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Trevelyan, Julian Otto (1910-1988), painter and printmaker
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Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

13 Princess Terrace, Balls Road, Birkenhead. - Congratulations on the birth of Trevelyan's son [Julian]. Comments on his own son [David, born 19 Dec 1909], to whom he reads poetry. Will send Trevelyan his new poem, "Mary and the Bramble", when he gets it back from Massingham. Has seen C. P. Scott and hopes to get work on his paper [the "Manchester Guardian"]; is giving up his regular journalism as he can't write poetry at the same time. Intends to move to the country, and asks if Trevelyan knows of any suitable house.

Postcard from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

20 Marmion Rd., Sefton Park, Liverpool. - Abercrombie and his brother Pat have been asked to report to the corporation of Stratford upon Avon on possible industrial development. It seems that the Welcombe estate will be involved, and he asks whether Trevelyan's father (or son Julian) would like to express an opinion. The Abercrombies will be at Stratford the following week.

Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

Thanks Trevelyan for his letter revealing that he, Pearsall Smith, and others had considered nominating Abercrombie for a prize [the Nobel]. Is overwhelmed by the compliment, and is inspired to try poetry again, having previously given up his ambitions in that regard. Delighted to hear the news of Julian's engagement [to Ursula Darwin].

Letter from Bernard Berenson to Elizabeth Trevelyan

I Tatti, Settignano, Florence. - Apologises for not replying sooner to Bessie's last letter, having been too weak to write after flu. The market value of books is poor, so he is afraid she will not be able to meet her 'great expectations' for Bob's books: large edition of Botticelli drawings now an 'encumbrance'. Glad to hear Julian does well; remembers he had a good sense of colour. Also glad his second marriage is a success. Fears he will never see England again.

Letter from Bernard Berenson to Elizabeth Trevelyan

I Tatti, Settignano, Florence. - Thanks for the letter and the anthology of Bob's poetry. A pity that Desmond [MacCarthy] did not live to write about Bob. Has Forster's and Virginia Woolf's last books but has not yet read them: the number of periodicals he must read leaves little time for books. Nicky reads them to him but it is slow going; the current book is Iris Origo's biography of Leopardi. Julian must come and visit next time he is in Italy.

Letter from Bernard Berenson to Elizabeth Trevelyan

I Tatti, Settignano, Florence. - Glad Bessie is in better health and spirits; he himself suffers but this is to be expected at nearly 89. Bessie's friend Mr Rees may visit I Tatti, and Berenson himself will be happy to see him if there and well enough. Molly Nicolson visited recently, before that Cyril Connolly; they are expecting Rosamond Lehmann and Ernest Hemingway. His book on Piero della Francesca will not appear before July.

Letter from Bernard Berenson to Elizabeth Trevelyan

I Tatti, Settignano, Florence. - Has received and praises the speech given by Bessie at the opening of Robert's library [at Bickbeck College, London; also glad to see Forster's speech. It must have been a pleasing and happy occasion. He and Nicky are glad she has good friends in England, and he wishes he could travel and see her again. The 'Julian couple' were charming.

Letter from Bernard Berenson to Elizabeth Trevelyan

I Tatti, Settignano, Florence. - Agrees that it is difficult to destroy personal letters, though one knows they will interest others either too much or not at all; understands how she clings to those Bob wrote to her. If she comes across letters he himself wrote to Bob, please do send them on. Hopes she is getting on well with her son and his wife.

Letter from Robert Gathorne-Hardy to Elizabeth Trevelyan

The Mill House, Stanford Dingley, nr Reading, Berks. - Has written to tell Sir Edward Bridges that he can see the copy of his father's "Testament of Beauty" [a proof copy, with notes by R. C. Trevelyan] when he himself returns from Italy. Can 'almost compete with Julian over his story about the lion': relates a conversation he overhead in a Chelsea pub about an alligator in someone's room. Has not had an invitation to the opening of the library [the R. C. Trevelyan Memorial Library at Birkbeck College, London] but would love to attend.

Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

Monk's Walk Cottage, Much Marcle, Dymock, Gloucester. - Is pleased that Trevelyan liked the "Hymn [to Love]", which another friend had criticised, and has sent it to Massingham. Is interested by the resemblance to Persian poetry, of which he knows little (he praises Fitzgerald's "Salaman and Absal"), and should like to see the poets mentioned by Trevelyan, particularly the Hafiz. Keen to know what Persian metres are like, especially after reading Headlam's belief that Aeschylus was indebted to them for some of his choric measures. Discussion of Japanese poetry, with a "Hokku" composed by himself, and of the "Song of Songs". Expresses the belief that this is a collection of songs rather than a continuous poem. His approach to his book reviewing; is a little concerned that Trevelyan has been guided by it to buy books. Discussion of their sons: hopes David might have "music in him".

Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

12 Westbank Rd, Birkenhead (MS correction to "The Gallows" headed notepaper. - Praises Trevelyan's poem "The Death of Man", which has been privately circulated in a small edition. Munitions work is tiring. Asks how Julian gets on with his poetry; the only one of his own family who is at all poetic is Michael, who is fond of rhyme.

Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

The University, Leeds. - Thanks Trevelyan for returning a book by [? Herbert] Read. On a recent visit to Cambridge to examine the Milton MS at Trinity, he and his wife Catherine met Julian Trevelyan, who took them out to Terence Gray's theatre [the Cambridge Festival Theatre]. In Trinity Library, Abercrombie also discovered a MS play written by Tennyson at the age of 14, "The Devil and the Lady". Has been reading Giussani's edition of Lucretius.

Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

Gosberton House, Nr. Spalding. - Abercrombie has been lecturing; he has received £100 from the Royal Literary Fund and has a new-found appreciation for "Carnegie and those jockeys". "New Numbers" is coming to an end, as Rupert [Brooke] is fighting (he has just returned from Antwerp), Wilfrid [Gibson] is making more money elsewhere, and he himself isn't writing poetry at the moment. Catherine is doing well after the birth of their third son [Ralph]. Asks if Bessie knows Van Dorn [Willem van Doorn] who has been staying with Wilfrid. Frost and his family are staying at "The Gallows". Asks if Julian knows the Great Northern's Atlantic engines.

Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

The Cottage, Silverdale, Carnforth - Expresses his and his wife's delight at being the dedicatees of Trevelyan's new collection ["The Death of Man"]. Hopes Julian's health improves when his tonsils are out. Is glad the "Moore business" [the obtaining of an allowance from the Civil List for him?] has gone well so far; was sorry not to have heard from Hewlett. Is anxious about the police and "hope[s] they mean business this time": feels that their success or failure will determine the nature of "the revolution". "[T]hat little swine Winston" ought to be "done in".

Postcard from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

Ryton, Dymock; addressed to The Shiffolds, forwarded c/o Mr Llewellyn Esquire, Underhill, Chyngton Rd, Seaford. - Thinks the dates Trevelyan suggests are suitable, but since Catherine and Gibson arrive on Monday they will discuss it then. David has been badly bitten by a dog, which fortunately was not rabid. Hopes Julian is doing well 'from his change'. They had a good week in Anglesey in September.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Sorry that Elizabeth is having so much trouble with Julian; expects he 'likes his old nurse best', and resembles Robert in not being able to 'bear a change'; unlucky that he is also unwell. Elizabeth need not worry about deciding whether they should visit Wallington yet. It is very cold, but the house is warm and comfortable; perhaps the doctor should be asked if the change of air would be good. Hopes C[harles] and M[ary] will cheer her up - they will be 'excited about politics' - and that Elizabeth will be able to keep Nurse Catt a while longer so that things can settle. Sir George is anxious that she should not feel 'bound' to come to Wallington. Sees that '[Bessie's] old Judge is ill, & his old Report coming out!'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Glad they can hope to see Elizabeth; thinks it is the best thing, especially as she is keeping Nurse Catt, which is very good news; the other nurse cannot have been very clever or she would have made friends with [Julian]. Charlie calls him 'a superb little chap'; he and Mary will be glad it is settled. Asks Elizabeth to tell Nurse Catt how glad she is she is staying, and that the north country air will do her good. Asks her to let Maria know when to expect them [at Grosvenor Crescent]; discusses travel arrangements. Sir Charles Dalrymple and his daughter [Alice?] are visiting on the 24th, and some neighbours are coming to dinner, but otherwise they will be quiet. Geordie [George Lowthian Trevelyan] has recovered from chickenpox and the girls show no sign of it yet; they have not been to Wallington so Julian will be safe. Politics is very exciting; was 'very glad the Conference failed'. Elizabeth's Dutch paper has begun to arrive. Sure she has done the best thing about the nurse, even if Mrs Catt only stays a few months. Good for the Liberal party to have the R[ussell] Reas at Tannhurst [sic: Tanhurst]; fears Elizabeth cannot fight the seat this time. Asks Elizabeth in a postscript to send a telegraph with their arrival day, as she may want to go to Newcastle.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - News of Julian, who 'evidently thought that it was an innovation [sic] not to find [Elizabeth] in the library', and Sir George, who is slightly unwell; thinks 'the excitement of the election' has over-tired him. Tomorrow it is the Rothley treat, and the Cambo treat is on Thursday. Hopes Elizabeth is having a good time at Rounton [Grange, home of the Bells]; misses her and loved having her for such a long stay.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Sorry that the journey to Rounton was 'so agitating'. Mary has written to say the wedding went well; Elizabeth's account is amusing. Expects she misses Julian, but they are glad to have him for a little longer at Wallington; he has been playing with his toys then was happy for Hearne [the butler] to carry him upstairs. Hopes Elizabeth and Robert have a good Christmas Day; asks to be remembered to the Enticknaps; hopes Gussie got home safely. Will be nice if Elizabeth comes to fetch Julian on Thursday. Sir George says there is a good review of Mrs [Janet] Ross in the "Nation"; she hopes Robert will lend her the book ["Lives of the early Medici as told in their correspondence"]

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Sorry for late letters: the posts are 'much disorganised'; has sent a telegram by the nurse who is taking Julian out in the pony cart; gives news of the child. Glad the R[ussell] Reas are friendly; sure they will be pleasant neighbours. Sir George is well again, and has been round with her 'to give presents & talk to the people', who all seemed to be enjoying Christmas.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Good to hear that Julian is settled in his own nursery again; sure he remembers it 'as he notices so much'. Very glad that nurse [Mrs Catt] is really better, and hopes all will go well now. She and Sir George are settling down at Welcombe; they are alone till George and Janet come on Wednesday. Sir George says Elizabeth 'must not mind about paying'. Sends love to Bob, and says she 'will read the Medici letters [edited by Janet Ross] with much interest'. She and Sir George did not like the Post impressionists [the exhibition organised by Roger Fry at the Grafton Galleries] which 'leave the impression of a bad, & rather nasty dream, though [she] can see how clever some of it is'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Begins the letter 'Dear as a daughter', which she says was used by 'an old Medici lady' in the book Robert has lent her ["Lives of the early Medici as told in their correspondence", by Janet Ross], which she finds interesting but has not yet finished. Annie [Philips] is here and seems well. Is more or less recovered from her 'little feverish attack'. Glad to have good news of Julian. Asks if Elizabeth can send back 'the Shetland scarf' if she is not using it, as it 'does not look as "invalidy" as a shawl'; glad she is better. The 'A.S's' [Arthur and Charlotte Sidgwick], Janet and George 'amalgamated well'. Asks if Elizabeth's maids have recovered, and hopes the nurse [Mrs Catt] is sleeping better. Miss Richardson is here and is going with TitBits [the horse] 'to see sights accompanied by Annie's maid'. Sir George was very pleased to get Robert's letter; he has had a correspondence 'with "the master" [of Trinity, Cambridge, Montagu Butler?] on classical things'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Relieved all well about the measles; does not think it will spread and is glad the little girl [May Enticknap: see 46/174] is getting better. Would very much like to see Julian; expects he will soon be crawling. Mary goes home tomorrow; she has been very good, and much amused her grandfather, with whom she has long conversations. Sidney Lee stayed last night; the Ernest Trevelyans are coming from Oxford on Sunday. C[harles] and M[ary] cannot come till Sunday morning as it is 'the Ministerial ?Amusement'. She and Sir George will go up to town about the 22nd; she has a ticket for Elizabeth for the concert then. Sends her regards if Mrs Hubrecht [wife of Ambrosius Hubrecht?] is still there; had thought it was 'Mrs Jan' staying with Elizabeth. Glad her son's [Jan or Paul?] expedition is interesting. Hopes Mr Carter recovers soon. Sends love to Robert; hopes 'the musician with the striking name [Benvingut Socias i Mercadé, see 46/174] ' is pleasant. 'What praise of Strauss's new opera ["Elektra"]!'. A postscript saying she is glad 'Patterson succeeded'.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Glad to hear Julian is crawling now; will send a parcel for his birthday soon. Unlucky that Miss [Margaret?] V[aughan] Williams has caught measles; it can be bad in adults. Miss Martin came to Welcombe yesterday; they expect the Runcimans, Janet, and George on Saturday; think Charlie is also coming since he stayed at home with a cold last week. Thinks Elizabeth will like Mrs Walter Rea; glad she has 'such nice neighbours'. She and Sir George move to London on 22 Feb; she will go to the concert on the way from the station, and asks whether Elizabeth will be there. Asks how she liked 'the Spaniard' [Benvingut Socias i Mercadé, see 46/174]. Nice that Julian listens to music.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Glad that Elizabeth has heard of some nurses who may suit her, but sorry that she has this trouble. Good that Julian is so well; she and Sir George hope to visit in October and see him. Thinks [E. M.] Forster must be interesting, since his novels are 'so clever & original', though she does not think he manages plot well. Has been reading [Myra Kelly's] "Little Aliens", about 'the little Jew children in America', which is 'pretty & funny; but quite slight'. Sorry Mr [Donald] Tovey is not progressing quickly, but it must require much work to write the music for an opera ["The Bride of Dionysus"]; probably best that it will not be put on next summer, as 'the world will be simply mad over the Coronation'. George's children are 'much improved': Mary has shown no signs of temper; Theo is 'passionate occasionally' but still young, and a 'very nice boy'; [Humphry] seems quite strong now.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - She and Sir George will be delighted to stay at Elizabeth's lodgings [at Eastbourne] for a couple of days; thinks Booa [Mary Prestwich] will come but they need to 'settle about housemaids'. Caroline's throat is nearly better, though she has bad rheumatism in her back. Knows Elizabeth will take care of her; will be glad to see 'the dear boy [Julian']. Not sure whether to bring Henry [Lane, the footman?]; difficult to know where he would eat, but 'he is very useful & nice & could wait at table'. Was good to see Robert this morning.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Glad that Elizabeth is comfortably settled in her lodgings [at Eastbourne]. She and Sir George went to the Burlington Hotel there a while ago; she was not impressed by the food but expects the Grand is worse, 'it certainly looks seedy'. Is not sure when they can come, since she has been ill and it is still very cold. Was glad to see Robert, though he 'seemed tired and out of spirits', hopes he is better; very sorry for Elizabeth's 'domestic worries'. Longs to see Julian; hopes Mrs Catt [the nurse] will soon be better. Wants to take Booa [Mary Prestwich] to stay with Miss [name illegible] while they are at Eastbourne, which would 'do her good'. Annie [Philips] is coming on her way to Pen Moel; the news of Meggy [Price] is bad and Phil [Morgan Philips Price] has 'not been heard of for some time'. Newspapers very interesting at the moment. Asks if there would be room for her and Sir George at Elizabeth's lodgings.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Glad that Elizabeth has got home safely and that Julian is happy. Encloses a cheque from Sir George to settle their account [for the stay at Eastbourne]. Annie [Philips] and Robin [Price] have been here this afternoon; they came to the crematorium at Golders Green [for the cremation of her sister Margaret Price] and have just left for Pen Moel. Annie says it is 'dreadful to have 2 days!' and has promised not to go to Tibberton for the funeral tomorrow. Good of Charles and George to go this morning, as well as Morton [Philips], two of the Gregs, Annie Thompson and Betty Bostock [?]. Sir George is well, and she feels better; they had a 'quiet walk in Kensington Gardens' yesterday and today, and she has started taking a tonic. Looks forward to seeing Elizabeth on Friday.

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