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Trevelyan, Janet Penrose (1879-1956) author
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Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

23 West Road, Cambridge. - Glad to hear about Bessie's 'two companions', both of whom she will need; he can manage to care for Janet with the help of one nurse, as she 'can still read but not walk'. Very glad about the 'Bickbeck RCT library. Nothing could be better'. His book ["A Layman's Love of Letters"] is out next week; will send her a copy. Ralph V[aughan] Williams will be coming to Cambridge frequently in February because of the rehearsals of his "Pilgrim's Progress", which is to be put on at the Guildhall.

Letter from Charles Humphry Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Gazeley. Trumpington, Cambridge. - Sorry to have taken so long to answer Bessie's letters, but is 'snowed under with scholarship examining'. No reviews [of R. C. Trevelyan's "Selected Poems" yet as far as he knows. Encloses two letters he has had from Ralph Wedgwood and the Provost [of King's College Cambridge, Sir John Sheppard] which he would like back eventually. Hopes to hear from [James] MacGibbon this week how the book has been selling.

Letter from Charles Humphry Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Gazeley. Trumpington, Cambridge. - Would have been good to have the publishers listed with the titles [of R. C. Trevelyan's books in the forthcoming "Selected Poems", but is afraid he did not think of it.; sure Bessie need not worry about having her two copies charged to the royalties account; next time, as she says, she can get them through a bookseller. His family are all well, as is his mother.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

23 West Road, Cambridge. - Desmond [MacCarthy]'s death is a 'terrible loss to his friends', and to the 'reading public whom he advised so well'; it is much to be regretted that he cannot now 'write that Introduction to the selection of Bob's work'; fears only he could have written it 'to perfection'. Took George Moore and his wife to Desmond's private funeral here; Ralph and Iris [Wedgwood] also came as well as his relations. Only person he is not sorry for is 'Desmond himself'; 'not much privilege' for the old to 'drag on in the present age' and he suffered so much from the asthma 'he endured so bravely'. Janet is much the same, but cannot get about; he leaves her as little as possible. Thanks Bessie for the offer of a book from Bob's library; he does not have a particular one he would like so she should choose one for him.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

23 West Road, Cambridge. - Sorry to hear that Bessie has been ill again; Janet 'keeps much the same from day to day'. Interested and pleased by the letter Bessie quoted from her German friend; has instructed Longmans to send a copy of his "Autobiography and other essays" to Bessie for her. Glad Humphry and Molly are going to see her.

Letter from Janet Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

23, West Road, Cambridge. - Thanks Bessie for her letter; they will indeed 'all miss our beloved Will [Arnold-Forster], who was 'so much to us in our younger days'. His portrait of her hangs in the dining room here with an artificial light over it; they 'could not make much of it' in the [Trinity Master's] Lodge as the lighting was difficult, but now it is back in its proper place. She and George are 'happily back in this house'; hopes they will stay here 'forever' now; the Lodge was 'impossible' once she became 'so feeble in walking'. The Adrians have not yet moved in, since there are 'such huge repairs to be done' on the electric wiring and structural deficiencies; is 'thankful to be out of it'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Hallington Hall, Newcastle- on-Tyne. - Thanks Bessie for her letter; has written to [Herbert Mayow] Adams, the Trinity Librarian, asking him to communicate with her, though he may be on holiday and thus not able to write at once. Very glad Humphry is going to act as [Bob's] unofficial literary executor; is sure he will do it well. Sorry that Bessie's arthritis has been causing her pain; Janet has no pain but is 'dreadfully incapacitated'. Would much like 'the "homely" photo of Bob'. They do not come south until 16 October.

Letter from Dorothy Moore to Elizabeth Trevelyan

86 Chesterton Road, Cambridge. - The doctor came yesterday and was pleased with George: it is not a coronary thrombosis, as feared, but just a 'tired heart-muscle' and he will soon recover. George has been up since breakfast and won't go to bed until after dinner; he is not to go to Trinity on Thursday for the presentation of a silver inkstand and Sheffield tray with silver tea service to the Master and Mrs Trevelyan [on G. M. Trevelyan's retirement as Master of Trinity], but will sign the address which the Vice-Master will bring round tomorrow. Has been very busy herself: her father was here for a month and needed much attention, so it is probable she did not keep an eye on George. There has also been the excitement of the O.M. [Order of Merit] which thrilled her father, although the boys have taken it casually; there have been lots of letters of congratulation, and people coming round for tea. George is looking forward to seeing Bessie when he goes to Leith Hill Place next month.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

The Stella Maris Nursing Home, Trumpington Road, Cambridge. - Bessie will have heard from Catherine [Abercrombie] that Dr Noble thinks he should go for a few weeks into a nursing home to 'rest and be overhauled'. Is no worse, and in fact thinks he is 'definitely better', and he 'quite enjoyed the [Apostles'] dinner', but the doctor examined him 'very carefully' and thinks he needs the rest. Dr Noble is a 'nice quiet sensible man'; Bob thinks Dr Holloway and Dr Bluth would approve of him. Is very sorry to miss the St Matthew Passion and all the Busch [Quartet] concerts. It will not be long before they are 'both at home again together'. Janet seems 'remarkably well and cheerful'. Has to stop as he has several letters to write; hopes Bessie's cure is going well.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Has not written for a few days, but has not had much news; all 'pretty well in spite of the cold'; hopes Bessie has been able to continue her 'short walks'. Went to Leith Hill Place yesterday and had a 'delightful talk' with [Leslie] Hotson, the 'scholar who has so many documents about Shakespeare and Marlow and their contemporaries'; used to know him in the Quakers Mission in France during the First World War, and he was also an old friend of Lascelles and Catherine [Abercrombie]. The Times Lit[erary] Supplement is sending him a book of translations from Greek poetry by F. L. Lucas for review ["Greek Poetry for Everyman"]; 'sure to be interesting', and much of it probably good; will keep him occupied for 'some time'. Thinks he has told Bessie about the dinner the [Apostles'] Society are giving in honour of him, George and Desmond [MacCarthy]; they have promised not to make Bob give a speech, so he can enjoy his dinner. May be his last visit to [George and Janet] at the Lodge [since George's time as Master of Trinity is nearly over]. Will see Humphry and G.E. M[oore]. Hopes to visit Bessie again soon when it is 'not quite so cold'. Wrote to Bertie [Russell] recently. Asks to be remembered to K.T. B[luth] and Theo.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington. - Went to Hallington yesterday for tea; afraid Janet was 'no better, in fact noticeably less well' than when he saw her last, though she tried to be cheerful; she was 'very nervouse [sic] with her hands in a way that was new, and told me the same thing over again'. Clough Williams Ellis was 'very agreeable' and cheered George up a little, he also got Charles to talk; sorry he has gone this morning. The house is not noisy, considering there are 'three or four children in it at present'. Hopes all well at the Shiffolds; asks when the Bluths are coming and whether they are still at Cambridge. No reading aloud here at the moment, so he and Catherine [Abercrombie] sometimes read "Pride and Prejudice". Charles is 'much more affable than he used to be'. It is the Cambo Exhibition, which may involve 'a lot of tiring standing about'. Very glad Ada is at the Shiffolds. Hopes Bessie could make out [Gaetano] Salvemini's address; she should ring up Alys Russell, who will know it, if not; he knows it is 'Miss Massie', but not her initials so cannot look her up.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington. - Bessie will have got his postcard saying they [he and Catherine Abercrombie] had a good journey; they are now 'having a pleasant time' despite bad weather. Going to Hallington this afternoon. Clough Williams Ellis and his wife came yesterday; they are both 'good company'; there are 'no other grown ups' except Gillian Trevelyan, with her baby. She is 'quite nice, and gets on with everybody'. The children are sometimes noisy, but there are not many of them. The Deed of Conveyance came this morning, which he will sign and send back to Down, Scott and Down today or tomorrow. Will be good to see [Gaetano] Salvemini again; thinks Thursday 31st will be a good day to do so. Glad Ada is with Bessie, and 'in better health'; sends his love to her. Will write tomorrow after seeing George and Janet [at Hallington]. Charles is 'cheerful'; they have played chess, and Bob won. Catherine has not suffered from the journey, but feels the cold; they have a fire all day in the library. Is quite well, 'in spite of tickles [from eczema]'.

Letter from Janet Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

The Master's Lodge, Trinity College, Cambridge. - Glad to have Bessie's letter, despite the 'rather serious news': sure Bob must hate being ill, but the letter has a 'happy ending' and she hopes he 'is able to enjoy life' again. Also thanks Bessie for sympathy about 'dear little Aunt Gertrude', a 'very important member' of the family whom all the younger members used to consult about 'any knotty points' and was always very hospitable to her and Dorothy. Adds that every family should have that sort of aunt. Asks to be kept informed about Bob's progress: she and George are 'both so fond of him'. Notes in a postscript that she is 'now very disabled with [her] arterial disease': cannot walk, has bad eczema, and can hardly write; but she manages to 'keep pretty cheerful'.

Letter from Janet Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

The Master's Lodge, Trinity College, Cambridge. - Thanks for Bessie's sympathy for Dorothy, who will 'not have to move from her present house' unless she wants to; all her 'friends and interests' are also in London now. Wishes too that she and Bessie saw each other more often. Asks if she knows that George has been made Chancellor of Durham University; fortunately this does not involve any duties or residence, but he goes up once a year to confer honorary degrees.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

The Master's Lodge, Trinity College, Cambridge. - Thanks Bob for the [Homeric Hymn to] "Demeter" [Bob's translation in this year's"From the Shiffolds"], which he very much enjoyed, especially as it was new to him. Bob always sends 'these lovely reminders' of himself at Christmas. Janet can now hardly get around alone, due to the 'hardening of her arteries', which destroys her balance; however she 'keeps cheerful' though reduced to a 'lower level of life'. Is going to Hallington for a fortnight; Janet will stay with friends. Asks Bob to let them know if he can visit them next term; they would 'love to see him again'.

Letter from Janet Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

The Master's Lodge, Trinity College, Cambridge. - Thanks Bessie for asking about her health, but with 'this queer and slow disease' it is not easy to answer; an old friend said today that she looks and seems very well, yet she 'still cannot walk above a snail's pace', and George pushes her in a wheelchair around the house. Sorry to hear about the 'serious car accident'; glad that neither Bessie nor Bob were in it. Will keep the details of Bessie's ear specialist, though 'G.M.T. is very naughty about specialists'; she thinks they should try a 'very good man' in Cambridge first. Her sister Dorothy has just spent a fortnight at Poggio with Lina Waterfield; it was difficult financially due to the 'sudden devaluation of the pound' but she 'longed to have' some time there. She can still walk well, and not even Florence tires her too much.

Letter from Umberto Morra di Lavriano to R. C. Trevelyan

Rome. - Hopes Trevelyan has received his previous letter saying that everything is all right about the Deuchars; he just needs to know whether they should be met in Florence by Nicky [Mariano] or whether he should meet them later in Rome. Will be in Venice from Sept 5-7 for the PEN Congress. Is very sorry about Trevelyan's sister-in-law [Janet: news of her chronic illness]; appreciated her 'kindness and good natured intelligence'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

The Master's Lodge, Trinity College, Cambridge. - Thanks Bob for his 'delightful translations' ["Translations from Latin Poetry"]; knew the Catullus originals well and some of the Leopardi, but not the others. The Italian folk songs at the end are 'remarkable'. They are going to Hallington on Friday, a 'tiresome journey for Janet, who gets no better', but they will both be glad to be there. Hopes Bob will visit when he comes north.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

The Master's Lodge, Trinity College, Cambridge. - Thanks Bob for his letter; since he, Bessie, and Desmond MacCarthy all think that George's "Autobiography" was all right and a good length, George feels he has 'managed that rather delicate operation satisfactorily'; Glad Bob likes the rest of the book ["An Autobiography and Other Essays"]. Fears he cannot say that Janet is getting better, though she is no worse; glad that Dr [Karl] Bluth has seen her, who 'quite agreed' with their Dr Simpson about the case.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

The Master's Lodge, Trinity College, Cambridge. - Greatly values Bessie's approval of his autobiography; several of his friends and relations have told him it should be longer, but he notes Bessie's 'literary sense causes [her] to suspend judgement on that point'. Friends and relations are always more interested in 'one's very mild adventures in life' than the general public; has 'said all about [himself that he thinks] the public has a right to know or would wish to know'. Glad they had Dr Bluth to see Janet; not sure whether the tablets he has given will make a 'marked improvement', but it is good to know that 'so great a specialist as he' agrees with their Dr Simpson; they 'both thought highly of each other'. Adds a handwritten postscript to say that his 'admission to shout in the School Choir' was 'by favour (of Sandilands [his head of house]) not by merit!!'.

Letter from Umberto Morra di Lavriano to R. C. Trevelyan

Metelliano. - Is happy to say that he is coming to England for the Executive Committee of the International PEN, taking place between 25-27 April. Is also planning to visit Roger Hinks in Holland. Must see Trevelyan, either in London or at the Shiffolds; is glad he is recovering, did not know he had been low. Saw a notice in the "Times" about [Reginald Popham] Nicholson's death, which must have affected B.B. [Berenson]. Will visit I Tatti just before coming to England. Has seen Raymond Mortimer, but missed [Stephen] Spender and Humphrey Sumner who were in Rome while he was in Paris with the W.F.U.N.A. Is very sorry about Trevelyan's sister in law [Janet: her illness]; would like to write to Trevelyan's brother [George]. Is almost sure to go to Edinburgh for the PEN Congress at the end of August.

Letter from Janet Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

The Master's Lodge, Trinity College, Cambridge. - Is out of the nursing home and 'feeling much more jolly in her own house', getting up every day and walking 'through these enormous rooms'; thinks it will not be long until she is 'completely emancipated'. Felt 'so cross' during her stay in the home as she did not think she needed it, and she got an infection there which meant staying ten days longer. She and George go to Italy in mid-March to stay with Lina Waterfield. Is hoping to take 'a stalwart young don of Girton College' with them to help George on the journey, who will go her own way in Florence. Hopes to stay almost three weeks with Lina, and 'if I don't get well then I don't deserve to'.

Letter from Janet Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

The Master's Lodge, Trinity College, Cambridge. - Thanks Bessie for Olive Heseltine's 'touching little book' ["Lost Content"], which has brought back many memories. Comments on the 'spate of these "Victorian Childhood" books' at the moment; read Molly MacCarthy's ["A Nineteenth Century Childhood"] recently, which is 'very charming.. more humorous than this and therefore lighter'. Olive always had 'rather a genius for unhappiness'. She once helped Janet to run a School Care Committee in Fulham, and she 'became quite good at it' though it was not really the right job for her; wonders what would have been. Janet has 'yielded to the doctors' and will go into the Evelyn Nursing Home in Cambridge on Friday for three weeks rest; did feel 'rather down' last week, as she has been 'winding up her job at the British Institute of Florence' and her arthritis is getting 'slowly worse'. She and Georgewere hoping to go to Florence in March, and to stay at Poggio [with Lina Waterfield], but she fears now that they will not manage. Originally encloses a Christmas card, and hopes Bessie can see it; 'Molly the Great' [Charles's wife?] took it this summer.

Letter from Janet Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

The Master's Lodge, Trinity College, Cambridge. - Thanks Bessie for the 'nice Christmas note' and for promising Olive Heseltine's book ["Lost Content"]; thinks she would love to read it; hopes Olive is happier than when she knew her in the nineteen-twenties, as 'she seemed to have a sort of genius for unhappiness then', perhaps due to bad health. She herself finds her arthritis 'rather disabling; it increases 'slowly but steadily, and doctors are no good'; she is seeing a London doctor who is 'very nice', but will only refer her back to her local doctor and a masseuse and she is 'getting tired of trying to believe in them'. Wants to see her London osteopath, but even he seems to have 'come to the end of his tether' with her.

Notebook with draft of R. C. Trevelyan's translation of Sophocles' "Philoctetes", with letter from G. M. Trevelyan

Letter, 23 Feb 1949, from G. M. Trevelyan, The Master's Lodge, Trinity College, Cambridge. - Is very sorry he will not be able to put Bob up on 1 March: the doctor has said that due to Janet's 'various complications with dentists, etc., on top of her other infirmities' she should not be troubled with house guests for a while. They will of course be able to see Bob, and he hopes they can give him lunch on Wednesday. Sends love to Bessie. Translation by R. C. Trevelyan of Sophocles "Philoctetes" 54-59.

Book contains: part of an essay by R. C. Trevelyan about the self (1-2); thoughts on memory and old age (3); part of dialogue between Thersites and a "Poet", discussing 'rebellious products and portions of your imagination' (4v).

From the other end of the book: translation of "Philoctetes" by Trevelyan up to line 53; loose sheets inserted with translation of the play to line 114.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

The Master's Lodge, Trinity College, Cambridge. - Thanks Bob for sending his 'usual Christmas present "From the Shiffolds"'. Is going up to Hallington for Christmas and New Year tomorrow night, after the Entrance Scholarship Election meetings; Humphry, Molly, and their five children will be there, though not Janet as 'the northern winter is not very good for her'. She has generally 'kept fairly well this term', however. Hopes to have his "Autobiography and other Essays" out in May, and will send Bob a copy; this will probably be the last new book' he ever brings out. Has been re-reading [Frederic] Maitland's "Life [and Letters] of Leslie Stephen"; perhaps the first chapters are 'rather dull', but then he believes it 'one of the very best biographies' in English.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Villa Tatti, Settignano, Firenze. - Still has not heard from Bessie; hope she has got his letter saying that he has a sleeping-car berth for Sunday 20 April. He and Julian will leave Florence the day before and spend the night at Milan as this will be less tiring. Will reach London on Monday and has reserved a room at the National Liberal Club that night. Has had 'quite a pleasant time here, and seen no end of people'; lunched with George and Janet at Lina [Waterfield]'s, then they came to lunch at I Tatti; both seem to be enjoying themselves. Will be 'so glad to be at home' with Bessie again.

Postcard from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Berenson, I Tatti, Settignano, Florence. - Has not heard from Bessie since his arrival in Italy and is beginning to feel anxious. They are having lovely weather. Julian is going to Siena soon. Will probably leave on Saturday 19 and be back in London on Monday 21 April, returning home next day. Has no quite recovered from the journey, and is having a good time. Saw George and Janet yesterday at Lina [Waterfield]'s, and they are coming to lunch today. Sylvia Sprigge came to lunch yesterday, but has now gone back to Rome. Julian is getting on 'very well with everyone'.

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