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Trevelyan, Julian Otto (1910-1988), painter and printmaker
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Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

Thanks Trevelyan for his letter revealing that he, Pearsall Smith, and others had considered nominating Abercrombie for a prize [the Nobel]. Is overwhelmed by the compliment, and is inspired to try poetry again, having previously given up his ambitions in that regard. Delighted to hear the news of Julian's engagement [to Ursula Darwin].

Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

13 Princess Terrace, Balls Road, Birkenhead. - Congratulations on the birth of Trevelyan's son [Julian]. Comments on his own son [David, born 19 Dec 1909], to whom he reads poetry. Will send Trevelyan his new poem, "Mary and the Bramble", when he gets it back from Massingham. Has seen C. P. Scott and hopes to get work on his paper [the "Manchester Guardian"]; is giving up his regular journalism as he can't write poetry at the same time. Intends to move to the country, and asks if Trevelyan knows of any suitable house.

Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

The University, Leeds. - Thanks Trevelyan for returning a book by [? Herbert] Read. On a recent visit to Cambridge to examine the Milton MS at Trinity, he and his wife Catherine met Julian Trevelyan, who took them out to Terence Gray's theatre [the Cambridge Festival Theatre]. In Trinity Library, Abercrombie also discovered a MS play written by Tennyson at the age of 14, "The Devil and the Lady". Has been reading Giussani's edition of Lucretius.

Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

Monk's Walk Cottage, Much Marcle, Dymock, Gloucester. - Is pleased that Trevelyan liked the "Hymn [to Love]", which another friend had criticised, and has sent it to Massingham. Is interested by the resemblance to Persian poetry, of which he knows little (he praises Fitzgerald's "Salaman and Absal"), and should like to see the poets mentioned by Trevelyan, particularly the Hafiz. Keen to know what Persian metres are like, especially after reading Headlam's belief that Aeschylus was indebted to them for some of his choric measures. Discussion of Japanese poetry, with a "Hokku" composed by himself, and of the "Song of Songs". Expresses the belief that this is a collection of songs rather than a continuous poem. His approach to his book reviewing; is a little concerned that Trevelyan has been guided by it to buy books. Discussion of their sons: hopes David might have "music in him".

Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

Gosberton House, Nr. Spalding. - Abercrombie has been lecturing; he has received £100 from the Royal Literary Fund and has a new-found appreciation for "Carnegie and those jockeys". "New Numbers" is coming to an end, as Rupert [Brooke] is fighting (he has just returned from Antwerp), Wilfrid [Gibson] is making more money elsewhere, and he himself isn't writing poetry at the moment. Catherine is doing well after the birth of their third son [Ralph]. Asks if Bessie knows Van Dorn [Willem van Doorn] who has been staying with Wilfrid. Frost and his family are staying at "The Gallows". Asks if Julian knows the Great Northern's Atlantic engines.

Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

The Cottage, Silverdale, Carnforth - Expresses his and his wife's delight at being the dedicatees of Trevelyan's new collection ["The Death of Man"]. Hopes Julian's health improves when his tonsils are out. Is glad the "Moore business" [the obtaining of an allowance from the Civil List for him?] has gone well so far; was sorry not to have heard from Hewlett. Is anxious about the police and "hope[s] they mean business this time": feels that their success or failure will determine the nature of "the revolution". "[T]hat little swine Winston" ought to be "done in".

Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

12 Westbank Rd, Birkenhead (MS correction to "The Gallows" headed notepaper. - Praises Trevelyan's poem "The Death of Man", which has been privately circulated in a small edition. Munitions work is tiring. Asks how Julian gets on with his poetry; the only one of his own family who is at all poetic is Michael, who is fond of rhyme.

Postcard from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

Ryton, Dymock; addressed to The Shiffolds, forwarded c/o Mr Llewellyn Esquire, Underhill, Chyngton Rd, Seaford. - Thinks the dates Trevelyan suggests are suitable, but since Catherine and Gibson arrive on Monday they will discuss it then. David has been badly bitten by a dog, which fortunately was not rabid. Hopes Julian is doing well 'from his change'. They had a good week in Anglesey in September.

Postcard from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

20 Marmion Rd., Sefton Park, Liverpool. - Abercrombie and his brother Pat have been asked to report to the corporation of Stratford upon Avon on possible industrial development. It seems that the Welcombe estate will be involved, and he asks whether Trevelyan's father (or son Julian) would like to express an opinion. The Abercrombies will be at Stratford the following week.

Letter from Bernard Berenson to Elizabeth Trevelyan

I Tatti, Settignano, Florence. - Apologises for not replying sooner to Bessie's last letter, having been too weak to write after flu. The market value of books is poor, so he is afraid she will not be able to meet her 'great expectations' for Bob's books: large edition of Botticelli drawings now an 'encumbrance'. Glad to hear Julian does well; remembers he had a good sense of colour. Also glad his second marriage is a success. Fears he will never see England again.

Letter from Bernard Berenson to Elizabeth Trevelyan

I Tatti, Settignano, Florence. - Thanks for the letter and the anthology of Bob's poetry. A pity that Desmond [MacCarthy] did not live to write about Bob. Has Forster's and Virginia Woolf's last books but has not yet read them: the number of periodicals he must read leaves little time for books. Nicky reads them to him but it is slow going; the current book is Iris Origo's biography of Leopardi. Julian must come and visit next time he is in Italy.

Letter from Bernard Berenson to Elizabeth Trevelyan

I Tatti, Settignano, Florence. - Glad Bessie is in better health and spirits; he himself suffers but this is to be expected at nearly 89. Bessie's friend Mr Rees may visit I Tatti, and Berenson himself will be happy to see him if there and well enough. Molly Nicolson visited recently, before that Cyril Connolly; they are expecting Rosamond Lehmann and Ernest Hemingway. His book on Piero della Francesca will not appear before July.

Letter from Bernard Berenson to Elizabeth Trevelyan

I Tatti, Settignano, Florence. - Agrees that it is difficult to destroy personal letters, though one knows they will interest others either too much or not at all; understands how she clings to those Bob wrote to her. If she comes across letters he himself wrote to Bob, please do send them on. Hopes she is getting on well with her son and his wife.

Letter from Bernard Berenson to Elizabeth Trevelyan

I Tatti, Settignano, Florence. - Has received and praises the speech given by Bessie at the opening of Robert's library [at Bickbeck College, London; also glad to see Forster's speech. It must have been a pleasing and happy occasion. He and Nicky are glad she has good friends in England, and he wishes he could travel and see her again. The 'Julian couple' were charming.

Letter from Robert Gathorne-Hardy to Elizabeth Trevelyan

The Mill House, Stanford Dingley, nr Reading, Berks. - Has written to tell Sir Edward Bridges that he can see the copy of his father's "Testament of Beauty" [a proof copy, with notes by R. C. Trevelyan] when he himself returns from Italy. Can 'almost compete with Julian over his story about the lion': relates a conversation he overhead in a Chelsea pub about an alligator in someone's room. Has not had an invitation to the opening of the library [the R. C. Trevelyan Memorial Library at Birkbeck College, London] but would love to attend.

Letter from Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson to R. C. Trevelyan

Hunny Hill, Brightstone, Isle of Wight. - Enclosing letter from [Rutland] Boughton [2/175], for whom Dickinson is going to lecture at Glastonbury on religion in drama. He is not likely to touch on metre, and Boughton seems interested in this; perhaps Trevelyan can send a version of his translation of the ["Oresteia"] trilogy. Is looking at [Arthur?] Way's translation of Sophocles, which does not seem bad, but for 'over-romanticism'. Glad Bessie was pleased with Bedales [which the Trevelyan's son Julian attended], and that Trevelyan had a nice letter from Ottoline.

The reverse of the letter has two lines of Aeschylus, Agamemnon 406-407, transliterated and scanned with a translation beneath. There is also a draft letter in pencil; this is difficult to read but appeals to be about costs for publication of a book.

Letter from Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Broome House, Didsbury, Manchester. - Their first communication since the peace: Dickinson shares his relief, and 'venture[s]' to wish Bessie a happy new year. The peace seems certain to be 'bad & unjust' since a victory was won, but he hopes Wilson will be able to ensure a foundation for a better international order. Is scathing about LL. G. [Lloyd George]. Hopes 'hard facts' will prevent a 'permanent enslavement of Germany'. Asks if Bob will now come home; it must be interesting to be in Paris at the moment. Hopes Julian likes school.

Letter from Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson to Elizabeth Trevelyan

11 Edwardes Square W.8. - 'Amalgamation' [the forming of the League of Nations Union] has been a great worry, but it is clearly necessary for the LNS [the League of Nations Society, of which Dickinson was a member. The 'other association' [the League of Free Nations Association] knows how to run propaganda campaigns, and he thinks in general their aims are the same; certainly Murray and Wells want the same, even McCurdy. Their literature is bad, and their policy of the 'League now' has been turned down by Wilson and Grey, who is to be the Union's president and said the right thing on almost every point. Hopes Bessie will not be too suspicious about the amalgamation, though he understands her fears. Is still playing the [chess] game with Bob, who seems very happy. Asks if she is staying on at the Shiffolds. Is glad Julian is happy, but fears she will be lonely. Almost dares hope for the end [of the war].

Letter from Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson to Elizabeth Trevelyan

13a Hanover Terrace, Ladbroke Grove W.11. - Enjoyed a recent visit. Hopes she has been able to make up her mind about Bedales: thinks it more likely that Julian will be happy there than at Harrow. A note about typewriting problems. Has read Buxton's book about Russia ["A Russian Village"?] and found it a 'delightful' counter to the usual picture given of that country.

Letter from Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson to Elizabeth Trevelyan

K[ing's] C[ollege] C[ambridge]. - Thought Jelly [d'Arányi] played beautifully, though her tone is very small in a large hall and she looks 'oddly childish and even awkward'. May is unhappy and unwell, and misses Janet very much; his sisters are looking for lodgings. Enjoyed his time with the Trevelyans: glad Julian is 'happy and busy and friendly'. His lecture at St Mary's Hospital only had an audience of five.

Letter from Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson to Elizabeth Trevelyan

7A Stanley Gardens. - Has left the Trevelyan's umbrella with the rug at Horbury Crescent; was surprised to find Miss [Marie?] Busch there. Liked what he saw of the theological students to whom he gave an address yesterday, though he is unsure whether these talks do much good. Pleased to see Bessie and Julian: hopes to see Julian in Cambridge. Asks about [Bob Trevelyan's mother's] will. Ends by quoting a 'maxim of Goethe' in German.

Letter from Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson to Elizabeth Trevelyan

K[ing's] C[ollege] C[ambridge]. - Ironically praises his own typing. Wasn't well when he saw Julian; wonders why he stays in England when the weather is so dreadful. Supposes Bessie will feel Munro's play is 'not a play', though he thinks it is good; certainly it is 'good propaganda'. Is going to Bob's opera ["The Bride of Dionysus"] in April, but otherwise has no firm plans. Roger [Fry] has gone to France. Danille [?] came to Cambridge yesterday and is 'very friendly and nice.'

Letter from Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Is sorry for 'this upset' [probably the last illness of either or both of Robert Trevelyan's parents]. Advice on Julian's application to Cambridge. Morgan [Forster] is no better: he is going to town to have an X-ray today. Enjoyed his afternoon with the Trevelyans; thinks [Gordon?] Bottomley 'most delightful'. Presumes she has told Allen not to call for him tomorrow.

Letter from Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson to Elizabeth Trevelyan

7A Stanley Gardens. - Is very sorry that Julian has failed the entrance examination. Would like him to come to Kings and thinks he would 'get more out of it there than at Trinity'; Trinity is more likely to 'strain a point to admit him' because of the family connection. Bedales 'always bad when it comes to exams'. Would like to visit at Whitsun. Enjoyed a fine concert at the Queen's Hall last night, apart from Strauss's "Tod und Verklärung": calls Strauss 'the prize humbug'.

Letter from E. M. Forster to R. C. Trevelyan

Harnham, Monument Green, Weybridge. - Distressed to hear things did not go well [regarding the birth of the Trevelyans' son, Julian?] and glad they seem to be better again. Is glad that Moore thinks his book good: says that he 'never understand[s] Moore but like[s] him very much', then corrects himself when he realises not G.E. Moore but [Thomas] Sturge Moore is meant. Was at Lady Ottoline's yesterday and saw Fry; his wife is at home and he seems in good spirits. Went to 'the Sicilians' [the production of Sinopoli's "La Zolfara" at the Lyric Theatre?]

Letter from E. M. Forster to R. C. Trevelyan

Thanks Trevelyan for the books; has read some of them on a holiday in Upper Egypt. Liked Joyce ["Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man"?] and Eliot ["Prufrock and Other Observations"?] very much; enjoyed Virginia's story but not Woolf's [""The Mark on the Wall" and "Three Jews", published by the Woolfs as "Two Stories"]; liked Choke-off [a pun on Chekhov?]. He also liked Trevelyan's work: 'not as much as some of your things', but Mrs Borchgrevink enjoyed them. Will send a cheque; if there is really a surplus asks Trevelyan to send some more new books, though nothing by Jules Romains or Norman Douglas as he has read them. Teases him for not recognising 'the Salzerdromes' as a reference to his own "Pterodamozels" [see 3/33] but is glad the play reached him anyway. Wishes he could write himself; has managed nothing but a few articles 'for the worse of the two English papers here'. Says he is annoyed with Allenby for not providing him with work [by winning victories to write about]. Jokes about Bedouins laying eggs. Is glad Julian likes school.

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