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Trevelyan, Julian Otto (1910–1988), painter and printmaker
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Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan and Elizabeth Trevelyan

Bologna. - Notes that letters should be send to 2 Cheyne Gardens, as they will be forwarded. Is thinking of Bob and Bessie, and 'waiting to hear good news' [Bessie is due to give birth]. Will be in Rome soon, which he always enjoys; finds it strange that in Italy he always 'feel[s] a kind of dissatisfaction' until he is there, however much he is enjoying himself elsewhere. Will spend a fortnight in Naples in March, which 'will be an effort'; fortunately he will be able to stay with 'one of the Huxley youths [Julian], a grandson of the [emphasised, i.e. Thomas]', Jan's cousin who is working at the marine biological station there. Huxley is 'a clever fellow and very nice and a good liberal... curious how much one cares about that nowadays'. Janet will let him know [when the baby is born]: is anxious to spare Bob and Bessie trouble so they need not telegraph him or write. in a postscript, sends love to Caroline if she is with them.

Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

13 Princess Terrace, Balls Road, Birkenhead. - Congratulations on the birth of Trevelyan's son [Julian]. Comments on his own son [David, born 19 Dec 1909], to whom he reads poetry. Will send Trevelyan his new poem, "Mary and the Bramble", when he gets it back from Massingham. Has seen C. P. Scott and hopes to get work on his paper [the "Manchester Guardian"]; is giving up his regular journalism as he can't write poetry at the same time. Intends to move to the country, and asks if Trevelyan knows of any suitable house.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - '[M]uch relieved & encouraged by the telegrams this morning'; Molly also sent one from London; sorry for the anxiety Elizabeth has had about Julian; hopes by tomorrow 'the worse may be over'. Sir George is recovering fast; a good sign that he is now feeling hunger again. Robert and Mary have been very kind about writing.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Received Robert and Mary's letters this morning. Will be 'greatly gratified' if the baby's second name is Otto; Julian is 'very nice', especially as Elizabeth likes it. Discusses the 'perhaps unexampled in England' connection between the Trevelyans and the name 'John'; this close connection may be a disadvantage as he trusts the boy will 'one day be a Philips'; though the Philips family do use John, the real family name is Robert; mentions Robert's 'kind grandfather' and great-grandfather, the 'most memorable personage in the family'. Inclines towards Julian; Julian Fane was 'a very ideal personage' of his youth, and he has a 'tenderness for the emperor Julian' though wishes he had been 'cleaner in his personal habits'.

Letter from E. M. Forster to R. C. Trevelyan

Harnham, Monument Green, Weybridge. - Distressed to hear things did not go well [regarding the birth of the Trevelyans' son, Julian?] and glad they seem to be better again. Is glad that Moore thinks his book good: says that he 'never understand[s] Moore but like[s] him very much', then corrects himself when he realises not G.E. Moore but [Thomas] Sturge Moore is meant. Was at Lady Ottoline's yesterday and saw Fry; his wife is at home and he seems in good spirits. Went to 'the Sicilians' [the production of Sinopoli's "La Zolfara" at the Lyric Theatre?]

Letter from Duncan Crookes Tovey to R. C. Trevelyan

Worplesdon. - Asks Trevelyan to forgive his use of pencil, as he cannot write comfortably in ink when on his back. Sympathises with the Trevelyans in their anxiety: hopes 'the little one [Julian Trevelyan] will thrive'. Describes his accident, which was 'strange and sudden': he fell on icy ground when conducting a coffin to the grave, hit his head against a marble monument, was picked up but fell at once having 'severed a great muscle about the knee'. Was able to finish the service and then was helped to the vestry where he 'made the necessary entries' while waiting for the doctor. Getting into the fly to be driven home was 'a rather excruciating business' and he then had a 'night of horrors'; is now recoving very slowly. Don [Donald Tovey] came to visit just after the accident; has not seen or heard from him since, as he is very busy. Supposes the opera ["The Bride of Dionysus"] is 'rather held up for the present'. Asks when the libretto will appear. Thinks that between them Trevelyan and Tovey 'will waken up Europe'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Had a good account of Elizabeth and the baby from Mary in a telephone call last night. She and Sir George look forward to seeing Robert tomorrow, and she will come to visit on Thursday if Elizabeth feels well enough. Reassures Elizabeth about not being able to nurse [breastfeed] the baby; George 'was a bottle baby' and did very well, and she knows Mrs Catt will be very careful. Sir George seems better for the move to London. Janet visited yesterday evening; Caroline hopes to see the children today. The Government 'seem to have extricated themselves from their difficulties for a time'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

G[ran]d Hotel Trinacria, Palermo. - Was fortunate that he received a telegram saying the baby [Julian] had recovered before any letter on the subject; is very sorry that Bessie and Bob had such anxiety, and hopes that all is well now. Arrived here last night, and likes it as much as he hates Naples. is reading [George Meredith's] "Rhoda Fleming" again, and now agrees with Bob about its 'inferiority', and that it is 'melodramatic' and beneath the writer; feels that the 'alleged "illegitimate-son-of-Ld-Lytton element"' which gives 'a necessary spice' to most of Meredith's works here completely takes over. It is 'no use writing or even talking' about politics; hopes 'God will inspire our leaders to retrieve the situation that some insane Devil has induced them to throw away'. Necessary to be loyal, so 'the less said the better'. Can 'imagine Bertie [Russell] talking on the subject of Sir E[dward] Grey!!'. Met a 'very nice Oxford, Balliol Don' at Naples, not A.L. [Arthur Lionel] but J.A. [John Alexander] Smith; George thought him a good philosopher and a 'very good man'. He admired Bertie [Russell], and discussed [Henry] Sidgwick and McTaggart 'excellently and critically. George expects 'there are good things about Oxford': there are 'a few great philosophers' at Cambridge, while at Oxford 'the young men are taught a little philosophy', this is 'perhaps not a bad division of labour'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Reggio Calabria. - Thanks Bob for his letter. As in the past, is 'greatly troubled about the Finns' [regarding Russification and the reduction of autonomy in the Grand Duchy]. Saw [Julio?] Reuter around the time of the [Sir Frederick] Pollock-[John] Westlake circular; they agreed then it would be worse than useless for the '[Arthur] Ponsonby lot' to do more than publishing the Parliamentary [Russian] Committee's pamphlet ["The Crisis in Finland", 1909]. George feels that perhaps now 'we, or one of us, ought to do more'; will turn his attention to this as soon as he gets to town. Of course they 'cannot save the Finns', only Grey [the Foreign Secretary] could make any difference, but he will not. This is 'the worst thing since the 2nd partition of Poland'. Notes in a postscript that he is glad to hear such good news of Julian. Will reach London on the 5th.

Letter from Janet Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

2, Cheyne Gardens, S.W. - George's movements recently have been 'meteoric'; he turned up at Charing Cross last night and they do want to visit; asks if Saturday 19th would work. They plan to ride over on their bicycles, probably from Dorking. Longing to see Bessie's 'darling babe' [Julian] again; hopes by then he is 'well out of these first troubles', and hears he is improving. Asks how Elizabeth is doing. Great 'fun' to have George back; he is 'so well & jolly after a week's walk in Sicily'. They will probably go back to Italy together next week as planned: George has to go for the Calabrian walk, and they are both 'bound to the Hammonds' [John and Barbara]; otherwise she might have preferred to stay and walk 'among Devonshire primrose-woods!' Calls herself a 'Little-Englander'. Says in a postscript that she is enclosing her 'precious letter about Adult Suff[rage]', which Bessie can burn.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Glad to hear Julian has gained so much weight, and that Elizabeth has recovered her strength so quickly. Interesting that Elizabeth's sister and [Julius Engelbert] Röntgen are coming. She and Sir George are leaving this morning 'in truly patriarchal fashion' since the 'Chelsea nursery' [George and Janet's children: Mary, Theodore and Humphry] join them at the station. Is thinking of Paul today: believes they will 'see him in Julian', who will therefore be 'doubly precious'.

Postcard from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Rapallo. - He and Janet are very glad to hear that Julian has put on eight ounces. They are having good weather and walks here by themselves, before 'going on south to join the Hammonds' [John and Barbara]. Thanks Bessie for sending 'Madame Scocco's letter' [sic: Irene Zocco]; fears he will not be able to go to Palermo again; would have called on her last month if he had known she was there.

Letter from Sophie Weisse to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Northlands, Englefield Green, Surrey. - Hopes Donald [Tovey] has let Bessie know he wants to come in the middle of next week; he is in London at the moment. There will be rooms kept ready for him and Bobbie [Trevelyan] in case it is more convenient for Bessie for them to be there. Hopes that the 'Opera will be achieved' ["The Bride of Dionysus"]: they need 'a new beautiful thing so much' and it 'will be good for Donald to get a steady pull of work at it and forget other things'. Hopes Bessie is now well and the baby [Julian Trevelyan] is getting stronger; a child who was almost despaired of at till the end of January is now 'an enormous strong creature'. They enjoyed having Professor and Mrs Röntgen at Northlands very much; they are 'glorious' musicians. Her own plans for the holiday vague, but she will keep Bessie informed; asks her to make Donald walk as it would be 'a real calamity if he got still heavier'.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Sends Robert something from Withers; the affair [of Florence Trevelyan's will] is coming to an end, at least as regards the 'spavined post-horse of Newcastle' [Philipson the lawyer?]. Has been reading the Greek lyric poets in Bergk again; uses Robert's 'eight-paged letter of April 9, 1900' as a marker and refers to it 'constantly', as he does to Henry Jackson's letter in his Plato. Robert and Bessy must be very happy with their son. Wishes spring would come; Caroline will not get properly well until the weather changes. They are stopping at Welcombe until Thursday afternoon; enjoyed their weekend visit from Charles and Mary. Mary is so fond of Elizabeth.

Letter from Sophie Weisse to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Northlands, Englefield Green, Surrey. - Is 'dreadfully troubled' about Donald [Tovey] again: hopes he will not get into the 'habit of thinking that people want to injure him'. He has had a 'very real shock and grievance' [regarding the Classical Concerts Committee] and spent all of last night walking around and talking; is sending some 'brain tonic' which she wants Bessie to give him; thinks with the Trevelyans' 'soothing friendship' and work on Ariadne ["The Bride of Dionysus"] he should recover. She 'quite delighted' in [Julius and Abrahamine] Rontgens' visit. Sends best wishes for 'the little baby' [Julian Trevelyan].

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Glad to get Elizabeth's letter; thinks Julian will prosper even more with warmth and sunshine. She is recovering, though too slowly; hopes to go down to tea as Annie [Price?] is coming to see her. Mary and Pauline entertained her yesterday; wants to have them painted, probably in miniature. Sir George is reading "Mr Polly" [H. G. Wells: "The History of Mr Polly"] aloud to her, which is very amusing; is reading [Samuel Butler's] "Erewhon" himself, which she will return when he finishes it. Would very much like to see Elizabeth if she comes up again; glad she has 'put things right with nurse'. Nice 'to have a little W.L.A. [Women's Liberal Association]'; likes that the work 'brings one into contact with people you cannot reach in any other way'; was never able to do 'charity visiting' and there are 'such nice women in the WLA'. Asks if Elizabeth would like to represent the Upper Wansbeck W.L.A. at the Council meeting on 10 and 11 May; could put her up. Has sent five pounds to the People's Suffrage Society [Federation?] since she 'approve[s] their principles, though... cannot be bound to one plan'. Asks in a postscript whether Elizabeth has a photograph of Julian.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Is recovering well now, and hopes to go to Eastbourne tomorrow, with Sir George joining her on Saturday; will be staying in lodgings at Vernon House. Asks if Elizabeth would like to stay with her for a couple of nights from Wednesday the 10th. Booa [Mary Prestwich] is coming down for a holiday; they then go to Welcombe. Good to think of Julian getting on well. Is busy: 'so difficult to remember everything after having been laid up for so long'. Had a drive in the brougham round the park yesterday. George returns home tonight.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. [but perhaps written at Bournemouth?] - Sorry to hear that Elizabeth's nurse is not well; perhaps some treatment will put her right. Would be delightful if she and Robert could be at Cambo when she says, then come to Caroline and Sir George; they could keep Julian as long as was required if Elizabeth and Robert wanted to pay visits or travel in August; sure Julian should have northern air in hot weather. '[S]hocked and distressed at the King's death'; Elizabeth knows she does not 'care much about royalties', but the King has been 'most important' in the [current constitutional] crisis, has 'always done the right thing' since becoming King and has often 'intervened in a most useful & broad-minded way'; it is a 'real blow for the liberal party'. Sorry Elizabeth had 'such a small meeting' [of her Women's Liberal Association?] but is not surprised; 'extraordinary how apathetic & suspicious they are at first, but interest grows gradually'. Suggests arranging a tea party. Is feeling much better; Sir George comes this morning. Very amused by the photo.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Vernon House, Hartington Place, Eastbourne. - Caroline is at last 'really convalescent' and will stay at Eastbourne for a week; he himself goes to Welcombe tomorrow. Booa [Mary Prestwich] and Pantlin will stay with Caroline. This is a 'spick-and-span watering place', ready for a crowd which has not yet come. Is 'rather overset' by the King's death; reminds him of when he was invited, 'as a sort of typical undergraduate' to dine at Madingley [Hall] on the day of the Prince's coming to Cambridge. Only Sir George, [the Duke of] St Albans, and the Prince 'a pretty, very young boy' were there; Sir George was by some years the oldest, and now is the only survivor. Has had opportunity to observe the new King well; the old King is, politically, 'a terrible loss, with his immense authority and popularity and his tried Liberalism!'. Agrees that much of [Samuel Butler's] "Erewhon" is 'rather pretentious'. Sends love to Elizabeth. Was delighted by the picture of Robert and Julian.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Glad Elizabeth's nurse is better; fears it will be a while until Julian is quite well, and she must follow the doctor's advice; hopes he recommends a move before the hot weather. The seaside would be good if not for 'change of food'; wishes it were not such a long journey north to them, but babies do feel it less than older children. Have had cheerful letters from Charles and Mary on their way to the [Man] Hunt. She and Sir George are quiet next week, though she needs to go to London to see '"my friend Mr Carter"'. Annie [Philips] is coming on the 24th for a week. The Roosevelt party of four are coming from 4 - 6 June; also present will be Charles, Mary, Lord Morley, and George so it will be a full house. Wishes it were over, as it 'will be like a whirlwind' sweeping over them and entails her getting a new black dress. Is not very strong yet. Sends love to Robert and hopes he is getting on well.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Durbins, Guildford. - Fate, 'though not in an unkind way', seems against him getting his expedition; has just had a commission for a ceiling painting for Sir A[ndrew] Noble's place in Scotland [Ardkinglas] and needed to visit; the project will keep him busy for the latter part of June, so he expects only to get away to Munich at the end of May for 'the Mahommedan Exhibition' ["Meisterwerke muhammedanischer Kunst", reviewed by Fry in the "Burlington Magazine" Aug, Sept 1910]. The death of the King [Edward VII] also 'interferes' since [Lionel] Cust is taken up with court duties and the "Burlington [Magazine]" rests almost wholly on Fry. Does not think he can undertake a bicycle tour; will probably return from Munich via Bale [Basel], Troyes, Provins and Paris, spending about six days. Would love it if Bob joined him, say at Bale 'to see the Holbeins', but does not think it wourth his while. Hope [Bob's son] Julian is prospering; might come over on Sunday.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - He and Caroline are also 'sorely exédés [exasperated]' by the way the King's death is treated by the newspapers, in which 'real emotions and sentiments' are 'overlaid and vulgarised by the perfunctory gush of writers who do not care about the matter at all'; like Elizabeth and Robert [see 46/170], wishes to return to the 'truths of life'. Even the comet [Halley's] has been 'made ridiculous'; has seen no mention that it has been growing smaller and more distant since it was 'a terror to the Turks in 1457'. More concerned about Elizabeth's trouble with the nurse, and Julian's progress. He and Caroline have been reading [John Lothrop] Motley's correspondence - the volume published in 1888 and the new one this year - which makes them think of Elizabeth and her family; there is a 'delightful picture' of his house at the Hague which was lent him by the Queen of the Netherlands [Sophie of Wüttemberg] when he was 'going downhill in body and in his diplomatic fortunes'. He himself, if not as good, is at least 'a healthier historian'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Hopes Robert caught the train and returned home in good time; he will have told Elizabeth about the party, which 'went off very pleasantly'. Mr Roosevelt is 'most amusing'; she liked him better than she expected. Sir George very happy and 'thinks it a great success'; she is glad he and Roosevelt got on and are 'now excellent friends'. They were glad to have Robert to help, and she had a good time with him on Sunday. Hopes the nurse Elizabeth has now is 'good & helpful' and that Mrs Catt has gone to rest. They leave Welcombe on Friday and unless the weather is awful will stay at the Ulleswater [sic] Hotel, Patterdale until 15 June before going to Wallington. Elizabeth, Julian and Robert will be welcome whenever they wish to come.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Windermere. - Travelled here yesterday via Birmingham, where they saw 'the beautiful Burne Jones windows [at the Cathedral]'; they will drive on to Ullswater over the Kirkstone Pass. Booa [Mary Prestwich] is very happy and 'got up to Orrest Head' to enjoy the view. Most important is that Elizabeth and Robert do what is best for Julian, and follow the doctor's advice; she and Sir George will be sorry not to see him, but it is a long journey up to Wallington, which is 'far from a doctor'. Does think Elizabeth should get away as soon as she can; Julian can come north later, or go to the sea, as he may need a change later in the summer heat. Hopes Mrs Catt will return recovered and ready to take responsibility when Elizabeth is away. Thinks Elizabeth is doing well to get fourteen people at her meetings [of the Women's Liberal Association?]; asks if she is going to the Council meetings, which she herself is not sorry to miss as she dislikes 'these disputes so much', and whether she sees Mrs [Millicent] Fawcett and Mrs Ward. Mrs Ward 'deserves a good setting down [for her opposition to women's suffrage]; wonders if she minds it. Thinks 'the [Conciliation?] Bill agreed upon was a good one': though adult suffrage is the right thing it is impossible to pass it, so it is good if anything [on a lesser scale] can be arranged; nothing however can be done this year.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Sure Elizabeth's 'outing' will do her good and she will go back 'fresh' to Julian. Mary thinks he is doing well. Hopes Mrs Catt [the nurse] will return 'well & cheerful'. Robert's letter was cheerful; is amused that he has 'been induced to run in a Hunt', even though he says they are 'not so energetic as George's party'; must have been pleasant from the names he mentioned. Hopes Elizabeth found the Waterfields well; asks if she saw the Northbournes, and is not sure whether they have yet come north. Mary is sending her children to Wallington around 13 July and coming herself around the 22nd; Charlie probably will come at the beginning of August. George and Janet will not come till September

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Robert's account of the 'subsidiary hunt' curious; comments on 'what tenacity there is in certain families', with Macaulay's grand-nephew [Robert], Wordsworth's grand-nephew, and he supposes the great grandson of Erasmus Darwin 'chasing each other about the lakes', while this Sunday Lord Coleridge, the poet's great-grand-nephew is staying at Wallington. He is coming to try the 'great murder case' of the paymaster shot on the train between Stannington and Morpeth' [John Nisbet]. Was pleased by Mary's excellent account of Julian; Robert will be glad to see him 'well and bonny'; sends love to Elizabeth, whose interesting letter to Caroline he has just seen. Notes in a postscript that he has just finished the fifth of [Cicero's] Second "Verrines", a 'wonderful oration'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Happy they will see Elizabeth soon; Rounton [Grange, the home of the Bells] will be a good place to break the journey. Annie [Philips] will enjoy Elizabeth's visit. A pleasure to look at Julian's photograph and think that he is now so well; glad Nurse Catt is recovered. Enticknap is to bring Gussie up on 28 July, and will stay in the house while Gussie goes into lodgings; Keith will arrange it when he returns from a week away. The 'young men at the Portico' buy their own food and pay Mrs Davidson to cook and housekeep for them. The 'W.S. [Women's Suffrage] debate was very interesting, but not very satisfactory... it seems rather an "impasse". Postscript saying it is very kind of Elizabeth to offer to play at the part; asks if they can talk it over when she comes.

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