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Hubrecht, Paul François (1829-1902) lawyer and politician
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Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Robert's letter 'was a great surprise': it became his duty to consult his parents before proposing marriage when he chose 'not to adopt a profession by which [he] would contribute to [his] own support'. He and Caroline are prepared to double his present allowance to eight hundred pounds a year when he marries Miss Van der Hoeven, and will settle an insurance on his wife and children with the Equitable Mutual Society with no annual premium to pay. Tells Robert to write when he has shown this letter to Hubrecht [Paul François Hubrecht, Elizabeth's uncle].

Draft letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Sir George Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague. - Accepts that the blame 'implied' in his father's letter [12/31] was 'well-deserved': he should have consulted his parents before asking anyone to marry him; it was no excuse that he was unsure of the answer he would receive to his proposal [to Elizabeth van der Hoeven]. Thinks the proposed allowance is generous, also that Mr Hubrecht agrees, but he is writing to Sir George himself to 'make the situation simpler clearer'; he said much the same about Robert's not speaking to his parents first as Sir George had.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Robert's letter [final version 46/75] was all he could wish; wishes him great joy in his marriage, Miss van der Hoeven has written 'very sweetly' to Caroline and they are eager to meet and welcome her to the family. Acknowledges the business point which Mr Hubrecht raises, and has resolved it in his letter by agreeing to covenant to pay Robert eight hundred pounds a year 'unless and until' he comes into a capital which will bring him that income; has asked Hubrecht to tell him Miss van der Hoeven's financial position, but whatever this is, 'the marriage is a settled thing'.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Has heard from [Paul François] Hubrecht and received a copy of the [marriage] contract, which he will show to Ellis [his lawyer] on Tuesday and give him instructions on drawing up the settlement and allowance grant; they can discuss this when Robert comes on Friday, and will know by then when Ellis wants Robert to sign the settlement. Is just starting for London.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to R. C. Trevelyan

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Has sent the [marriage] contract to [Paul François] Hubrecht and encloses the certificate. Asks if Robert will come to lunch at Grosvenor Crescent on Wednesday; their appointment with Mr Ellis [the lawyer] is at four pm and they must be there together. Rooms have been taken at the hotel [in the Hague for the upcoming marriage?]. They return [to London] late tomorrow.

Letter from Sir Henry Howard to R. C. Trevelyan

British Legation, The Hague. - Has seen Henry Turing, the British consul at Rotterdam, who confirms that the information Sir Henry gave Robert regarding his forthcoming marriage is correct: since his fiancé is a Dutch citizen, the marriage must be solemnized at the town hall in the Hague, and Turing must be present as consul so that the marriage can be properly registered in England. Turing has promised to come to the Hague; Robert is to pay for his expenses and consular fees. Mr [Paul] Hubrecht will be able to advise on the Dutch formalities. Sends regards to Elizabeth van der Hoeven and Robert's family.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Sorry to hear from Bessie this morning that her aunt was unwell; hopes she has now recovered. Bessie seems well, and they have had a good time at Welcombe; they go tomorrow to Dorking and on Monday to Dorking. She and his parents and brothers are now 'great friends'. Encloses a letter [13/36] from Sir Henry Howard [British ambassador to the Netherlands] saying that [Henry] Turing [British consul at Rotterdam] will come to the Hague for the wedding. Has spoken to his father, who will consult an English lawyer, on the points discussed with Hubrecht. Will see an oculist when he is in London on Monday; the spectacles can be sent if they are not ready when Bessie leaves; will also pay Luzac's bill. Asks to be remembered to Hubrecht's wife and Louisa; his parents send their regards.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Glad to hear Hubrecht's wife has been outside and hopes to find her 'really better' when he comes over in May. Bessie has told him Hubrecht does not object to Whitweek for the wedding; this will be best for Robert's parents and brothers who all intend to come; doubts if anyone else from England will come; Hubrecht and Bessie should decide on the exact date. This will depend on when the Rotterdam consul [Henry Turing] can come; asks whether it would be best for him or Hubrecht to write about that, or should he ask Sir Henry Howard to do so? Bessie says they will probably need another witness; remembers Hubrecht said that if the consul were Dutch he might do, or he would have no objection to [Abraham] Bredius or any other friend of Hubrecht. If it is necessary to have an affidavit indicating his parents' consent this will be arranged. Has seen his birth certificate; the settlement is being drawn up at the lawyers. Very glad his parents are coming. Will write soon to Sir Henry Howard to let him know the date. Will come over as soon as Bessie wants him to. Bessie made all his family 'very fond of her' when she visited, and his friends who met her also liked her very much.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking, - Will see the Dutch consul as soon as possible to get his birth certificate authenticated; his father has told the lawyers to have the settlement ready to be signed by Wednesday, so should be able to cross to the Netherlands that night. Expects Bessie has told Hubrecht that Mr [Henry] Turing [British consul at Rotterdam] has agreed to come on the 7th [for the wedding. He, his father, and the lawyers, have approved the contract of marriage which Hubrecht sent; details about its return. Will be at 3 Hare Court, Inner Temple, from tomorrow until he comes over.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - He and his wife appreciate the feelings Hubrecht and his wife have about the future of Miss [Elizabeth] van der Hoeven, who has written to his wife. Hopes and believes that the marriage will make both young people happy, and will reward the Hubrechts for their 'kindness and affection towards [their] niece'. Looks forward to meeting them. Has himself five times been to the Netherlands as a tourist, visited the scene of William [the Silent?]'s death at Delft, and 'read the whole of [John] Motley's "Dutch Republic' on Dutch soil'. Glad that the proposals satisfy Hubrecht; brings up the point of what Robert's position would be after his and Caroline's death, when he will be 'independent and at ease'; suggests that as well as the settlement on Robert's wife and children already discussed, he and Caroline should covenant to pay him personally eight hundred pounds a year until then. Regarding the settlement itself, expects Hubrecht knows what an 'exceptional institution... the Equitable Mutual is" Would be glad to know what Miss van der Hoeven's 'personal circumstances' are. Asks in a postscript if the Hubrechts consider the marriage 'sufficiently fixed' to make it known; on their side it is so.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - He and his wife are quite satisfied with what Hubrecht proposes: understands that Elizabeth will manage her own property and pay 'three hundred pounds annually to sustaining the household'. Enclosing a 'rough, but substantially accurate, description of the Equitable [Mutual Insurance Society]' in his own hand, outlining the way it functions and the favourable opinion held of it by Sir Robert Hamilton 'the ablest English public servant of our day'; says he has insured all three of hims sons, and himself, for ten thousand pounds each, paying Robert's premium as a lump sum in 1882; has written to the Actuary for a printed account which he will send on. Will now inform their relatives of the forthcoming marriage.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - He and his wife are very anxious about Madame Hubrecht's health, about which Elizabeth gives them regular news. The young couple seen 'exceedingly happy in their home', having spent part of the summer at Wallington. In January he and his wife are going to Sicily, then to Rome, returning to England at Easter as they feel they should have 'two or three months in London as a sort of duty'. The General Election was 'disastrous to the Liberal party' and he thinks 'not creditable to the country or the Government'. Asks to be remembered to Hubrecht's wife and daughter [Marie?], and son [Ambrosius] when he next sees him.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Originally enclosing, as promised, details on the Equitable [and Mutual Insurance Society] with annotations by himself to indicate the value of the insurance now and by the time Robert is forty-four or -five 'if things go well'; tells Hubrecht where to find information about the size of the Reserve Fund.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Sorry that Hubrecht has been disturbed by a misunderstanding; reminds him that he was not sure in his own letter [13/41] of the 'word in question' in Hubrecht's letter; he and Lady Trevelyan now understand that Elizabeth wil contribute one [not three] hundred pounds a year to household expenses, and will have the rest of her income at her own disposal. Would like to know whether her capital will be settled on her children. Robert was much pleased by his introduction to Elizabeth's friends and relations.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Thanks Hubrecht for his explanation of Dutch inheritance law, which is 'very just in principle'; has often wished there were a similar one in England. Has heard from Robert in Milan, who seems very happy. They look forward to a visit from Elizabeth whenever is convenient for her. Sir Henry Howard [British ambassador to the Netherlands] is his cousin; sure he will be much interested; will be necessary to 'make all safe on the side of English law'.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Hopes that Hubrecht's wife is much better and not 'overdone' by the trouble which a marriage inevitably brings. He and his wife are looking forward to their visit; they intend to come straight from London to the Hague on the 1 June and to keep their rooms at the "Oude Doelen" hotel throughout their stay even if they make any excursions. His wife will write to Elizabeth about the hotel nearer the time. Has read the marriage contract and will show it to his lawyer in London next week; will then instruct him to arrange the settlement of the Equitable [and Mutual] Insurance and the allowance to Robert.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

8 Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - He and his wife wish to leave the question of whether there should be a religious ceremony for Robert and Elizabeth's marriage to Hubrecht and his wife. They 'quite sympathise' with the desire for the marriage party to be 'quiet and familar', as their own wedding was the same; will not ask Hubrecht to invite any of their relations from England but will come alone with Robert's two brothers and ask if an apartment could be reserved at the hotel for them; will arrange about rooms for the servants themselves. They have no relations in the Netherlands but Sir Henry Howard; the connection between his family and theirs has been 'so old and honourable', and he has shown such marked recent kindness, that Sir George wishes him and his wife to invited to the luncheon. Has written a separate note [13/48] about the papers he is sending for Hubrecht's inspection; will have them immediately engrossed for Robert to sign once they come back from the Netherlands.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

8 Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Originally enclosing the draft of the [marriage] settlement and the undertaking [by himself and his wife] to pay a yearly allowance of eight hundred pounds to Robert until either of their deaths, when he will receive twenty thousand pounds; this was his wife's settlement and his own and is now assured to Robert in addition to any other sum they may leave. The policy Robert settles on Elizabeth is worth fourteen thousand pounds now, and has prospects of reaching a large sum 'if he lives to be old, or even elderly'. Encloses a cutting from today's "Times" ["The Money Market", "Times" 36136, p 4] with under-linings in pen, showing that the average increase in policies in the Equitable [and Mutual Life Assurance Society] is over one hundred percent.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - He and his wife will be pleased to dine with Hubrecht on 5 June; will let him know as soon as possible whether Charles and George will be in the Hague in time to come too. In response to Hubrecht's questions, encloses a letter from Mr Ellis [13/50], a 'solicitor of the highest order", nephew of Sir George's uncle [Macaulay]'s 'now well-known old friend, Thomas Flower Ellis', and son of his father's family solicitor. This explains that Robert and Elizabeth's marriage will make 'the settlement irrevocable'; the circumstances which would invalidate the covenant are, he 'hope[s] and believe[s], impossible'. Has lost his copy of the marriage contract: thought he had returned it to Hubrecht, after having read it through with Mr Ellis, both having been 'fully satisfied'.

Letter from Edmund Henry Ellis Danvers to Sir George Trevelyan

5 Delahay Street, Westminster, S.W. - Has received Sir George's letter with the two drafts; will have these copied making the 'slight addition suggested'. Returns Mr Hubrecht's letter. Explains that the settlement of the [Equitable Life] policy is irrevocable on Robert and Elizabeth's marriage. Sir George and Lady Trevelyan's covenant could be upset by creditors if they became bankrupt within two years. Does not think he has the marriage settlement which he remembers Sir George showing to him. Returns Robert's birth certificate

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

Welcombe, Stratford on Avon. - Originally enclosing the copy of the [marriage] contract which Robert has sent him; Mr Ellis [Danvers] has no corrections to suggest. They have heard from the landlord of the Oude Doelen hotel (which reminds him of pleasant visits to the hotel at Amsterdam of the same name); thanks Hubrecht for arranging their rooms.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

Hotel Oude Doelen. - The day is so fine that he and his wife are going out to Haarlem for the day, and need not 'trespass on [Hubrecht's] kindness' to take them about. Charles has arrived after a good crossing, and will call at 10 Prinsengracht [Hubrecht's house]. Very fortunate in the weather; much enjoyed the walk with Hubrecht yesterday evening. Sends regards to Hubrecht's wife, and looks forward to seeing them here tomorrow.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

8 Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - He and his wife had a good crossing after Hubrecht kindly saw them off, and return with 'pleasant recollections' of the 'kindness and cordiality' they met with in Holland. They hope that Hubrecht's wife has not suffered from 'all the movement, and the trial to her feelings'. Asks to be remembered to Hubrecht's daughter [Marie] and to the Comte and Comtess de Grammont [? Alphonse Grandmont and his wife Bramine Hubrecht?] if they are still there. Asked his lawyer today to get certified copies of the two documents [relating to a settlement and covenant made on Robert and Elizabeth Trevelyan's marriage], which is 'quite a recognised proceeding'; will take some time, as the documents must be stamped by the Inland Revenue. The 'filling up of the blank is a trifle'; explains that this clause is in Robert's favour rather than their own.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Originally enclosing the 'attested copies of the two documents' [relating to a settlement and covenant made on Robert and Elizabeth Trevelyan's marriage]; the stamp duties have now been paid. They have had happy letters from the young people, and are much looking forward to their visit this summer. His wife has had a letter from Miss [Marie] Hubrecht, and is glad to hear Madame Hubrecht's health is improved. He is hard at work and they are leading a 'quiet, rustic life'.

Letter from Sir George Trevelyan to Paul François Hubrecht

Wallington, Cambo, Northumberland. - Thanks Hubrecht for the copies of the marriage deed and inventory. Much relieved to hear that Madame Hubrecht is recovering though could wish she were doing so more quickly. Sorry not to have been in London during Hubrecht's grandson [Jan Bastiaan]'s visit; glad he will see Cambridge, 'which he is so fitted to appreciate'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

Hotel de la Poste, Bruxelles - Does not know how to thank her for her 'extraordinarily kind letter' which arrived yesterday. She will have seen his last letter to his father, acknowledging that he did wrong in not consulting them before proposing [to Elizabeth]; thinks though that everything will be for the best. Is here for two days, as he and Elizabeth's uncle agreed it would be good for him to go away for a little while after 'this last somewhat eventful and in some ways anxious week'; will return to the Hague on Thursday, and there is plenty to see. Thinks Elizabeth's uncle sanctions the engagement; unlikely the wedding could take place before the summer, as Elizabeth wants to spend more time with the Hubrechts; she also wants the Grandmonts to be there, and they do not generally return from Sicily till May or June. Expects he will soon go on to Italy. Will send a photo of Elizabeth when he returns to the Hague; his mother 'must not expect a beauty', though he finds her looks 'anything but disagreeable'. Thinks she will be able to 'look after [him] properly' as she is 'prudent and orderly, and in many ways thoroughly Dutch'; glad that her intellect is 'neither particularly poetical, nor romantic' and she has 'quite enough imagination and insight to understand anything' he might want; she has good taste for art, literature, and other things 'for a woman', and tends to be 'reflective and critical, rather than positive or creative'; she is of course 'a Protestant, at least not a Catholic'. Thinks he wrote that she knows the Nicholsons, 'by which I meant the Donaldsons of St Andrews' [James Donaldson and family?]. Has told no-one apart from the Frys [Roger and Helen] about his engagement, and will not do so until everything is settled between his father and Mr Hubrecht.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Caroline Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague. - Is writing to the relations and friends his mother mentions, and to some others; cannot therefore write for long to her, as he has to participate in some formal calls by Bessies's friends and relations this afternoon. Encloses the photograph of Bessie, which is not a good one but the best they have at the moment. All is well, which owes much to her and his father's 'extreme kindness'. Must leave for Milan next Thursday to catch the Frys [Roger and Helen] there. Kind suggestion that Bessie should visit England in the Spring; wonders if his parents will be in London or Welcombe around March, or she could come to Wallington; her uncle and aunt would certainly not object. His mother said he might find her advice 'a bore'; in fact he thought it 'very good', and will try to keep to it. Asks if she could send photographs of herself and his father to the Hubrechts; they will send theirs soon. Paid a visit to Amsterdam yesterday and saw Bessie's sister Mrs Röntgen, who is 'much pleased' with the engagement; they are very nice and he expects his mother will meet them at some point. Sends thanks to his father for his letter in a postscript; will reply soon; Bessie liked his mother's to her very much. Postscript in pencil adds that the photograph of Bessie is not good enough so they will not send it, she may perhaps get a new one done.

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