Showing 17 results

Archival description
Maxwell, William (1873-1957) Managing Director of R. & R. Clark Ltd, printers
Print preview View:

Letter from William Maxwell to Lady Frazer

R. & R. Clark Limited, Brandon Street, Edinburgh - Is glad she has recovered from her severe illness and that he didn't know of it at the time; has been very ill himself, two operations since the end of February, and another is scheduled to be done by Sir David Wilkie the next day.

Letter from G. A. Macmillan to Lady Frazer

Hotel Flora, Roma - Apologises that [William] Maxwell bothered them, there has been no problem with the book [the 'Fasti'], the commentary is passed for the press and they are waiting for the paper, is delighted Frazer doesn't want to review the proofs of the index, asks if he needs to see the pages of the text and translation which he has twice reworked; is getting some illustrations from the Director of the British School at Rome, Mr Arthur Smith, and the Assistant Director of the German Institute.

Typed letter from William Maxwell to Lady Frazer

Brandon Street, Edinburgh - Clears up a misunderstanding about the preparation of the 'Fasti': refers to instructions from Sir James not to print any of the Commentary until he had finished revising the text of the translation; is glad to know Books V and VI are coming shortly; defends himself against her accusation of 'severity' on her 'interference', points out 'interference' is her term not his; illustrations need to be approved with their legends by Sir James before they can print them.

Copy letter from T. E. Page to Sir James Frazer

Loeb Classical Library. Dated May 16 1923 - Has estimated the text and translation of the Ovid Fasti, and asks Frazer to keep the notes simple so that the volumes don't go over 550 pp., has been in touch with [William] Maxwell, and encloses his reply [not present]; wishes he may take up the Tusculan Disputations of Cicero at some point.

Letter from William Maxwell to Lady Frazer

Brandon Square, Edinburgh - Thanks her for the Downie biography; takes pride in his rise from boy to the head of the business, but is more pleased to have known so many distinguished people including Sir James; is impressed that blindness has not slowed him down; his heart bleeds for France.

Letter from T. E. Page to Sir James Frazer

Loeb Classical Library - Has estimated the text and translation of the Ovid Fasti, and asks Frazer to keep the notes simple so that the volumes don't go over 550 pp., has been in touch with [William] Maxwell, and encloses his reply [not present]; wishes he may take up the Tusculan Disputations of Cicero at some point.

Robert Ackerman research photocopies of Sir James George Frazer letters

Xerox photocopies of over 240 letters, many of them of originals housed in other institutions. The letters are written by Frazer to multiple recipients with a few exceptions: eight are written by Lilly Frazer (to Miss Buckley, Sir Edmund Gosse, Bronisław Malinowski, and W. H. D. Rouse); one is from Henry Jackson to Frazer and five more are from others to others (two from Macmillan & Co. to Hermann Diels, one from Sir Francis Galton to Sir Clements Markham forwarding a letter from Frazer, one unrelated letter from John Sampson to Francis Jenkinson, and one memo from Otto Stapf to Sir David Prain). Five letters include covering letters from the institutions providing the copies. In addition, there are copies of a typescript draft of Frazer's article 'Our Debt to France', the draft of an address on the founding of the Frazer lectureships, and a translation of an article.

Recipients, with the number of letters present if more than five: Aksel Andersson, Terence Armstrong, Spencer Baird, Andrew Bennett, Arthur Bigge (Lord Stamfordham), Miss Buckley (of the Loeb Classical Library), Sir Ernest Budge, John Bullbrook, Francis Burkitt, Edward Clodd, Francis Cornford (16 letters), Otto Crusius, Sir Edwin Deller (6 letters), Hermann Diels (10 letters), Samson Eitrem, S. J. Evis, Jesse Fewkes, Douglas Freshfield, Sir Francis Galton (14 letters), Ernest Gardner, Charles-Marie Garnier (6 letters), Sir Edmund Gosse (42 letters), A. C. Haddon, Sir William Hardy (6 letters), Carl Lehmann-Haupt, C. W. Hobley, A. W. Howitt (7 letters), Mary Howitt, Henry Jackson, Francis Jenkinson (8 letters), Oskar Kallas, Sir Arthur Keith, William F. J. Knight, John Mackay, Bronisław Malinowski (9 letters), William Maxwell, A. G. W. Murray, G. G. A. Murray, Sir John Myres, Theodor Nöldeke, Karl Pearson, Sir David Prain (8 letters), Edward Rapson, A. G. Ross, Sir William Rothenstein, W. H. D. Rouse, Gustave Rudler, Charles Edward Sayle, Solomon Schechter (7 letters), Douglas Sladen, William Thalbitzer, Sir J. J. Thomson (21 letters), Sir D'Arcy Thompson, Hermann Usener, Sir Emery Walker, and Alfred Rayney Waller (6 letters).

Ackerman, Robert (b 1935), biographer

Letter from William Maxwell to Sir James Frazer

Euston Hotel, London - Is writing belatedly to avoid 'the flood', congratulates Frazer, and notes that he knows 'a number of Knights & a few Barons etc. but you are the only O.M. I know personally so I treasure you as a new possession, an addition to my belt of scalps!'