Showing 150 results

Archival description
Hubrecht, Paul François (1829-1902) lawyer and politician
Print preview View:

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague. - They have not yet retired to their 'Retraite Edéniencee [ie, at Ede]', as her cousin calls it; does not think they will go before early June. The Grandmonts are still where she left them at Rocca Bella [Taormina, Sicily] at the end of April; they are travelling back with an English friend, stopping only briefly at Florence and Bâle. Was sorry to leave Italy 'like that' but it could not be helped; made her all the more anxious to return another time. Wrote to her cousin [Bramine Hubrecht] and sent her Trevelyan's messages, but does not know whether she will go to England this summer; he does not seem anxious to go and she supposes 'the husband's opinion has great weight in these matters!'. She herself will not be able to; is currently here alone at home with her uncle and aunt [Paul François Hubrecht and his wife Maria] and would not like to leave them when she would have to go 'to fit in with Senior's week at St. Andrews'. Thanks Trevelyan for his letter and the trouble he took with the list of books, though she has not yet got all those he suggested, in part because the library is currently closed. Fortunately the director is a friend of the family and can be persuaded to break the rule forbidding books to be taken or sent into the country, so they sometimes get a good selection sent to Ede; however spring-cleaning is 'a holy business' in this country so she must wait. Asks if Trevelyan could possibly send some of the books he listed: something by Henry James; his father's book; [Robert] Browning's letters; she will get [William?] Morris's "Life" [by J. W. MacKail and his brother's book from the library. Has been reading [Elizabeth Barrett Browning's] "Aurora Leigh" for the first time; asks whether Trevelyan likes it. Will be curious to see Trevelyan's friend [Thomas Sturge Moore]'s poems which he sent to her cousin; wonders whether they will appreciate it; does not think Mrs Grandmont has 'specially classical tastes'. Would be very nice if Trevelyan could come to Ede this summer; unsure still of when exactly would be the best time as she knows nothing of the Grandmonts' plans; thinks probably late August or early September. Is longing to get to fresh air in the country; town seems oppressive after Taormina.

They all feel 'greatly honoured... with all these noble peace delegates' being at the Hague; the Congress was opened yesterday; one of the Dutch members told them 'what a feeble old president Baron de Staal seemed to be' and that 'the first meeting did not promise much'. Is sending some Taormina photographs; the one with Mrs C [Florence Cacciola Trevelyan?] is 'funny but too indistinct'; [Giuseppe] Bruno took the same view which better shows Mrs C. 'like some curious prehistoric Juliet on her balcony'; she has it and will show it to you, or Trevelyan could write to Bruno and ask to see the several pictures he took in her garden of her 'constructions'. Glad Trevelyan has heard some good music in London; she feels out of practice and is looking forward to playing with her sister [Abrahamina Röntgen] again. Knows her aunt is giving her the biography of Joachim by Moser for her birthday. Will also have to 'make special Vondel studies this summer'; feels she knows very little about him.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague. - Is very sorry she did not know in time to tell Bob the concert last Monday was cancelled; it was not [Julius Engelbert] Röntgen but [Johannes] Messchaert who was ill; he still cannot sing so the second concert will also be put off. Very sad as they would have had a good audience, and he will have to pay the costs. Has received Bob's poems and enjoyed reading them on the way to Almelo last Monday; likes part of 'the Indian poem' very much, though it is rather vague; the 'fairy poem' is charming and she wishes she had the power to set it to music; questions his choice of interpretation in the line of his Ronsard translation.

Is very glad Bob will come to The Hague; he is right that she would not like him to come without her family knowing; she is not under such 'romantically difficult' circumstances to make that necessary and what she said about their 'suspicions' probably made a stronger impression than she intended. Bramine [Hubrecht] even encouraged her to tell them about it; it would not be 'so unwise', since she is 'in reality quite free and independent', and if she could tell her aunt and be sure she would discuss it with her uncle, she might; however, thinks she would not feel real freedom when Bob was here if they knew what had happened. She will therefore tell her aunt that Bob intends to come over and do some translation work with her, asking her aunt to trust her and help 'conquer any objections' her uncle may have though she thinks he will agree at once. Marie [Hubrecht] and her American friend Maud [Howard] leave either next Monday or Tuesday, Marie for Florence and Maud for America via Paris; all three servants are then leaving in the first week of November so the household will be unsettled, and her aunt is suffering from a bad cold, so she will write as soon as all is well. Asks if he would prefer a first-rate hotel or a moderate one.

On the whole, had a good time at Almelo though it was strange to spend so much time with her friend [Adriana Salomonson Asser] after so long but they struck up quite a friendship again; she and her husband, a Jewish manufacturer [Henrik Salomonson] are very musical; it seems they hear little violin music so she was 'the talk of the town' after playing at their soirée. Is about to read Rostand's "Cyrano de Bergerac" and "La Samaritaine"; asks whether Bob knows and likes them.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Hotel & Pension Palumbo, Ravello, Golfo di Salerno. - Apologises for not writing more often. Is very sorry that her aunt has been so unwell; hopes the anxious time has now passed; can quite understand how her uncle might 'develop infinite degrees of fussiness' under the strain and thus be 'the direct opposite of [Alphonse] Grandmont' as he is in many other ways. Hopes Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht] also recovers quickly. His aunt Annie [Anna Maria Philips] is a 'dear creature', but always complains he does not write to or visit her enough; he also likes her 'invalid friend [Sophie Wicksteed]... to whom she has devoted herself'. His letter [about the landslide which damaged the Hotel Cappuccini at Amalfi] appeared in the "[Manchester] Guardian" on 2 January; it has pleased the locals as it says the coast is quite safe; thinks he will 'take to journalism', which is much easier than writing verse plays'. However, he has got on well this afternoon; is 'making no end of the wife, who is no end of a heroine'; teases Bessie by saying she will not get the chance to be such a faithful wife, as he will keep a closer eye on her. Copies out 'an old fellow who wrote about you in the 17th century' [Richard Crashaw, "Wishes to his (Supposed) Mistress"].

Continues the letter next morning; has breakfasted and 'pumped [his] ideas on Latin poetry into bucket Straughn Davidson [James Leigh Strachan-Davidson?] for half an hour'. Finishes copying out the Crashaw poem; thinks it influenced Browning. Glad Bessie has heard some music. Is 'very fond of Rameau', and has 'often heard Dolmetsch play him'. They must find out where Gluck is being played and go there; he 'can't wait much longer without hearing the Iphigenia and the other great ones'; though she might think him a Wagnerian. Hopes she will hear Lamond again. Finishes the letter in early afternoon. It is cold and stormy, and he will go to 'a nook under the cliff' to work. Discusses the rumours that there are letters incriminating [Joseph] Chamberlain [in the Jameson Raid?]; the 'Parnell letters and the Henry forgeries [in the Dreyfus case]' are warnings to be careful about such things, though if genuine they should be published; if this leads to a 'basis for peace so much the better'. Hopes Bessie's housekeeping is not tiring her; he will not be 'exacting' when they are married, 'especially with Mrs Enticknap to do everything' for her

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Hotel & Pension Palumbo, Ravello, Golfo di Salerno. - Has been 'out composing verses in a tempest'. Glad she is having happy dreams; suggests analyses for her one about the cicalas [9/26]. Quotes from Moore on sleep [Thomas Sturge Moore, "To An Early Spring Day"]. Sorry that her aunt's recovery is not speedier. Will send a letter to her tomorrow. Does not like Mrs Costelloe 'in many ways', but does not condemn her for 'refusing to live with Costelloe' who seems to have been 'almost impossible to live with', though she should not have been 'taken in' by him; thinks her and [Bernard] Berenson's relationship is 'as nice as those sort of relations can be'; discusses her influence on him. Supposes he will see Miss D. G. [Lina Duff Gordon] at Florence; explains the nature of their friendship further. He and Lina are on 'very good terms' again, and she likes his poem about her pet bat ["The Lady's Bat"], though it is not yet finished.

Continues the letter next day; has read most of the editor's letter in the paper sent by Bessie's uncle [in a Dutch paper, to the Duke of Devonshire, see 9/26]; thinks he is 'in the main right' but knows 'little of the facts, except what he has gathered from English writers who disapprove of the [Second Boer] war' such as Bryce, Hobson, Lecky and Courtney; since he has 'ornamented his columns with many not very apt quotations' Bob as a poet ought not to be too hard on him. Thinks he will spend two days with Berenson at Florence, since it is unlikely Mrs Costelloe will be back; has not yet heard from his mother about crossing with Bessie and the letter may not have reached her. Asks him his plans suit Bessie. Is torn between Venus and Apollo, and 'Apollo has all the nine young ladies [the Muses] on his side'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Hotel & Pension Palumbo, Ravello, presso Amalfi. - Very sorry to hear her aunt is no better; wishes her uncle would get a nurse; agrees that Bessie should not go to England yet and will therefore stay longer in Ravello; if her aunt is no better by the time he reaches the Hague he will stay only a few days and could come back later.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Hotel & Pension Palumbo, Ravello, Golfo di Salerno. - Sets out his revised plans due to Bessie's aunt's continued illness again; 'very sad for her to be ill during the last few months [Bessie] will be with her', though the marriage could be put off if necessary. Even if the physical side of his feelings for her were not there, believes he would want to have her as a constant companion, which he cannot say even for 'his dearest friends such as Sanger and Fry and [Thomas Sturge] Moore'. Perhaps he should not separate these two aspects of his feelings; consideration of the way her personality seems to be 'always changing' slightly. Cuts off these 'lover's speculations', saying he should return to Mr Mudge [?]. Thinks that Mrs [Mary] Costelloe will not be back when he stays with [Bernard] Berenson, though he could not change his plans now, and does not want to have a breach with her. Has not done well with his play recently, but 'modified the plot somewhat' yesterday and thinks he will get on better now; will be able to read up on medieval manners and costumes on his return to England. Expects he will have to go to Welcombe even if Bessie does not come, and there is 'a fine French book on Medieval customs in the library'. Glad she was pleased by the beetle he sent her; likes 'little everything' as an endearment; knows the feeling that a dream is still real after waking. Hopes they have a nurse for her aunt now. Copies out his translation of the Swallow Song of Rhodes; it is not quite right yet and he needs a dictionary to check some of the words.

Letter from Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven to R. C. Trevelyan

10 Prinsegracht, The Hague. - Received Bob's letter this morning, and nerved herself to tell her uncle and aunt about his intended arrival; her aunt 'understood at once' and made no difficulties, though said her uncle may make some; she then found her uncle writing to Bramine [Hubrecht] in his study and told him, he was amazed but wanted to 'grasp at once the whole situation' and told her he saw quite through her pretext and understood everything but she begged him not to speak further about it. So they are both quite cheerful about the subject, and are probably discussing it now she has gone to bed.

Writing on the next day, she says that things were not so cheerful that morning, and her uncle took up the subject of Bob's visit again after breakfast; will not go into detail, but he does tend to 'attach enormous importance to convention' and it is hard for him to take everything in. But he does not want to make things difficult, and will leave her 'quite free' when Bob is here; he would like Bob to pay a formal visit on his first afternoon in the Hague, when the pretext for Bob's stay, 'poor old Vondel', must be mentioned; Bob will then be able to come the following morning and probably regularly to do some work. In the afternoon when the weather is fine she has to walk with her aunt, who she thinks would like Bob to join them. Thought he might stay a fortnight; if it suits him to go on early to Italy of course he must, though asks if he is sure about meeting the Frys in Siena, as she thought they were going there before Florence, which is why the G[randmont]s did not meet them and why her cousin Marie [Hubrecht] has gone first to Lugano and Milan. Is sorry to hear Bob finds it hard to settle to work. Discusses further her objection to Bob's translation of a French phrase [from Ronsard]; thanks him for his 'little grammar lesson about "shall" and "will"'.

The latest news of the [Second Boer] war must be 'very distressing' to the English; asks if Bob still feels it would be good if the English were 'well beaten'. Of course thought of the war itself is 'an intense horror'. Asks if Bob knows anyone fighting; they have heard of some 'striking losses', such as the death of a 'very beloved nephew' of their friend Dr Koster [Tuimen Hendrik Blom Coster?]. The feeling against Britain is very strong in the Netherlands; 'flags were put up in many streets when the news of Ladysmith reached' them; wonders if Bob will mind that when he comes. Suggested the 12th as the day he should come since he had mentioned a [rugby?] football game the day before; would not deprive him the chance of 'displaying [his] chief if not only vanity' and hopes he will enjoy himself. and not come over 'with a blue eye & some fractured bones'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3 Via Camerata, Florence. - Asks if someone could book him a room at the Twee Steden, or the Angleterre if that is not possible; she need not come to meet him at the station since he will arrive so late. Berenson has given him a list of Russian books in translation to read. His mother says they should decide themselves whether he should accompany to England, and do as her uncle and aunt think right. Does hope she will be able to come on the 14th and spend some time at Welcombe. The Frys have got them a ring. Hopes her aunt is still better, as he could not bear not to see Bessie, will shave away the bristles from the journey so that they can pay each other some of their 'debt of K[isses]'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3 Hare Court, Inner Temple. - Apologises for not saying goodbye properly on the boat; hopes the stewardess looked after her, that she had a good crossing, and found everyone well at home. Asks her to thank Louisa [Hubrecht, who was staying with her uncle and aunt]. His hotel was very comfortable; had a good journey to London, reading more of "Arne" [by Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson?]. Is glad to return to his 'studious habits', but even more so to think that soon she will share them with him. Has enjoyed his day at the British Museum. Had supper with the Sickerts and a 'long talk with Oswald', one of the 'nicest' of his friends whom he thinks she will like very much. Will probably go to Highgate to see [Thomas Sturge] Moore tomorrow, then to Dorking next day. Has not yet seen [Charles] Sanger, who must be out for the evening. Has been to Curry & Paxton, who will have them [spectacles for Ambro Hubrecht?] ready in about a week. Is paying Luzac [?]. Saw his parents this morning; his father has almost recovered. Read the Gospel of Nicodemus and some [Matteo?] Bandello stories at the British Museum. Expects she will soon be discussing their marriage date with her uncle and explaining his parents' plans to travel over. Will write to Sir Henry Howard [the British ambassador to the Netherlands] when the date is settled. Sanger has just been telling the story of his friend Robertson's love affair with an American girl who has just died; Sanger is going to Greece, and has not had 'his bad headaches' recently. Was sent a guinea by the "Manchester Guardian" [for his letter on the Amalfi landslip]. Frank Holland has sent a letter [17/145] promising him a set of Anatole France [as a wedding present]; Bob thinks what he has read of France 'very good'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

British Museum. - Encloses Luzac's receipt, which she may give to her uncle. Spent yesterday afternoon at Highgate listening to [Thomas Sturge] Moore's new poetry, which was 'very refreshing'; Moore liked his bat ["The Lady's Bat"], though suggested some alterations; did not show him his play but hopes to do so soon. Has just seen [Laurence] Binyon has shown him a 'new ode of Tristram and Iseult' ["Tristram's End"] which is 'quite good but perhaps not first class'. Is taking Moore's play "Mariamne" to Dorking to read again and hopes to be 'in train' to do something himself. Will not order the beds until nearer the time he goes to Holland, but will talk to [Roger] Fry about the bedroom; she shall see and approve the colour before he distempers the walls. Tends to agree with her that they should economise on furnishing, to leave 'a good margin' for things such as foreign travel; he still also wants her to have a new violin. Is dining this evening with [Charles] Sanger, [Goldsworthy Lowes] Dickinson and [Desmond] MacCarthy; Sanger is 'not at all well'; hopes his Greek journey will put him right. Copies out some lines from Binyon's Tristram poem. Very glad that Bessie's aunt was so much better on her return; wonders if the Luzacs have called; the Sickerts know a Hague painter called [Dirk] Jansen, whom they like but do not care much for his painting.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcot [sic: Westcott], Dorking. - Is writing in the 'little room' he hopes will be hers; the fire burns well and it is warm and looks 'quite nice' now he has sent the Insley furniture to the spare room. Thinks he has thought of a way to improve his play and is happier about it now. Is reading Mériméee's "Les Cosaques D'Autrefois ", which is 'stunning'. Will write to the Insleys about their furniture; there is plenty of room for her books. Has not seen the Frys since Sunday; he [Roger Fry] understood about distempering the bedroom since they do not like the paper, though he probably thinks they are making a mistake. Has nearly finished "Arne" [by Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson?]; discusses why he does not 'take to it altogether'. Encloses a letter from his Aunt Meg [Price]; he knows nothing about pianos so she should tell him what to say. Someone suggested by [Julius Engelbert] Röntgen might help them choose; does not know whether his aunt's 'professional friend' is to be trusted. One day they will have room for a big piano, but expects this would have to be an upright.

Finishes the letter next morning. Is sorry her aunt is not as much stronger as she first thought; hopes that the finer weather will help. Expects it is right for her to sell the land; she would know better than he where to put the money. Very glad her uncle and aunt think Whitsuntide will do [for the wedding]; someone like [Abraham?] Bredius would probably be best as the witness; her uncle once suggested the consul at Rotterdam, if he were Dutch. Doubts if any of his friends will come; thinks he will not ask. Was stupid to leave Luzac's bill in London; has asked it to be sent to him.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcot, Dorking. - Tells her about a discussion with Bargman, the man who did the house for him, about damp, the possibility of putting in a baize door as Gussie [Enticknap] can be 'a little obstreperous' after tea; and burglars. Thinks perhaps he should have the library, as first decided. [His aunt Meg Price] says she will pay the extra when they want a grand piano if she is still alive, which is 'very generous'; he has suggested she gets them a Broadwood £40 upright, but her 'professional friend' will know best what will suit a small room. They must go and visit as soon as they can; she rather reproached Bob for not visiting. Gives the measurements for the table. Sends her a curl from his head; is wearing hers next to his heart. Thinks he will send "The [Lady's] Bat" and "Dryope", and perhaps some others, to the "Speaker"; Hammond, an editor he knows, thinks they may put them in. Can break off his tenancy of the Temple rooms whenever he likes, but should like to keep them for the summer; Sanger will probably find another tenant in the summer, though he may still marry, which Bob and Fry think would probably be best although his friend [Dora Pease] has treated him badly. Sanger is in financial difficulty, which Bob does not want to worsen. Thinks he will probably go to the Lizard for a few days at Easter. Has not yet written to the Borrowdale people [the Peppers] about the honeymoon, nor to her uncle, which he should do this evening. Does not anticipate that there will be any difficulties regarding the wedding, but he should check; will leave the precise date of the ceremony for her and her relations to choose. Asks if she has heard from the Grandmonts. Had a scare yesterday when his Shakespeare, two Greek books, and the manuscript of his play, which he had hidden in the woods then 'wandered off meditating' were taken home by a passing labourer; was in despair but the gamekeeper suggested where they might be. The [Second Boer] war is 'getting to a very unpleasant state': the 'war party are very brutal, breaking up meetings, rioting etc'. Thinks the Government has behaved 'shockingly' for not suppressing them, there has been much indignation against them which may do good in the end.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcot, Dorking. - Discusses post times. The weather has been 'absolutely beastly' and he has a cold, which gave him a nose-bleed this morning. Took a day off yesterday and lunched with the Frys; [Roger] Fry is very busy, having had to give an extra lecture last week, so Bob conveys his advice on house decoration. Need good painters, as [George?] Moore had trouble when he was having his Cambridge rooms done, due to the 'stupidity of the workmen'. Gives his aunt Meg Price's address. Thinks he is becoming 'more romantic' about her; wishes he had been with her to 'caress... and explain away [his] last cruel letter' in which he thoughtlessly exaggerated his 'regret at [his] fading days of singleness' [9/119]. She will certainly not come between him and his friends, as she has 'quite enough of their own intellectual qualities to be their friend in the same way' he is. Has usually gone abroad alone and not allowed his 'sensations to be interfered with by those of others'; will probably enjoy going to Greece more with her than with 'people like Daniel and Mayor'. Attempts to explain his feelings in detail. Will be able to talk freely to his friends after his marriage, though 'it is true that men do talk more obscenely, and more blasphemously, than they ever quite dare to talk before women' and he thinks that this difference is right. Should not have written 'so carelessly' and caused her pain. Has written to her uncle saying he and she should fix the date. Crompton [Llewelyn] Davies came for tea last Sunday; he is probably going to the Lizard at Easter; he said his brother [Arthur?] and his wife went to Land's End for his honeymoon which was 'very satisfactory', but that Savernake near Salisbury plain was the 'best place conceivable', with 'every kind of scenery' only an hour from London. He says it has a good inn; Bob may look on his way to Cornwall. Seatoller [in Borrowdale] is very nice too, but much further away. Has not yet heard from Daniel how Sanger is; will tell Bessie [about Sanger's unhappy love affair] when he sees her; she guessed correctly that the woman was Dora. He and Fry still think it would have been best for them to marry, but that now seems unlikely; her treatment of him is 'not through heartlessness exactly... but owing to circumstances, and also to her rather unusual temperament'. Has done some work, and has been re-reading Flaubert's letters; feels more in sympathy with him than any other modern writer. His mother says Charles and George are thinking of giving Bessie a 'very pretty sort of box to keep music in'; wishes they would give them the flying trunk or carpet Bessie mentioned. They will have to content themselves with meeting in dreams, though it seems [Empedocle] Gaglio has a dream-carpet which will take him into Bessie's brain; still, he does not have a lock of her hair so Bob has a start.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcot, Dorking. - Sorry to hear about Bessie's cold; hopes it has now gone. Has discovered some 'wonderful woodland places in the valley... the woods here are quite endless'. Impatiently waiting for spring; is usually in Italy in February and March. She should read Flaubert's letters; he expresses several things Bob feels but is 'too lazy' or lacks the power to explain. Is having difficulty getting into the right frame of mind to work, but thinks he has made his play better by his alterations. Has been reading some Heine and [Goethe's] "Faust" in German, but cannot really spare enough time for it. Much interested in the 'domestic politics' Bessie mentions, and would like to meet some more of her half-sisters; expects he will when he comes to the Netherlands soon. Asks her to thank her uncle for his kind letter; would like to leave the question of the post-marriage celebrations to her and her father; is always 'rather afraid of formal speeches and ceremonies' but would not object if they wanted it. Wonders how she likes "Wuthering Heights"; for him 'crude as it is in some ways... it beats almost all English novels'. Is pleased that [Alfred] Enticknap has got a permanent place at a nearby house, though he will still be able to do some work for him and even the Frys, who say he is a 'firstclass gardener'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

Penmenner House, The Lizard, Cornwall. - Likes the sketch of Bessie's wedding costume; quite Watteau-esque as she says. He is 'no judge of silks' but the piece she sends looks good; encloses samples of cloth for his trousers and for a tweed suit and asks her opinion. Will probably stay in Cornwall till next Wednesday; [George] Moore and MacCarthy are the only others there at the moment; [G.H.?] Hardy left yesterday, and he hopes both 'Llewelyn Davieses' [Crompton and Theodore?] are coming tomorrow. Describes the place; Moore 'played a lot and sang yesterday after tea', then they played cards and talked. Is reading James's "Daisy Miller", which is 'charming'. Discussion of the music box; has written to his mother to suggest having the partitions taken out; it is from both George and Charles. Expects it would be best to invite the consul [Henry Turing, at Rotterdam, to the wedding celebration]; he may not come. Did not mean that Sir Henry [Howard] would arrange all the legal marriage business, but he offered to arrange the ceremony and invitation of the consul; expects he could do this most easily but it would not matter if they or her uncle should arrange it. Will write to Sir Henry or Turing when he hears from her uncle, though is not sure what to say. Would prefer to invite Sir Henry to the wedding, especially as Bob's father and mother are coming, feels he should ask his parents what they think. Sir Henry is a relation, and has 'shown great good-will and readiness'.

Does not see why Bessie should cut herself off completely from her Dutch musical friends; she will 'often be in Holland', and will 'surely stay at Mein's [sic: Mien Rontgen's] in Amsterdam'; in England, she will of course have 'complete freedom to make her own friends' and must keep up and develop her own talents as much as she can; he will enjoy hearing her play, but also going to hear others and getting to know her friends, but that does not mean she should not have independence of interests and friendships. Thinks that women 'have not enough respect for their own intellectual lives' and give it up too easily on marriage, through their husband's fault or their own; she should 'quite seriously consider going to settle in Berlin for 5 or 6 months' for her music. Mrs [Helen] Fry's marriage has made her more of a painter. Her pleurisy is better now; thinks Bessie exaggerates the importance of her cigarette smoking, and that any ill effects it does have are balanced by the help it gives her to create art. Has never 'been in danger of being in love' with Helen Fry, but always found her 'more interesting and amusing than any woman [he] ever met... with a completely original personality', and would not think of criticising such a person's habits but would assume they are 'best suited to their temperament'; in the same way, Moore probably 'drinks more whisky than is good for his health, and smokes too much too', but he would not criticise him. Bessie is also 'an original person' with a 'personal genius of [her] own', but in addition he loves her; has never felt the same about any other woman.

Continues the letter next day. Has finished "Daisy Miller"; and is doing some German, getting on better than he thought he would. Part of the reason for saying he would 'never learn German' was an 'exaggerated idea of the difficulty', but more because he thought, and still thinks, it will be less of a 'literary education' than other languages; is chiefly learning it for Goethe, though being able to read German scholarship will be useful. Has read Coleridge's translation of "Wallenstein", which Schiller himself claimed was as good as the original; thinks English and [Ancient] Greek lyric poetry is better than the German he has read. Very sorry about Lula [Julius Röntgen]; asks if it [his illness] will do more than postpone him going to Berlin. Has heard from Daniel that Sanger is 'getting on quite well'; hopes he will return from Greece 'quite himself again'. Will be nice for Bessie to see the Joneses [Herbert and Alice] again; he has 'become a little parsonic perhaps' but very nice; has seen little of him for the last few years. Bessie should certainly get [Stevenson's] "Suicide Club" for Jan [Hubrecht]; will pay half towards it. Will certainly come before Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht] returns. Has grown 'such a beard, finer than Moore's and McCarthy's, though they have grown their's for weeks'. Describes their daily routine. Is encouraged that Moore likes several recent poems he himself was doubtful about; is copying out the play and will show him today or tomorrow. The Davieses are coming this afternoon. Signs off with a doggerel verse.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Has to go to meet [Desmond] MacCarthy soon and may not finish letter in time for the post; hope matters [regarding the wedding] have cleared up. Glad it is settled about Turing; expect her uncle will arrange about the banns and talk to the Burgermaster [sic]. Saw the Frys today; is going with them to Roundhurst next Monday, to stay a night at the farm where he would like to spend the first days of their honeymoon; the nightingales will be 'wonderful', there are none in the North, and 'a honeymoon without nightingales would never do'. Fry thinks he should not miss the [Apostles'] dinner but they can discuss this. Some of his friends have 'combined' to give them the clavichord painted by Mrs Fry, which Bessie has seen; he likes it very much as a work of art; also as an instrument, though not perhaps as much as the Frys and Dolmetsch; thinks it a 'splendid present'. [Bernard] Berenson is the 'chief contributor'; will send her the list of the contributors, about twenty of them, soon.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Last day at Dorking before he goes to Cornwall; is working well, and encloses a poem he wrote yesterday; it perhaps does not express what he feels about love, but is pretty; Sappho used the comparison of a rose to Venus's elbow first. Glad her cold has gone. Is going to Cornwall on Wednesday, and will probably stay a week; will write and probably do some German. Copies out the Heine poem [comparing the poet to Laocoon and his love to a snake], "Lyrical Intermezzo "13; likes the one she sends; quotes from Heine to promise that she will live happily. Has just finished [Victor Hugo's] "Hernani"; remembers she once indicated she did not like it; sets out his own response; prefers Euripides' "Medea" which he has also been reading and will help him with his own play. Agrees that the consul, Henry Turing, should not be invited to the wedding breakfast; better to invite [Abraham?] Bredius or someone else they all know. Is ready to write to Turing, but thinks it would be simplest if Sir Henry Howard did, as he offered; not important though if her uncle thinks otherwise. Must write to Sir Henry; as he told her uncle, thought it 'a little discourteous' to Sir Henry not to let him arrange everything as he offered. Tells he not to worry about these details. Agrees to the 7th [June] as the date; will tell his parents and is sure they will agree too. Asks if he saw her lace in London; not sure what 'Watteau pleats' are but likes the idea of them.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3, Hare Court, Inner Temple. - Returned last night and found her letter with the patterns. [Desmond] MacCarthy is here, as they went to see Sudermann's "Magda" ["Heimat"]; they are now going out to 'buy straw hats and see pictures and Sturges [Moore]'. Goes back [to Westcott] tomorrow. Had a good time at the Lizard; [George] Moore liked his play better than expected, though thinks its subject is 'not very congenial' to Bob and he does better with 'lighter and more comedy subjects'; Bob thinks he agrees, but will try to finish this one.

Continues the letter next day after returning to Westcott. He and MacCarthy went with a literary friend of Bob's called Horne to a music hall to see Dan Leno, 'a quite Shakespearian genius' whom Bessie must see one day. Will write to [Henry] Turing tomorrow and send it through Sir Henry [Howard]. Ready to admit her uncle is right and also does not want Sir Henry to be at the wedding; thinks his parents will understand if he talks to them. The Gr[andmonts]'s feelings 'make it necessary Sir H. should not be there', though he does not think they should carry them to such lengths. Encloses two new trouser patterns with the one she chose before. Hopes she enjoys her visits and concert, and sees something of J[oachim].

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Has had many letters to write this morning: to Sir Henry and Mr Turing; to Mrs Pepper at Seatoller to reserve rooms and ask if they will have the house to themselves; to Mr Insley to ask when he will collect his furniture; then to Irene Zocco who has just sent back the books he lent her. Teasingly wonders whether he should ask permission before writing to 'young foreign ladies'; will continue writing, and sending books 'as she is very few, and is too poor to get them, and yet is genuinely fond of reading'; he and Bessie must see them when they are next in Sicily. Finally wrote to his mother to thank her for the things she is sending; hopes the sofa will be comfortable. Very glad Bessie is meeting Joachim again. Does not at all think it will be necessary to invite the Howards [to the wedding]; would just like to speak to his mother first; takes the point that the invitations are sent by her uncle and aunt. Agrees that it would be good to be married totally privately, but she must not worry herself. Did not write any poetry yesterday, but had a 'fine time on the moor'. Agrees that she was 'a bold girl to ask [him] to come over and vondle' her.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Has received the conditions of marriage from Bessie's uncle, which seem all right and which he will discuss with his father at the end of the week. Is not sure about coming over early in April [sic: May], as her uncle seems to expect; in his 'last month of freedom' he would like to have a few friends such as Phelps, Sickert, and MacCarthy to stay, and to go with the Frys to Roundhurst to see the bluebells. Also wants to get more work done. Appreciates that these reasons 'look a bit selfish', and that her uncle and aunt want to see them together; there will also be business to complete. Will certainly be there for her birthday, and if Tuttie [Maria Hubrecht] is coming on the 17th or 18th would come a few days before that. Bessie must say if she does not think this early enough. Asks whether the catalogue for the beds is at Grosvenor Crescent; asks what else must be bought, and whether the pillows will fit their pillow cases. Has written to Thuring [sic: Henry Turing] and Sir Henry [Howard]. Asks about the tie and footwear he should wear for the wedding; has a pair he wore for Roger [Fry]'s wedding he thinks are all right. The Frys are away for a holiday; when they return soon he will settle on colours for the bedroom and send them. Asks if she has thought about their return crossing. His mother does not think his father will want to see him for a few days.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3 Hare Court, Inner Temple, London E.C. - Glad to hear that [Joseph] Joachim was so nice to her; hopes she also enjoyed her evening with the Piersons. Has talked to his father, who has convinced him that they should invite Sir Henry Howard to the wedding, as a relative; admits that it would be strange not to do so in England. Told his father it may cause difficulties with the Grandmonts; but he replied that politics should not enter into the matter. In a way it would be a slight to his father, since he wishes it, not to invite them; he would in that case not come over. Thinks that the Howards would not be 'much in the way' at the wedding, especially as his brothers and parents will be there; does not think him 'a bad fellow, and she, though dull, was quite harmless'; will not deny it would be pleasanter if they did not come. More serious if the Grandmonts really object; understands their feelings, though thinks them 'wrong and unreasonable'; they are among Bessie's best friends and good friends of his too, and it is through them that he and Bessie know each other; would be a great pity if they did not come. Does not think the fact her uncle, who will send the invitations, does not know the Howards is 'essential'. She will have to explain the situation to him; then the Grandmonts should probably be told as soon as possible so that they can make a decision. He or his father could write to her uncle to explain if she prefers.

The marriage conditions are all right; both he and his father will write to her uncle about them. Is going to Cambridge tomorrow and will see Tom Moore; wants to read him the two finished acts of the play. Will probably 'take wings' on Saturday evening: become an 'angel' and 'cease to be an active member of the Society of Apostles'. [Oswald?] Sickert is probably coming to Dorking the Sunday after; has worked well recently, and a few visitors will not make much difference. Sanger is back and seems well again, from the little Bob has seen of him. Has been to the tailors and it is hard to find material of the kind she wants; sends some more patterns, which he thinks will look lighter when made up and were lighter than the ones he wore for Roger [Fry's] wedding. The travelling clock which the servants have given them is very good; there was a note with it in Booa [Mary Prestwich]'s handwriting, which he copies out. Wants to write them a thank-you note, but is unsure how to address it; had better ask his mother.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

8, Grosvenor Crescent, S.W. - Is very sorry Bessie is 'being given this pain' and there is 'all this unpleasantness' [about inviting Sir Henry Howard to the wedding]; thinks it will all come right in the end. Has spoken to his parents about it; they appreciate her uncle's point of view, though they are 'annoyed at him'. They feel it is 'out of the question' to force her uncle to invite anyone he does not want; however, his father feels it 'impossible to come under the circumstances'; Bob's mother, who is no relation of the Howards, and his brothers will come. His parents have been very kind; his mother is writing a letter to Bessie which she should be able to show her uncle. Does not think it would improve matters if her uncle gave in now. His father is very fond of Bessie, and has been 'extraordinarily kind' to Bob. Bob will come over earlier if she wants him to. Plans to return to Dorking this morning.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Is sure things will improve and she must not worry; as his mother says, 'it is really rather... a storm in a teacup'; it is nothing to compare to the happiness that will soon be theirs. Though he often fails 'through weakness and idleness', his life 'has been passionately devoted... to the best and most beautiful things which [his] imagination can attain to' and hers will be as well; lists all that will be good in their lives. Will write again to the consul [Henry Turing] if he does not hear from him today, since they need to know whether he can come on the 7th [June]; has also not heard from Sir Henry Howard, through whom he sent the letter; will send the second letter direct to Turing. There has been some delay at the lawyers about the settlements; has written to tell them to speed up. Bessie should tell him if he need do anything else regarding the marriage conditions her uncle sent. Thinks he may come over on 12 or 13 June. Meta Smith, his aunt Margaret's daughter, has sent a silver inkstand, and Mrs Holman Hunt a piece of Japanese silk. Had a good time at Cambridge: saw Mrs McTaggart, a 'nice quiet sort of person'; Tom Moore read his play and thinks it should come out well though he has pointed out 'some serious faults and suggested alterations'; Moore is going to give him a lot of his woodcuts, and has begun an Epithalamium for them, though since he has not got on with it says they should defer the wedding for a month. Asks what he should do about the Apostles' dinner; it will be 'quite exceptional this year', Harcourt is president and everyone will come; would very much like to go but will not break their honeymoon if she does not wish it. Very keen to go to the lakes eventually, but they could spend a few days before the dinner at Blackdown among his 'old haunts'; Mrs Enticknap's aunt lives in a farmhouse a mile from Roundhurst, which would be perfect. Hopes [Alice and Herbert] Jones' visit has been a success. [Desmond] MacCarthy is coming tomorrow for a few days and [Oswald?] Sickert on Sunday for the day. Will see [the Frys] this evening and discuss colours for the walls. Thinks [Charles] Sanger is very happy; is not entirely sure [about the marriage], since 'Dora has behaved so strangely', but everything seems to be coming right. Has ben reading Emerson on poetry and imagination and thinks it 'amazingly fine and right'. Most people think "Pères et enfants [Fathers and Sons]" is Turgenev's best book; he himself does not like the ending but finds the book charming; has heard the French translation, the only one he has read, is better than the German or English one - Sickert says so and he is half-German. Has ordered the trousers, and found the catalogue so will order the beds and so on next week. Glad Bessie got on with her socialist sister [Theodora]. has just had a note from Sir Henry Howard saying 7 June will suit Turing; she should let her uncle know. Does not think there will be further delay with the legal papers.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

8 Grosvenor Crescent, London S.W. - Has come to London to be nearer to Bessie in her 'difficulties'; his train was late so his parents were out when he arrived, but will talk to them later. Does not think they will yet have had a letter from her. 'Grieved' she reproaches herself for writing as she did [about her uncle's reaction to the idea of inviting Sir Henry Howard]; does not think he was wrong to tell his father but understands why she might think he was. As for his mother's letter, he understands why Bessie has appealed directly to his father. His father has sent him a copy and he thinks it may hold out 'a hope of his coming' to the wedding after all. Thinks the best solution is for the Howards to be invited and his father come; is now anxious about how her uncle will take his mother's letter, which is meant to be conciliatory; her uncle has no right to be angry with her. His father is not offended; even less so than when he first learnt of the Grandmonts' possible reaction to Sir Henry being invited. Further discussion of the situation. Will come over earlier if she wants him to, otherwise will cross next Monday and stay in the same hotel. If this matter is settled, may go to Roundhurst with the Frys on Friday, where he wants to take her before the [Apostles'] dinner. Is glad she does not mind him going; it is not in Cambridge but London, where they could perhaps stop the night at a hotel. Will bring over her underclothes and the spectacles. Is sorry Alice Jones minded so much about the civil marriage; 'Church people in England are often very difficult on such matters, but Alice is 'evidently very nice, and very fond' of Bessie. Tells Bessie to get Dutch books with their [Alice and Herbert Jones's] present; would not have her 'unDutched for the world'. Glad his last letter gave her 'so much joy and confidence'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3, Hare Court, Inner Temple. - Has come [to London] to be nearer to her. Hopes she got his wire to send letters to G[rosvenor] C[rescent]. Thinks his father is right that Bessie should show the letter at once, so that her uncle may realise the situation and the matter be settled a quickly as possible. Thinks she was right to state the whole thing to him as she did, and if her uncle is angry with her for this he is wrong. Is sorry she thinks he was wrong to tell his father, but does not see he had a choice; his father 'must be dealt with absolutely openly' and her uncle's objection to inviting the Howards 'concerned him nearly. Understands and sympathises with her reasons for writing to his father, but thinks it was a mistake. If her uncle were to invite the Howards after all, and do it 'in the right spirit', his father may come, though he cannot be sure of this. She must not allow herself to be upset.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3, Hare Court, Inner Temple. - Is glad that matters are resolving themselves, even if not in an ideal way; does not think her uncle 'had any right' to speak of them as he did, but since he has thereby found a way out of the difficulty, they must not mind, though it was he who caused the difficulty and did not write directly to Bob's father about his objections [to inviting the Howards to the wedding]. Thinks Bessie should not have written to his father instead of showing the letter to her family at once, but it was an understandable mistake. His mother was very sympathetic and wise about everything this morning. A shame Ambro [Hubrecht] altered the letter, but he might have been the one to 'bring him to reason'. He and his family do not want the religious marriage, neither does she, so there is no need for it; 'absurd' to suggest that Sir H[enry Howard] cares; his father will probably 'settle that difficulty in his letter'. There was a small delay with the legal papers, which are being sent today; would perhaps be best for him to stay in England until they are signed. Will probably go to Roundhurst with the Frys for a night on Friday. Must not take her uncle being hard on them too much to heart; he is wrong, so she can laugh at him privately; 'it is a great thing to laugh at people; it is much better than being bitter'. His father is very relieved and now wants to come to the wedding very much. Had a good time with MacCarthy and [Oswald?] Sickert, though he was anxious about Bessie. Is glad she likes the idea of going to Haslemere first. Thinks he told her that the [Apostles'] dinner is in London, not Cambridge, and they might stay the night there before going North. Berenson and some of his other friends have got together to buy the clavichord painted by Mrs Fry. He likes it very much 'as a work of art', as he likes almost all of her work; also as an instrument, though not as much as the Frys and Dolmetsch do. Will send her the list of contributors soon. The Holman Hunts have sent a 'charming piece of old Japanese print'. Will bring over his frock coat, new blue suit and new country suit; does not think he needs his London clothes, which are 'very old and shabby'. Needs a new topper [top hat]. Asks whether he should cross to Flushing or the Hoek.

Adds a postscript saying that he has been to a 'very amusing farce with [Henry Francis?] Previté', with 'lots of very good things in it about falling in love' which interested him more than would have been the case in 'the old days'. It was by [George] Bernard Shaw ["You Never Can Tell"?], whom Bessie may not have heard of. Will write tonight to Berenson and some of his 'clavichord friends'; his letter to the servants apparently pleased them very much. Sanger is 'at this moment writing to Dora on the same table'.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

The Mill House, Westcott, Dorking. - Met the 'old postman' on his way back from the station so got her letter early; tipped the postman a shilling last week so he did not mind handing it over, and probably 'knows the sort of person these constant Dutch letters come from' and sympathises with Bob's eagerness. Glad that her letter was so cheerful. If the legal papers are long delayed, expects he will be able to sign them in Holland; if it is just a matter of a few days will be better to wait and sign them here. Thinks she is right that the Flushing route is best to travel back on. Does not know which hotel his parents will stay at [in the Hague]; thinks his father mentioned this in the letter to her uncle; thinks he himself will stay at the Twee Stede. Needs to get a topper; if he gets one in the Hague this will save taking a hat box. His mother has knitted him a white tie; asks if this would do. If his father's letter does not decide her uncle against it, she must tell him that Bob is 'very strongly against it'; though he would give in if there turns out to be a reason such as her aunt wanting it. Aunt Annie [Philips]'s silver candlesticks have come and are 'very splendid'; Mr [Charles Augustus] Fitch, the Trevelyans' clergyman in Northumberland, 'has sent a very pretty little silver mustard pot'. Hopes that Madame Dolmetsch, who sometimes visits the Frys, will come to play the clavichord; Dolmetsch could get them the Bach clavichord music; Bob is sure Bessie could play it 'well enough to please [him]', anyway he looks on the clavichord 'more as a picture than as an instrument. The roses are coming up well. Thoughts about married happiness Glad she likes 'P. & P.' ["Pride and Prejudice"] which is 'great fun'. May go to Roundhurst for a night with the Frys if it is fine on Saturday; will probably go to London on Monday. Expects she will bring her bicycle over.

Letter from Bramine Hubrecht to R. C. Trevelyan

Florence. - She and her husband have often thought and talked about Trevelyan since he left them, wondering what the future will hold; they 'must leave that to dear Bessie'. Things will be hard for them both now: Bessie will be in 'isolation' at home, as she will not be able to discuss this matter with Bramine's parents or sister unless she is 'absolutely clear in her own mind - it would be mental torture'. The 'terrible business of the [Second Boer] war' will also make an impression on her, feeling as she already does so strongly 'the wrench which marriage with a foreigner would be'. The worst thing about the war is 'the hypocracy [sic] with which all the English statesmen seem to be saturated', preparing for six months while giving the Boers the 'illusion' that an agreement could be made; and then there are speeches like that of Balfour and 'other so called honourable and religious gentleman'. Meanwhile, Harcourt 'protests, but will vote for the money [further military funding]! Is there then no generous mind left?' Are the English so much come down since Lord Chatham?'. In Chatham's day, however, the war was 'against men of the same race' rather than 'those stupid Boers, who live according to their antiquated notions derived from the old testament'; is 'bitter, very bitter, against the wicked Government', however much she likes Trevelyan, whom she calls 'my dear fellow'. As for Queen Victoria, 'one sees how, by being a sort of machine all one's life, one becomes one really at last'; wonders why she did not appeal to the nation; also criticises the other rules who sent ambassadors to the peace conference and 'do not move an inch to help against war', it is a sign of how low the 'moral standard' everywhere seems to be. In time the world will be 'one big Exchange' with no poetry, and nothing mattering but money and greed.

Returns to the letter after several days, now in Rome; meanwhile the British Parliament, apart for a few Irish representatives, have voted funds for the war; cannot understand the Whigs. She cannot sleep at night, and having 'loved the English so', nearly hates them now; cannot write to Bessie about Trevelyan, and in her place 'could never consent to give up my birthright of Dutchwoman, to become a subject of that wicked mecreant [sic] the prince of Wales', who 'sells his soul and that of his subjects for the gold of Africa' and will not even go out to fight himself. Has just received a letter from Bessie, which says Trevelyan is going to see her; prays that if he wins her love his influence may 'widen and deepen her love for all beings and things'. Feels 'very responsible in this matter', since it was she who brought them together, and Bessie is 'half sister, half child, exceedingly dear'. Would be 'dreadful if she became tainted by what seems... the national vice of the English = selfdeceiving egotism, overbearingness, hypocrisy' which they call 'commonsense'. Begs his pardon for speaking so openly, which she does as she knows he has 'width of mind enough to shake off all chauvinistic feeling'; perhaps he does not think the opposition should have refused the funds or resigned.

Letter from R. C. Trevelyan to Elizabeth des Amorie van der Hoeven

3, Hare Court, Inner Temple. - His flowers could not be sent on Sunday; fears they will be all withered. Has written to her uncle. His father thinks Bob will be able to sign the papers on Wednesday afternoon and travel in the evening. Will try and see the Dutch consul tomorrow about the birth certificate, though will not be able to show him the copy till his father returns from Welcombe. Will leave things such as the books he has brought for their honeymoon in London; asks again whether he should bring his poems over. Sorry that he 'dare[s] not trust a Dutch hatter' and will buy one in London; ' does 'not consider any "foreigner" has a proper idea of a top hat, except one or two Parisians'. She should settle about the wedding luncheon with her uncle if she feels strongly [about not having it in the hotel]; it would certainly not be 'so homely and nice'; expects Bessie's aunt would be on her side. His mother's cousin Harry [Henry Yates] Thompson has sent them a seventeenth century book on Cambridge 'with prints of all the colleges', a marble paperweight and a silver apostle fork. Has Booa [Mary Prestwich]'s parcel; will bring [Ambro Hubrecht's] spectacles with him. Is going to spend his 'last real Bachelor evening' tomorrow with Tommy Phelps; they are going to see "Tannhäuser"; not a perfect production, but [Milka] Ternina, 'the finest opera actress [Bob] has yet seen', is singing.

Results 1 to 30 of 150