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Dickinson, Goldsworthy Lowes (1862-1932) humanist, historian and philosopher
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Letters from J. Ellis McTaggart

Letters dated Mar. - Apr. 1908. Accompanied by two cuttings, one an obituary notice for McTaggart from The Times of 19 Jan. 1925, and another from The Sunday Times of 20 Dec. 1931, a review of G. Lowes Dickinson's McTaggart by Desmond MacCarthy.

Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

Monk's Walk Cottage, Much Marcle, Dymock, Gloucester. - Returns the "Dutchman" [a translation of Joost van den Vondel's "Lucifer" by Bob and Elizabeth Trevelyan] which he has copied and thinks they should finish. Is glad Trevelyan likes "Mary and the Bramble"; agrees with his criticisms of it for lack of lucidity, and of the vulgarity in one passage (also criticised by Abercrombie's wife). The poem will be self-published. Hopes to host Dickinson soon, and would like to do the same for Trevelyan before the end of the year. May have to go to London, and if he does would like to meet and take in a concert, as he misses music a great deal. Sends a poem which is rather a metrical experiment.

Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

The Gallows, Ryton, Dymock, Gloucester. - Very sorry to hear of Trevelyan's "trouble and disappointment" [a miscarriage]; is glad that "Mrs Bob" is making a good recovery. Is alone since his wife and son are in Sheffield for medical treatment. Has written little poetry since his return from Italy, being occupied with his "Speculative Dialogues" (now postponed) and critical work on Thomas Hardy: "A real big fellow, I think he is now". Has also taken on play-reading for the Liverpool Theatre. Is glad to hear of Trevelyan's work on the "Agamemnon" [of Aeschylus]; he feels that "an actable version" of the whole "Oresteia" is needed, and should Trevelyan do one he'll try his best to get it acted in Liverpool. The theatre is very badly off, but he is trying to get good plays there: will ask Dickinson if he may suggest his "Lassalle" and also attempt to get Bottomley put on. Is interested to hear of Trevelyan's "Hun poet" [Ferenc Békássy?]; it is the Servians [sic] who most intrigue him at the moment. Asks if Trevelyan knows of any translations of the Servian Kosovo cycle. He and Moore have had a very amusing correspondence.

Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

The Gallows, Ryton, Dymock, Gloucester. - Glad to hear that Trevelyan has returned safely [from his trip to India, China and Japan]. Hopes that he will soon come to visit them; Abercrombie has "rigged up" an outside bathroom. Trevelyan should have some fine new material, but Abercrombie hopes he won't become an "Eastern poet" as Bantock became an "Eastern" musician after one trip to Egypt. Asks if Dickinson writes for the "Manchester Guardian" under the name "Don", as an article contrasting China and India has recently appeared. Has told Ransome what Trevelyan says about the case [brought by Lord Alfred Douglas] and hopes he may recover soon.

Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

Stick figure hanging from a gallows (labelled 'The Kaiser') used instead of an address. - The Abercrombies are settled back at "The Gallows": the bicycles restored after some neglect by the Frosts, and a new 'domestic' appointed. Ironic comments about both this woman and her predecessor. David is delighted with the daffodils: contrast of his romanticism with his brother Mike's realism. The children's fond memories of time at the Trevelyans'. Very interested in the news of the professorship in Toronto, has written to Dickinson to say that if there is a decent salary he will apply. Sends 'a specimen of your Favourite Passion'. Apologises for the mistake with Trevelyan's "New Numbers"; the Gibsons sent them out. The Abercrombies have bought a gramophone.

Letter from Lascelles Abercrombie to R. C. Trevelyan

20 Marmion Rd, Sefton Park, Liverpool. - Pressure of work has kept him in Liverpool, and he will not be able to get away to Italy. Sorry to miss Trevelyan's company, and guilty as he feels he has probably prevented someone else being invited. Hopes they are all enjoying the Casa [Boccaccio?], and sends regards to Dickinson and Norton.

Letter from Caroline Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Glad Elizabeth had a good time with the Röntgens; hopes [Julius] was satisfied with his concert. Asks if Robert will be back with her soon; hears George comes tomorrow. The three children [Pauline, George and Kitty?] came yesterday and have gone to John Middleton's birthday party. Would like to hear Julian tell his experiences; Booa [Mary Prestwich] says he told her most about the Ship Canal. Delighted about the Dutch elections and congratulates Elizabeth; hopes things will be much better now. Has had a busy morning with wages, accounts and so on; Grace has not yet left, but Caroline thinks she will soon go to Buxton. Sir George sends his love; he likes having the children, who are behaving well, here. Was interested in [Goldsworthy] L[owes] Dickinson's letter.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Agrees with Robert's view of Euripides, although he reads so much of him; discusses Macaulay's view of the "Iphigenia in Tauris". Has just finished [Aristophanes's] "Batrachoi" ["The Frogs"] with 'intense delight'. Has finished the 'American part' of his book [a volume of "The American Revolution"] and has one concluding chapter left to write. Will send Bessy a hare if he can get one. Would like to make [Goldsworthy Lowes] Dickinson a 'Special Commissioner of Road Traffic'].

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Robert seems to have a 'very good opportunity for a tour' [with Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson]; it is a 'great thing' to go to India and 'see Britain in her imperial character', which is more 'noble and humane' than that of any other 'great dominant nation', and Japan must be 'a wonderful sight'. Caroline will look after Elizabeth, and they will 'make themselves responsible' for any arrangements best for her and Julian.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Morpeth. - Read Robert's letter about Agra and Futtehpore Sikra [Fatehpur Sikri] to himself and aloud to Caroline; a fine account of a 'wonderful country', which must be a 'most rare time' for Robert and his companions; feels envious. Remembers his own sight of Agra, and Delhi under perfect conditions 'fresh from the siege' and living for a week with 'an extraordinarily clever and prominent hero of the mutiny'. During his father's time there, a young civil servant shot himself in one of the pavilions of the Taj Mahal, leaving a note saying he had 'chosen to die in the loveliest spot on earth'. When thinking of the fort at Agra, always remembers George pointing out that if Sir Charles had remained in India, he would have been Governor of the North West Provinces during the Mutiny while [John] Lawrence was in the Punjab: 'A grand job he would have made of it!'. Likes Robert's photograph of the tomb and painted marble. They are all happy, and Julian is very well. Asks Robert to tell [Goldsworthy] Lowes Dickinson that they hope he will visit them.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Bessy read them Robert's account of the Maharajah at breakfast, and Sir George received the letter from Benares [Varanasi]; he himself was there, but probably only between trains; Warren Hastings was there longer and liked it less. Has a vague recollection of a ghaut [ghat], a little like Robert's postcards. That was fifty years ago and much has changed; today is Gladstone's birthday, and it says much about the man that that is remembered 'half a generation after his death'. Sorry that [Goldsworthy Lowes] Dickinson was so ill; hopes he is 'permanently right again' now. In the future, Robert will be glad to have got to know a 'great native household' [that of the Maharajah of Chhatapur], rather than going to Burma; he himself prefers his 'thorough, and rather dearly-earned knowledge of Calcutta' than to have seen more, 'even more romantic objects'. Their journey south on Friday was 'arduous' but went well; Julian behaved perfectly and enjoyed it very much. Is reading the later volume of Gibbon, and more or less agrees with Robert that 'they are a stately bridge between the anciend and the modern world'; keeps thinking what a 'bright man of the world' Gibbon was.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Looking forward to seeing Robert and Elizabeth at Wallington. Robert must be having a good time with [Goldsworthy Lowes] Dickinson 'in such scenery and circumstances'. Glad about 'the Water-lane'. Charles and Mary will be at Cambo for a good part of their visit. Must read [Aristophanes's] "Thesmophoriazusae" again; remembers [Charles] Vaughan saying 'how much he liked the three female comedies'. Is entering Macaulay's marks in his favourite Cicero speeches in the Dolphin [edition]; has already done this for the Terence. Miss Richardson has again got 'three County Council scholarships... not bad for a school of 60 children'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

22 Sussex Villas, W. - Has written to Mrs Grammont [sic: Bramine Hubrecht] 'about her young Russian'. Tells Bessie to make sure Bob writes the article on [Thomas Sturge] Moore as soon as he gets home. Will be away from the middle of March to the middle of May, so Bob must communicate directly with [Edward] Jenks about the article, unless [Nathaniel] Wedd or [Goldie Lowes] Dickinson return from their Easter holiday in time to take it. Glad they have got 'such a jolly place'.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to Elizabeth Trevelyan

2, Cheyne Gardens, S. W. - Thanks Bessie for her letter; they were 'much amused and pleased at Goldie [Lowes Dickinson]'s horror of the man of war', but Bessie never 'saw Goldie dressed up in his war paint' as George did when they were 'volunteers together'. Afraid he and Janet cannot lunch on Wednesday 20th, and he is lecturing at Cambridge on Thursday 21st. Invites her to come to tea with them on Wednesday, or to dinner just with Jan on Thursday. Asks to be remembered to Jan [Hubrecht], and sends good wishes to his wife.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R.C. Trevelyan and Elizabeth Trevelyan

90 High Street, Oxford. - Thanks Bob and Bessie for their letters. In twenty-four hours, he and Janet will be married; there is 'too much to say to begin saying it'. Will return to Cheyne Gardens by the middle of May; expects they will see each other soon after that. Tells Bob in a postscript to send his article on [Thomas Sturge] Moore to E. Jenks when he has finished if none of Goldie [Dickinson], [Robin] Mayor or [Nathaniel] Wedd are in England.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Chelsea. - Dated 'Sunday'. Apologises for not sending the books earlier; was very busy with the lectures and with arranging for his parents visiting to see Helen [Coombe]; Goldie [Lowes Dickinson] and 'a sister' have also been staying. Has filled the box up with clothes which Mrs Smith [their landlady] thought Bob 'ought to want'. Says 'I told you so' about Bob being in Italy: it is better than 'going Jonkopping in Sweden [visiting Jönköping?]' and he might get some work done; suggests going to Fiesole or Prato, though that might be too hot. Asks if Bob intends to stay till winter; if so they will arrange to meet. Everything now settled: he and Helen hope to marry early in November and come out to Italy. Has had 'rather an awful time with his parents': very sorry for his father and his disappointment in him and so 'made a huge effort to get through the misunderstanding' but only gave him and his mother pain. This has made him 'awfully depressed'; found it hard to 'pull himself together for the lectures' but thinks they were the best he has done; pleased that both Goldie and [Thomas Sturge?] Moore liked them. Has been bicycling with Goldie, who is 'getting more reconciled about Helen'; thinks he 'begins to see that it can't make any real difference between [them]'. They went to Woodbridge and tried but failed to find [Edward] Fitzgerald's grave, then to Dedham 'which is the only [piece of French country in England and explains Constable'. Helen's harpsichord [which she is decorating for Arnold Dolmetsch] is 'going to be a great success'; she is 'quite decided' that Bob must either come back for the wedding or meet them in Italy.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Durbins. - Has not sent [Bob's translation of Aristophanes's] "Lysistrata" yet as he wanted Goldie [Lowes Dickinson's] criticisms; Goldie came on Sunday and Fry will read it to Madame Donnay [sic: Vera Donnet] tomorrow. Will try two days in town. Has read Bob's "Lucretius [On Death]" 'with very great delight; would like to bring out a second book, called "Lucretius On Origins" or similar. They should 'stir up Desmond [MacCarthy] to the point of writing' and perhaps advertise 'in educational places - girls' colleges & such like'; Margery [his sister] tells him about 'yearning intellectual appetites among the lower middle classes of Birmingham' though he is unsure 'whether they'd rise to' Lucretius. Is much better for his 'long rest', though managed to 'paint a good lot'; expects to be in town a little now, if he keeps well, but will be back at Durbins after 23 Mar when Pamela returns, so Bob could come over again then.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

7 Dalmeny Avenue, N.7. - Would have liked very much to come down and hates not seeing Goldie [Lowes Dickinson], but will not be able to get away unless he 'stick[s] at the jobs' keeping him: wants to finish a 'big nude' he hopes to send to the Autumn Salon. Dr [Edmond] Bonniot, 'gendre [son in law] de. M [Stéphane] Mallarme will not let Fry use the French text [in Fry's proposed English translation of Mallarme's poems], putting forward 'purely dog-in-the-manger' arguments in his letter to Gide; will go on anyway but it will 'spoil the reader's ease very much'. Would like to discuss his preface with Bob at some point. Sends love to Goldie; asks if there is any chance of him coming to town for a night or two this week.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

Naples. - They go to Rome in two days, and can be reached there by Post[e] Rest[ante]. Bob must be generous to this letter as it was written 'after a day of rain & scirocco and sight seeing'. The news about 'Mrs Bertie' [Alys Russell?] has made them 'pretty indignant, and supports Helen's opinion of the character of 'P. Smith' [housekeeper at Beaufort Street?]. Bob, with his 'horror of moving & doing household things' will suffer; perhaps he should stay at Welcombe.. Jokingly suggests then 'retract[s]' the idea that Bob should 'spend three years choosing or educating a wife'. Thanks Bob for al he 'did about the picture'; he and Mrs W[iddrington?] have been marvellous about it. A confusion over Taormina involving [Alfred?] Thornton and [Francis?] Bate. Never got chance to continue with the Galatea picture, but hopes he might yet finish it; has done 'lots of studies of seaweed etc', and Goldie [Dickinson] has seen the painting and likes it. He and Helen had 'rather a serious time' when his parents came; they arrived a day early with 'all the other people whom we'd offended, including Ezekiel'. The talk was 'geological' rather than 'the wild orgies of the [Terence?] Bourke regine & the fierce gladiatorial shows... of [Bob's] reign'; assures Bob that their arguments do not matter; means to find out 'what it is that annoys some people so much in my way of arguing). His father was 'very nice' and got on well with Helen; his parents took her off on a driving tour of Etna while he himself stayed to work. Tells of visiting 'Mrs C' [Florence Cacciola Trevelyan] with his parents, and being menaced by her dogs. They went several times to see the Gramonts [Grandmonts] and had some 'splendid music', with ' more kindly scandal from Mrs G.'; they are nice people. Not enough time to tell of their 'quaint adventures at Pestum and Agropoli', and Pompeii, 'the apotheosis of shoddy' and so quite loveable, as 'immoral as the Brighton pavillion [sic] and as charming as a Japanese toy'. They stopped there a week at a 'filthy inn' where Goldie, [Nathaniel] Wedd and [Augustus Moore] Daniel came to stay: Daniel great fun, Wedd 'cussing & swearing because its not England'; got on 'splendidly with them'. He and Helen are now staying in Santa Lucia; he goes out in the morning to buy bread and ricotta at street stalls, and milk straight from the 'street cows'; they have been up Vesuvius. Reassures Bob about his poetry: he and many others have 'betted heavily' on him so he must 'make a success of it'; is sure he himself will, having been just where Bob is; 'one comes though by mere pigheadedness'.

Letter from Roger Fry to R. C. Trevelyan

12 Pembroke Gardens, Kensington, W. - Thanks Bob for the books [Bob's "Mallow and Asphodel"?]; had already seen Oswald Sickert's copy ; agrees that black [covers?] would have been better, but 'some day we will elaborate together an edition de luxe'. Will send on [Robert] Bridges's copy though he is 'rather angry' with him at the moment, will tell Bob why when they see each other. Dined with [Bernard] Berenson last night, who is 'interesting & he admires Goldie [Dickinson] immensely' so Fry will like him. He may take Bob's book when he goes to see Helen on Saturday, an experiment he 'half long[s] for and half dread[s]'; will write to Bob or Goldie about the visit but fears it will not have any effect.

Letter from George Macaulay Trevelyan to R.C. Trevelyan

Union Society, Cambridge. - Is sending the books. They talk here of 'nothing but the School board now': McT[aggart] is 'Rileyite of course', but Sanger and Dickinson are opposed to him. Is going to the [Harrow] 'Old Boy's' on 1 December, and asks if Bob will also be there; also asks what there will be to see in London around the 12th, and whether Bob will be at Wallington at all this vacation. Is appreciating Wordsworth for the first time, in Matthew Arnold's selection, the only way he has found so far of 'getting at him through the mass of rubbish with which he surrounded his throne'.

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