and Leonardo “Madonna of the rocks” sort of places’. Roger Fry is painting ‘a picture of the theatre and Aetna’, but Robert does not think ‘the place inspires him much for painting, though they both enjoy staying here very much’. They ‘looked in at an Italian carnival dance yesterday evening’; the Frys ‘danced a polka’ and Robert watched.

There is ‘great indignation here about the bombardment of the Greeks [in the conflict with the Ottomans over Crete]’; expects there also is in London, as ‘Public feeling seems to be entirely with the Greeks in England, France, and here [Italy]’. Sees Colonel Hay is the new ambassador [of the US in London?]. Will try and get Il Capello del Prete [by Emilio De Marchi] for her on the way back. Is not yet certain about coming down [to Welcombe] for the ‘Shakespearean week’, so she should not get him tickets; would most like to see As You Like It. Does not think [Frank] Benson ‘would do the Tempest very well’: his Midsummer Night’s Dream was ‘not altogether good’. Is glad Fairweather is ‘strong again’. Supposes his mother will be in London when he returns. Will go to Haslemere and ‘get settled there as soon as [he] can’; thinks the Russells are there now. Hopes his father is ‘still well’.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Pension Palumbo, Ravello:- Has little to say, as life is ‘quite uneventful’. They [he and the Frys] usually have the place entirely to themselves. Visited Mrs Reid’s garden the other day: it is ‘not so fine and big as the Cacciolas’, but has some nice trees’, and he will go to sit there occasionally. Mrs Reid has said he can go whenever he likes, though she herself is too ill to be called on at the moment. Believes the ‘present Lacaita [Charles Carmichael Lacaita]’ is her nephew. There are ‘many other places’ he can go, ‘especially a garden at the top of the cliff’.

The Frys ‘usually spend their day in their studio’; Roger has just had ‘rather a bad cold’, but Robert thinks Helen ‘is all right’. They ‘read Don Quixote aloud in the evenings, having first read ‘the beginning half of [The Casting Away of] Mrs Lecks & Mrs Aleshine [F. R. Stockton]’ which they found here. Robert has done a lot of work since coming here; there has been good weather, except for ‘three wet days last week’.

Has received her letter, and the bills: it was quite right of her to open those. His letters have now begun to ‘come direct’. Is glad his father is ‘keeping well’, but wishes ‘he would not go back [to London?] too soon’. Does not yet know when he will go to Florence, but does not think it will be for some time; expects he will not stay there long. He and the Frys may visit Naples soon; does not know how long George will be there, but expects he will have left by the time they go.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Sir George Trevelyan

I Tatti, Settignano, Florence. - He and Bessie are just starting for Ravello, and will arrive tomorrow evening. The last few days' weather has been 'perfect', and they have had a 'very pleasant time with the Berensons'. They do not see much of Florence, since the house is some miles outside, but 'go in sometimes in the morning', and they see 'a good deal of amusing people, English, American, or Italian', who live in or near Florence. One day a 'future Henry James would find an excellent subject in a life of Berenson, after the memoirs of Story's life [a reference to James' William Wetmore Story and His Friends].

Has recently been reading Butler's Way of All Flesh, which might interest his father; perhaps it is 'rather depressing reading', but the 'satire on clergymen etc... is at times masterly. Butler was apt to be perverse and cranky', which comes out in the book, but it is 'very sincere' and has for Robert 'the fascination of a pyschologist's autobiography' as he imagines the book is 'autobiographical to a great extent', though expects 'the incidents... are mostly invented'.

Their [new] house seems to be getting on well; plans are now being made for the stables, which will be 'quite small'. Wonders whether his father's farmers 'will get a visit from the Tyneside wolf'; does not 'quite understand where his haunts are', but he supposes nearer Hexham than his father's lands. He and Bessie are both well, and looking forward to Ravello; mentions the sighting of a wolf by a friend walking in the mountains near there, which 'made off as fast as it could'. The few wolves left 'never seem to do any harm, at least they don't attack people'.

Asks his father to tell his mother that he took Fry's drawing of him to Hampstead, and that Fry 'will see what can be done for it. Mrs Fry seems very well again now'. The other day they went to see Mrs Ross, who 'sang some Tuscan songs on her guitar, with great vivacity and still with a good deal of voice left'. She always asks after his father. He and Bessie 'find her amusing, and rather like her, in spite of her being rather coarse and often very absurd'. They both send love, also to C[harles] and M[olly] if they are still at Wallington.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

The Shiffolds. - Has been away, or would have answered her note with his father's questions earlier. Cannot find a reference to 'levying an indemnity' in Murray or elsewhere; '"requisitio"' is used as a substantive in that sense, but may be general a word', as is probably the case also for 'fine' and 'tribute'; both 'ne'er do weel' and 'ne'er do well' seem to be 'used as nouns by quite good writers, such as Dickens'.

Paul 'seems quite well again now', though last week he was not so well; Bessie also seems well: she went with Robert to the Speyers' last Sunday, where Hausmann, Frau Soldat, and and Leonard Borwick were staying 'so there was a lot of music' and several pieces were rehearsed for next Wednesday's London concert.

Is glad Phil [Morgan Philips Price] is now recovering; Bessie has had 'a nice letter from Aunt Meg'. Has not had much news about the Frys recently, as Roger has been in Italy for the last three weeks; expects he will soon return. Imagines Helen 'is much the same, perhaps rather better in some ways', though 'doubt[s] whether there is any real improvement'. Robert's play [Sisyphus: An Operatic Fable] should be out this week, though he has not yet heard anything about it.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

Ma Retraite, Ede. - Addresses Trevelyan as 'my dear Bob'; is very glad to hear from him; was just last week that she left Amsterdam and he went with Paul [Hubrecht?] 'to visit Volendam and buy Dutch cheeses' but it seems a long time ago. Paul wrote a 'rather amusing & ironical account of that day'. He must have had a bad crossing as the weather has been 'most depressing ever since'; 'poor Grandmont is shivering & probably longing to get away', but the coming of Bob's friends the [Roger] Frys will keep them longer. Will miss them very much; Bramine has 'proven to be such a friend', she has told her everything and she is 'a great help'. All her family 'have a somewhat inquisitive if not suspicious turn of mind' and have begun to have suspicions about her and Bob; not in an unkind sense but they want to know 'exactly what happened or did not happen'. Her uncle, aunt, and [cousin] Marie stayed with her sister [Abrahamina Röntgen] in Amsterdam; is sure they compared notes. Bramine is a help to 'appease their minds'; would also help if Trevelyan wrote a 'collins' to her aunt which will make it 'all look more natural'. She and Bob must continue to be quite 'sincere and truthful' with each other, and 'everything will come right in the end'; scolds him a little for leaving the house without saying goodbye to her uncle or Grandmont, though her family found his absent-midnedness comical.

Is writing in the drawing room, hearing the 'continual tinkle tinkle of the piano' as Grandmont practises some Haydn trios. They spent at the evening recently at the house of the painter [Willem?] Witsen, where Bramine works at her etching every day; played some music and even persuaded Witsen to join them with his cello, though he is 'terribly shy and modest' he plays very well. Has been practising hard herself recently, as she wants to be in good shape if she goes to have lessons from the new teacher in Amsterdam who has replaced her old teacher [Joseph] Cramer. Asks how Bob's new house is getting on; asks its name and address, and when he will move in. He will miss the Frys at first; hopes they like the Dutch cheese, and that it will not be 'like the story of the cheese in [Jerome's] "Three Men in a Boat"'. Is reading Joachim's biography [by Andreas Moser], and has given up the Brownings' letters for a while. 'Correspondence is unsatisfactory in so many ways'; wishes she could see more of Bob, though she tells him not to 'interpret this for more than [she means] it'; tells him to write as often and fully as he can. Will try to puzzle over his 'metaphysical quotation', though doubts she will understand it entirely without further explanation; wonders about the value of such questions, though she does greatly admire 'the philosophical turn of mind' as long as it does not hamper any other enquiry. Bramine sends kind regards to Bob; she and Grandmont apparently always speak of him 'by that disrespectful name', so she supposes she may also. Notes in a postscript that he did not tell her how old he is; guesses twenty-seven.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague; addressed to Bob at The Mill-House, Westcott, Dorking, Surrey. - They seem to be in similar circumstances this week: she has been helping to clean her uncle [Paul François Hubrecht]'s big bookcases; the charwoman who helped her 'was amusing enough' and made some 'delightfully naïve remarks' about the books. Elizabeth sometime lends books for her or her boys to read. Last Monday they moved to the Hague; the three summers they have spent at Ede seem to have passed very quickly, thinks they were 'the happiest & most interesting' parts of her life so far so she has become attached to the place and 'even to the ugly house' and is sad to think of the new 'unsympathetic' owner changing it, though he can do little to the woods and moors. Is going to spend a few days at Almelo with an old married friend whom she has not seen for some time; she is very musical and her husband seems to be a good pianist; also Marie [Hubrecht's] American friend Maud Howard is coming to stay tomorrow and she is 'not over anxious to see much of her'. Marie is then going to spend the winter in Florence though, like Maud Howard, she is a little vague about her plans.

Has changed her mind about 'forcing circumstances' and now thinks it would be good to see Bob again; suggests he comes over to the Hague next month, on the pretext of doing some work such as a translation of [Joost van] Vondel with which she could help, to make it seem less strange to her uncle and aunt; would have to ask him to stay at a hotel unless her uncle invites him to stay, and knows all this will give him trouble. He must write and tell her sincerely what he thinks. She has discussed the plan with Bramine [Hubrecht] who reassured her there was nothing wrong with it. Gives the address of her friend at Almelo, Mrs Salomonson Asser.

Has just seen a portrait of Bob's father 'on an old Financial Reform Almanack'; remarks on his 'charming eyes'. Hopes Bob is enjoying himself bringing 'dry bones' to live. Asks if he went to the concerts [given by Julius Engelbert Röntgen and Johannes Messchaert] and appreciated the singer. Is reading the Brownings' letters again, which are charming but get terribly sentimental. The [Second Boer] war is indeed horrible; asks if there are reasonable views on its duration and 'what the end can be'; asks whether there are as many 'contradictory muddling telegrams' in British newspapers as in Dutch ones; glad that there are 'so many rightly thinking English', but they are still a minority. The Grandmonts are at Florence, but unfortunately will have left by the time the Frys arrive. Very kind of Trevelyan to transcribe some of his verses for her; looks forward to reading them though she says she is a 'highly unpoetical being'. Signs herself 'Bessie'.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague; addressed to Bob at Pension Palumbo, Ravello, preso d'Amalfi, Italia. - Was glad to get Bob's two letters and hear he had arrived safely at Milan. Forwarded some letters to Ravello on Sunday which Bob's mother had sent her, with 'a very kind note' [originally enclosed]; Bob is a 'naughty son' not to give her his Ravello address in time, and she will send it to her tomorrow. Thinks she would like Bob's mother to call her Elizabeth, as she asks; her English friends do, and then she will reserve 'Bessie' for 'more intimate purposes'. Also encloses a letter from [Alphonse] Grandmont which might entertain him, as might 'the bad poem in the beginning'. Is glad Dr [Empedocle?] Gaglio is being so helpful; shows he 'has regained his common sense' after quarrelling with Mademoiselle Thomley and getting 'away from under her influence', now he is 'much with the Dahlerups'. Hopes this letter will greet Bob on his arrival at Ravello, and that he enjoys 'all the good, beautiful things of life' there and gets some good work done. Asks if he remembered to give his letter to Mrs [Helen] Fry, and to buy himself some 'foreign paper' and a razor strop. If not she will have to think of him as 'a shaggy Robinson Crusoe-like poet' writing 'poems and love-letters on odd ends of paper... used by the peasants to wrap up their fruit'; has been enjoying seeing her own paper sent back 'bedabbled' with Bob's dear but 'very untidy and cook-like writing'. Had her photograph taken this morning; it happened so quickly that she did not have time to think 'what kind of simpering smile' would suit her best; will send Bob one. People keep asking to see Bob's photograph and are surprised when she does not have one.

Jeanne Salomonson stayed till Sunday morning. On Friday night Bessie's aunt [Maria Pruys van der Hoeven]'s two sisters [Alida and Agatha] came to visit with a girl who is living with them for a while, 'a most horribly uninteresting dull & unartistic kind of being' who yet had the 'pretence of being very musical'. playing the piano abominably but trying 'the most difficult & beautiful things'; felt 'rubbed up the wrong way' when she went to bed, 'horribly sarcastic & terribly sour'. Mr Kattendijke came on Saturday to accompany Jeanne and they did some 'wonderful Brahms songs'; on Sunday they went to a piano recital by Harold Bauer which was partly quite good, but at the end he played 'such horrid firework things' that it nearly spoilt everything else and made him think less of him. Has had a nice letter from Madame Goriany, the Austrian lady Bob met at Roccabella [Taormina, Sicily]. Is working hard on the translation for Ambro [Hubrecht] about 'the absorption of fatty matter into the intestine'. Their cousins, the van Deldens, and their daughter are coming tonight; soon they are going south and then perhaps to the Dutch colonies. Has written to Tonina [van Riemsdijk]'s mother about the violin, and is curious to know the answer.

Continues the letter next day: is going to spend the day in Leiden, first calling on a 'dear cousin' [Louise Hubrecht] who has known her since childhood and lunching with Jeanne [Salomonson Asser] at her mother's. Ambro [Ambrosius Hubrecht] appeared suddenly at dinner; an enormous whale was stranded on the coast two days ago, and he has secured it for his university [Utrecht]; she has been able to give back her translation as the usual man is well again; he says he has sent his 'American speech' to Ravello. A pity the Frys cannot visit [on the way back from Italy]; hopes to see them soon.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague; addressed to Bob at Pension Palumbo, Ravello, preso d'Amalfi, Italia. - Seems Bob may be staying longer in Milan; is sorry for the Frys as Roger Fry is suffering from a bald cold. Has received a parcel from Bob's mother with photographs of his parents and brothers and is very glad to have them. Is glad Bob is enjoying himself at Milan and seeing many beautiful things; curious he has never been before; she remembers the "Cenacolo" [Leonardo's "Last Supper"] 'above all others', and many beautiful things at the Brera, though she and Bramine [Hubrecht] were there during a thunderstorm when it was very dark; looks forward to going again. Bob must not be 'too anxious' about her: she has got over her initial misery at their parting and now he is 'haunting [her] only pleasantly', as he says; she could not be made miserable by thoughts of him as she loves him too much; also trusts him completely.

Returns to the letter in the evening; has been out in the rain to see the dentist and 'arrange a torture hour with him', though less needs to be done than she feared; tonight is Ambro [Ambrosius Hubrecht]'s third lecture, and Paul [his son] has come to see the whale [see 8/14] and will probably go to the lecture on her ticket. Her aunt [Maria Pruys van der Hoeven] has had a letter from Bramine, with an 'enthusiastic account' of how they [the Grandmonts?] are looking after the eye patients [at Taormina] and how helpful Dr [Empedocle?] Gaglio is now. Returns the next day to scold Bob for saying that 'modern art scarcely seems to exist' in Italy; says this is too sweeping a statement and fears 'Fry's dogmas' have been influencing him after all; hopes he will always 'be as inclusive as possible'. Went to Ambro's lecture after all; Paul stayed at home and worked, and this morning has gone to keep an eye on the work of cutting off the fat and baring the skeleton of the whale; he sends many greetings to Bob. The Frys' name for her sounds 'very splendid indeed' and is certainly better than 'Amoretta' which reminds her of 'amourette', a pet hate of hers; she would still like him to call her Bessie or Bess. Very good of him to send her a ring; she will always wear it on the fourth finger of her left hand; a shame he will not be able to put it on her finger and he will have to wear it somehow first.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, the Hague; addressed to Bob at the Mill House, Westcott, Dorking, Surrey. - Thanks Bob for sending "The Speaker" with her letter; likes his poem though does not feel she entirely understands it. Her uncle has taken her aunt out in a carriage for some fresh air and she feels much better for it. Spent Sunday in Amsterdam with the Röntgens who were all well and cheerful; called on [Bram] Eldering in the afternoon and arranged to have lessons once a fortnight; he seems to be 'full of fun & humour'. Yesterday went to see Louise [Hubrecht] and had a very good conversation with her; Louise thinks Maria van Hoeven should go to Ems or Wiesbaden for a few weeks for her health with a nurse, while her husband stayed at home with Bessie to look after him; afraid that her uncle and aunt will take a lot of persuading. Is writing to Bramine today to tell her their plan to marry at Whitsuntide and see if she can come. Mien [Abrahamina Röntgen] is working some beautiful sheets and pillowcases, with embroidery and her own lace, to give them as a wedding present. Bessie is also practising the viola which they brought from Leiden so she can accompany the Brahms songs with Mr Kattendijke; today he sent an etching of a Dutch landscape as a wedding present. Hopes to be able to go to Ambro [Hubrecht]'s lecture tomorrow, then on Monday there is a Röntgen and Messchaert concert, though since Messchaert is at Wiesbaden and not yet well this might be cancelled. There is a Vondel exhibition at Amsterdam; wishes that they could go together. Asks how the Frys are. Has had a kind letter from Bob's mother, also a note from Dorothy Fletcher saying they were sorry to have missed Bob and Bessie's call.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinse[gracht], the Hague; addressed to Bob at The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking, Surrey. - Hopes Bob enjoys his week in Cornwall; asks if Crompton [Llewelyn] Davies is going too. Is very sorry to hear about Mrs [Helen] Fry's illness; even a slight attack of pleurisy is serious, and it shows how weak she is, at least about the lungs; the amount she smokes cannot be good for her. Thinks the measurements of the box for music [see 9/42] are quite right; asks if the partitions could be taken out to give more room. Will write to thank George and Charles [Trevelyan]. Went to Ambro [Hubrecht]'s lecture about the evolution of the eye last night, 'interesting but hard to follow'. Will talk to her uncle this evening about the wedding since the answer from [Thomas?] Barclay, the Paris lawyer, has come at last; it seems the consul must be present; has had 'another wretched discussion' with her uncle about whether the consul should be invited to the wedding breakfast, which she does not want; her aunt has now talked her uncle round in secret. Has been reading an article in the "Revue de Paris" on 'Flaubert et l'Afrique'.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, Hague; addressed to Bob at Penmenner House, The Lizard, Cornwall and forwarded to him at 3 Hare Court, Inner Temple, London. - Will study the patterns Bob has sent her and send them to London, with her choice for his 'nuptial trousers' and travelling suit. Will speak again to her uncle about Bob's objections to writing himself to the consul [Henry Turing]. Entreats Bob for Sir Henry House and his wife not to be invited to the wedding breakfast: her uncle and aunt, who will send out the invitations, do not know the Howards at all so it does not matter that they are 'very distant relations', while their presence would give 'a different ton to the whole business' and make her miserable. It is also likely that Grandmont and Bramine would not come if the Howards were invited, due to their objection to 'jingos'. Does not see it as necessary to invite the Howards, unless Bob's parents wish it especially. Sometimes wishes they could marry 'quietly without anyone near', though knows it could be a lovely day with happy memories; wishes people could 'take it easier'. Returns to the letter after a walk with her aunt, who agrees with her about having to give up part of her musical interests after marriage; understand what Bob means, and thinks she may have expressed herself too strongly in her first letter [9/45], which is the 'wretched side of correspondence'; will wait until she sees him to discuss it. Sees what Bob means about Mrs [Helen] Fry's cigarette smoking; cannot quite feel as he does yet; knows she does have 'a great and natural tendency to rectilineal & rather exclusive argumentation'; hopes she can 'suspend judgment' as Bob says. Does not know enough about German literature to comment on what he says about German literature, but emphasises the advantage, 'which the English nation as a whole is slow & rare in acknowledging' of being able to talk to foreigners in their own language; as an example, it was a real shame that Bob and [Julius Engelbert] Röntgen were unable to converse properly; this is why she was so disappointed when he once refused to learn as 'it seemed such an insular British way of looking at it'. Ordered the book [Stevenson's "The Suicide Club"] for Jan [Hubrecht] and he was very pleased. Mr Kattendijke and Mr Loudon are coming to make music this afternoon. Lula [Julius Röntgen] is recovering from his severe illness. Joachim is going to play with his quartet in Amsterdam next Saturday, and Mien has got her a ticket; will stay with Mrs Guye [or Guije], Gredel's mother; would love to go to the supper party the Röntgens are having for Joachim after the concert but expects Mien has too many guests to invite her. Is glad not to see Bob with his beard, and hopes he never decides to grow one. Asks who Jacobi is, and for Bob to tell him what 'the Cambridge Moore [i.e. George] thinks of his play.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking - Begins the letter on his first night at the Mill House, an 'event of some importance'; describes the 'confusion' in the house, with most of his books still packed in their cases; has just undone two parcels of books from the Bohn library, a recent bargain purchase: sixty Bohns for seven pounds; puns on Ezekiel 37 and the 'valley of dry bones', though the books are not really too dry, and there are translations of Pushkin's tales and Hoffmann's "Serapion" which are quite new to him. Is going for a long walk of exploration this afternoon; hopes to reach the top of Leith Hill; must go and call on the [Paget?] Bowmans some day. Had an excellent game at Harrow last Thursday, just beating the School; [rugby] football is his 'chief... vanity'; they then forgot their injuries 'over the Headmaster's champagne', and he saw many old friends. A couple of days later, saw his greatest school-friend, just back from three years in India as a civil servant, 'a bit fat, but otherwise... not changed much'; does not believe 'nice people' do change much, at least until they 'begin to get senile'. George Moore believes most people 'soon begin to deteriorate', but he is a pessimist. Promises to send her some of his poetry next time. A pity the house at Doorn came to nothing; sympathises with Grandmont's exasperation at a wasted trip around the country. Has written to thank Paul [Hubrecht], who need not have returned his umbrella. Thinks he will get on well with his German when he begins in earnest. Thanks for the information from Grandmont about "Eulenspiegel", which he will share with Langley when they next meet. McTaggart is certainly 'a very interesting and original being, and perhaps the wittiest in Cambridge", though Bob does not think his philosophy sound; has not yet seen his Daisy. Understands her difficulty in talking with the Frys about their 'common friend, that wretched poet', but Fry said nice things about them all and Bessie in particular. Sorry to think of her 'wandering sadly round the country, like Jephthah's daughter' saying goodbye to all the places she knew; will try and write again soon since she is unhappy. Had no chance to show Bramine's sketches to his mother but will do this later; the war is a 'beastly business' but he is glad that 'more sensible people' than he at first though consider that it could have been avoided.

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